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March 24, 2017

Exploring Hawaii: arid zone ecology, vog and volcanoes

Dave Helweg and Christian Giardina organized a field trip on the Big Island of Hawai’i immediately following our workshop on Oahu. When the plane that Simon Costanzo and I were on landed in Hilo, Christian contacted us to inform me that his wife, Ingrid Dockersmith, had sailed with me aboard the R/V Westward as part […]

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March 22, 2017

Moana Revisited

I enjoyed the University of Hawaii campus. We used the food trucks for lunch on the first day, and ate at the campus food court on the second day. After the first day of the workshop, we enjoyed sitting outside at the campus pub, drinking local Kona Longboard beer and listening to the mynah birds […]

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March 20, 2017

Hawaii ecodrought workshop; trade wind invasions, ridge to reef, endemic species

On 7-8 March, Simon Costanzo and I facilitated an ecodrought workshop at the University of Hawaii at the main campus in Manoa, a suburb of Honolulu. Our host was the Pacific Islands Climate Science Center, headed by Dave Helweg. This Climate Science Center has a huge swath of territory to cover, including American Samoa, the […]

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March 16, 2017

You’ve got to crack a few eggs to make an omelet: Balancing differing worldviews and appealing to stakeholders in environmental management

Dylan Taillie and Annie Carew This past week in our Science for Environmental Management class, students read about three case studies on large, complex ecosystems: New York Harbor, the Mississippi Deltaic Plain and the Great Barrier Reef. Although varying systems, we found commonalities in the issues that many of them face and these commonalities framed much […]

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March 15, 2017

Fresh fruit, virtual land, and conference ribbons: what can we learn from a network perspective?

Kelly Hondula, Natalie Yee After learning about how to construct and interpret social network data sets the previous week, the MEES Coupled Human and Natural Systems class spent a week delving into understanding the types of questions that social and natural scientists investigate using network analysis. We explored social networks of communication, global trade networks, […]

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March 8, 2017

Social Networking: Beyond the Likes and Shares

Natalie Yee and Rachel Eberius Social networks are not just places where we post photos or share updates on our lives. They can be described more broadly to include a series of social interactions and personal relationships. We explored this other definition in class as it related to our work and personal interactions within the […]

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March 2, 2017

The Chesapeake Bay and the Baltic Sea: Adapting to Changing Climates in the New World and the Old

Katie Martin and Hadley McIntosh In J.M. Barrie’s Peter Pan and Wendy, Neverland is a fantastical land—an escape from passing time and reality1. Is returning to the Chesapeake Bay of old with lower turbidity and nutrient levels and a seemingly unlimited oyster and crab harvest an equally unrealistic fantasy? The “Return to Neverland” scenario, coined […]

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February 27, 2017

Ecodrought on the east side of the Pacific Northwest

Simon Costanzo, Brianne Walsh and I traveled to Boise, Idaho for a second workshop with scientists from the Pacific Northwest Climate Science Center. Our first workshop, held in Portland, Oregon, focused on the issues west of the Cascades, and this second workshop focused on issues east of the Cascades. We heard about the three ‘W’s […]

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February 23, 2017

Speaking (scientific) truth to power through storytelling: using lessons from the past and examples from the present to plan for the future

Kavya Pradhan and Alterra Sanchez Like King Arthur’s resolute knights, Environmental Scientists are constantly in their own legendary saga. In our case, instead of the Holy Grail, we are looking for viable strategies for environmental management while taking into consideration the socio-economic and political facets of environmental issues. We strive to find multiple methods that might […]

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February 22, 2017

The Triumph of the Commons: No actually, it can happen!

Rachel Eberius, Krystal Yhap, Suzi Spitzer Man’s tendency to overharvest and exhaust communal goods was first recognized in Garret Harding’s classic 1968 article The Tragedy of the Commons. It is our nature, Harding believed, to act in a rational, self-serving manner and because of this tendency we will inevitably deplete communal environmental resources. In preparation […]

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