May 26, 2016

How fast can you create and complete a newsletter? In Rio, you only have until tomorrow!

After our first stakeholder workshop at INEA on Monday April 25th, Bill Dennison, Dave Nemazie, and I had to prepare for our expanded workshop of 200 people on Friday April 29th, at the Museum of Tomorrow. This meeting brought together stakeholders from all around Guanabara Bay, and served to not only discuss the report card, but also to talk about governance, management, and restoration in the Bay.

The team outside the Museum of Tomorrow.

The team outside the Museum of Tomorrow.

Participants at the workshop.

Participants at the workshop.

During the Monday workshop we developed a four-page newsletter, which we had translated, reviewed, and printed in only 3 days! This was only possible with the help of Joao Coimbra. Joao is from Brazil, and recently graduated with his Masters from Rice University. He was an intern with KCI and has been working with us on this effort, along with other staff from KCI: Bob Summers and Bruna Carvalho.

Inside spread of the newsletter.

Inside spread of the newsletter.

In addition to passing out the newsletter to workshop attendees, we also distributed a survey for people to fill in. The survey asked for people to write in four words that describe Guanabara Bay. Those words were incorporated into a wordcloud.

The wordcloud describing Guanabara Bay.

The wordcloud describing Guanabara Bay.

The survey also asked people to mark on a map where they live, work, and play. This helps give a sense of place for people to think about the entire Guanabara Bay as well as the watersheds that flow into the Bay. Additionally, while Rio de Janeiro is a huge part of Guanabara Bay, it is not the only influence to the Bay.

Map showing where people live, work, and play.

Map showing where people live, work, and play.

The workshop included talks by Ricardo Piquet (Director of the Museum of Tomorrow), André Corrêa (State Secretary of the Environment), Dora Hees Negreiros (Institute of Guanabara Bay), Pedro Navalón (Consórcio Águas de Barcelona – Labáqua/Aqualogy), and Nair Palhano (KCI). Additionally, Bob Summers and Bill Dennison gave presentations on the state of Guanabara Bay and the Guanabara Bay report card.

State Secretary of the Environment André Corrêa speaking at the event.

State Secretary of the Environment André Corrêa speaking at the event.

Bob Summers speaking about the state of Guanabara Bay (right) and Bill Dennison discussing the report card process (left).

Bob Summers speaking about the state of Guanabara Bay (left) and Bill Dennison discussing the report card process (right).

While a lot of work is occurring to clean up Guanabara Bay, there is a lot to be done as was seen just outside the Museum of Tomorrow.

A trash police officer. His sleeve says “Zero Trash”.

A trash police officer. His sleeve says “Zero Trash”.

A worker picking up trash from a boat in the Bay.

A worker picking up trash from a boat in the Bay with the Museum of Tomorrow in the background.

Overall, both workshops were very successful and helped inform the report card for Guanabara Bay. Positive press coverage about the event also occurred due to the importance of the efforts to restore Guanabara Bay. After the workshop on Friday, we walked to a local bar to celebrate both the Monday and Friday workshops.

Celebrating the promising progress made with some of the Brazilian team members.

Celebrating the promising progress made with some of the Brazilian team members.

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About the author
Alexandra Fries is a Science Communicator at the Integration and Application Network. Alex has a Master of Environmental Management from Duke University.
Website: http://ian.umces.edu/people/Alexandra_Fries/
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