Home » Science Communication

March 14, 2017

Talking about Transdisciplinary research in Paris

I attended a ‘Transdisciplinary Research Meeting’, sponsored by the International Council for Science (ICSU), which is part of UNESCO, and is based in Paris. The meeting was at the ICSU facility near the Arc de Triomphe. Our local host was Vivi Stavrou, from the International Social Science Council (ISSC). Participants came from four continents (North and […]

Continue Reading »


March 9, 2017

Rapport over Reports: Next-Generation Science Communicators Learn from Policy Experts on the Front Lines

Ginni La Rosa and Katie Martin Last Friday, February 3rd, UMCES students in the Science for Environmental Management class from multiple campuses across the state gathered together at the IAN synthesis office in Annapolis to speak with two experienced practitioners on the frontier of science and policy decisions. Ben Grumbles was confirmed as Secretary of the Maryland […]

Continue Reading »


March 7, 2017

On the trail of iconic Parisian scientists

Following a three day meeting on transdisciplinary research, I had a day to explore Paris in search of the trails of three of my scientific icons. My eighteenth century science icon from Paris is Antoine-Laurent de Lavoisier (1743-1794); my nineteenth century icon is Louis Pasteur (1822-1895); and my twentieth century icon is Marie Curie (1867-1934). […]

Continue Reading »


March 6, 2017

Transdisciplinary literacy: Seven principles that help define transdisciplinary research

Following a three-day workshop on transdisciplinary research training, held 15-17 Feb 2017 in Paris, France, I reflected on the essential elements of transdisciplinary research. We spent much of our three days talking about what constitutes transdisciplinary research, and many concepts were discussed. This blog attempts to distill some of this discussion and to put forward […]

Continue Reading »


March 2, 2017

The Chesapeake Bay and the Baltic Sea: Adapting to Changing Climates in the New World and the Old

Katie Martin and Hadley McIntosh In J.M. Barrie’s Peter Pan and Wendy, Neverland is a fantastical land—an escape from passing time and reality1. Is returning to the Chesapeake Bay of old with lower turbidity and nutrient levels and a seemingly unlimited oyster and crab harvest an equally unrealistic fantasy? The “Return to Neverland” scenario, coined […]

Continue Reading »


February 27, 2017

Report cards aren’t just for school anymore

Rebecca Wenker and Wilmelie Cruz Marrero After spending a few classes discussing what coupled systems actually are, how they are created, used, managed, and maintained, and various examples of successes and failures, this week we moved onto a topic that has long struck fear into the hearts of students – assessment. More specifically, we delved […]

Continue Reading »


February 23, 2017

Speaking (scientific) truth to power through storytelling: using lessons from the past and examples from the present to plan for the future

Kavya Pradhan and Alterra Sanchez Like King Arthur’s resolute knights, Environmental Scientists are constantly in their own legendary saga. In our case, instead of the Holy Grail, we are looking for viable strategies for environmental management while taking into consideration the socio-economic and political facets of environmental issues. We strive to find multiple methods that might […]

Continue Reading »


February 16, 2017

Science for science, for environment, or society?: The role of science in environmental management

Alterra Sanchez and Stephanie Barletta Environmental management is much more than using science to solve a problem, if only it were that easy! If a lake is becoming eutrophic because of nutrient input due to nearby farming, the answer would be to not allow the farmers to use as much fertilizer; easy, problem solved, right? […]

Continue Reading »


February 15, 2017

One fish, two fish, one fish—wait, where did all the fish go?

Noelle Olsen Last week for class, we traveled near and far (UMES students) to the new UMCES office in Annapolis. Dr. Hubacek gave us an interactive, crash-course lesson in natural resource management and economics by playing the game, Fish Banks. Fish banks originated from the minds of scientists at the MIT Sloan School of Management […]

Continue Reading »


February 13, 2017

The Chesapeake Sentinels

A new paper on Chesapeake Bay Submerged Aquatic Vegetation (SAV) was published last week by colleagues from the Virginia Institute of the Marine Science (VIMS) and University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, led by Jon Lefcheck (VIMS). This paper, entitled “Multiple stressors threaten the imperiled coastal foundation species eelgrass (Zostera marina) in Chesapeake Bay, […]

Continue Reading »


Older Posts »