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February 27, 2013

Top ten tree and shrub symbols: Cypress, agave, weeping willows and gums

This is the fourth blog post in a series which celebrates the Integration and Application Network (IAN) symbol library by highlighting some of the most interesting symbols. The previous blogs were on marine flora and fauna, and birds and this blog is focused on trees and shrubs in the IAN symbol library. 1) The Gum […]

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February 25, 2013

The role of science in environmental management case studies along a population gradient

The management objectives for achieving ecosystem health can be divided into ecosystem objectives, water quality objectives, and human health objectives (Pantus and Dennison 2005). Different population sizes result in different environmental issues and ecosystem management objectives. Therefore, the way of approaching management objectives vary based on different population sizes. In this essay, we compare five […]

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February 22, 2013

Top ten bird symbols: Kookaburras, flamingos, geese and tropicbirds

This is the third blog post in a series which celebrates the Integration and Application Network (IAN) symbol library by highlighting some of the most interesting symbols. The first blogs were of marine flora and fauna and this blog depicts some of the beautiful birds in the IAN symbol library. 1) My favorite bird is […]

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February 21, 2013

Resilience of Coastal Communities Depends on Maintaining Social Infrastructure

Hurricane Sandy was a wake-up call. More and more, people are asking, “What can be done to sustain coastal communities in the face of climate change and accelerated sea level rise?” The story of Holland Island, a once-thriving fishing community, reveals the importance of maintaining social infrastructure to sustain communities. Coastal communities must be resilient […]

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February 18, 2013

The Chesapeake Bay and the Changing Times: Beyond Science and Management

The Chesapeake Bay is the largest estuary in the United States, defined by a wide range of ecological and physical features. It supports a diverse and dynamic ecosystem which displays not only remarkable evolutionary traits but also a reflection of human history. The Chesapeake Bay and its watershed, once populated with submersed aquatic vegetation (SAV) […]

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February 12, 2013

Managing for Sustainable Ecosystems: Our Human Role

Humans depend on ecosystems, whether for food, shelter, work or recreation, and these interactions are universal. We are the key ingredient to managing ourselves and rehabilitating ecosystems in order to maintain natural functions. Ecosystem-Based Management (EBM) uses the principles of sustainability, precaution, adaptation and integration (Boesch 2006) as a guide for better management so we […]

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February 11, 2013

Top ten fish and shellfish symbols: Sharks, rays, fish, crabs and lobster larvae

This is the second blog post in a series which celebrates the IAN symbol library by highlighting some of the most interesting symbols. The first blog was top ten marine flora, since this was the focus of the Marine Botany group at the University of Queensland who began drawing vector symbols. The logical next group […]

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February 6, 2013

The Science/Management Gap

The disconnect between science and policy has its root in the concept of the traditional role of scientists in society. The classic view of the scientist is a researcher who is interested purely in pursuing the truth and is without bias or personal stake in the topic at hand. This role makes the researcher completely […]

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February 4, 2013

Top ten marine flora symbols: Phytoplankton, macroalgae, mangroves and seagrasses

This is the first blog post in a series which celebrates the IAN symbol library by highlighting some of the most interesting symbols. There are currently 2660 symbols in the Integration and Application Network symbol library. This library has grown organically, with new symbols created by talented Science Communicators as they are needed. We have rarely stepped back […]

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