Home » Science Communication

May 26, 2016

How fast can you create and complete a newsletter? In Rio, you only have until tomorrow!

After our first stakeholder workshop at INEA on Monday April 25th, Bill Dennison, Dave Nemazie, and I had to prepare for our expanded workshop of 200 people on Friday April 29th, at the Museum of Tomorrow. This meeting brought together stakeholders from all around Guanabara Bay, and served to not only discuss the report card, […]

Continue Reading »


May 24, 2016

WebStock 2016 Brings Chesapeake Bay Program Partners into the Creative Process

This month, the Chesapeake Bay Program Creative Team hosted a one-day symposium on all things web for an audience of friends and colleagues. Known as WebStock, the annual event was revitalized last spring as a way for the Creative Team to introduce others to the work they do and the methods they use to do […]

Continue Reading »


May 19, 2016

Bem vindo ao Rio! O primeiro workshop com as partes interessadas da Baía de Guanabara

“Welcome to Rio! The Guanabara Bay first stakeholder workshop“ (Portuguese translation by João Paulo Coimbra) O Rio de Janeiro é um estado brasileiro com cidades vibrantes (incluindo a cidade de mesmo nome) vizinhas à zona costeira da Baía de Guanabara e o Oceano Atlântico. A Baía de Guanabara é um sistema intensamente degradado em virtude […]

Continue Reading »


May 13, 2016

Welcome to Rio! The Guanabara Bay first stakeholder workshop

Rio de Janeiro is a Brazilian State with vibrant cities (including the one with the same name) along the shore of Guanabara Bay and the Atlantic Ocean. Guanabara Bay is highly impacted system due to a large population leading to sewage and trash pollution. The State of Rio and State of Maryland have a partnership […]

Continue Reading »


May 11, 2016

The praxis of science visualization

The Integration and Application Network (IAN) staff recently completed teaching a new course in Science Visualization. This course was part of the Marine, Environmental and Estuarine Science program through the University System of Maryland. Praxis, the word that Aristotle used to mean “thoughtful, practical doing”, refers to the emphasis that this course had on developing […]

Continue Reading »


April 25, 2016

How to organize and run short, productive and fun scientific workshops

The Integration and Application Network (IAN) regularly runs workshops with scientists and resource managers about a variety of topics in a diversity of locations. IAN has evolved various workshop protocols and tools that are regularly applied. There are several aspects that distinguish IAN workshops from typical scientific workshops. All workshop components need to be considered […]

Continue Reading »


April 22, 2016

Workshop on ecological drought with the South Central Climate Science Center in Norman, Oklahoma

In March, Bill Dennison, Simon Costanzo, and I travelled to Norman, Oklahoma for a workshop on ecological drought, part of an ongoing project with the USGS National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center. This was the third in a series of eight workshops to be held at each of the nation’s eight Climate Science Centers […]

Continue Reading »


April 18, 2016

WWF-UMCES Retreats Poetry

This blog is part of the Basin Report Card Initiative: a partnership between the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) and the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science (UMCES) We have had two retreats with our WWF colleagues on the front porch of the DuPont House which serves as the Center Administration for UMCES. The DuPont […]

Continue Reading »


April 11, 2016

How to create conceptual cross-section diagrams

Conceptual cross-section diagrams are a new technique developed by the Integration and Application Network (IAN) team of Science Communicators. This style of conceptual diagrams, using the IAN symbol library, allows for a geographically accurate depiction of coastal waterways. The first use of these cross-section approach was for New York Harbor, developed because of the complex […]

Continue Reading »


March 30, 2016

A great pot does not necessarily make a great dinner: photography techniques to take your science communication to the next level.

Dylan Taillie “Wow, what an awesome photo, did you take that on a Nikon D7000? Something better?” “Wow, what a horrible photo, did you take that with your iPhone or a potato?” These two fictional statements allude to the crux of a lengthy discussion that occurred during this week’s science visualization course. The thought that […]

Continue Reading »


Older Posts »