Hurricane Isabel in Perspective Conference

The conference was a success with many excellent presentations and discussions. The proceedings volume is now available from IAN Press. If you have any Hurricane Isabel resources or comments you'd like to share, please visit our discussion forum.

Mark Trice gave a seminar to summarize the findings presented at the conference. This seminar on Friday 28th January, 2005 at the Chesapeake Bay Program Office, 410 Severn Avenue (Suite 109), Annapolis MD, was part of the IAN Seminar Series. The presentation is available in multimedia (slides and audio) and PDF formats from the IAN Seminar Series page.

November 15 - 17, 2004. Maritime Institute, Linthicum Heights, Maryland

Overview

Hurricane Isabel—a Category 2 hurricane—made landfall between Cape Lookout and Cape Hatteras on North Carolina’s Outer Banks on Thursday, September 18, 2003. Throughout the next several days, Isabel’s destructive effects were felt throughout the heart of the Chesapeake Bay and the entire Mid-Atlantic region. This conference is being organized to discuss the many factors that exacerbated Isabel's impact on the Chesapeake Bay ecosystems and its coastal communities.

For more details on the impacts of sea level rise, land subsidence and ground water extraction on the flooding and damage caused by Hurricane Isabel, visit our Hurricane Isabel and Sea Level Rise page.

Details

Conference Details


Dates:

November 15 - 17, 2004

Cost:

$150 (early bird price - cutoff 15th October)
$200 (full price - after 15th October)
$100 (full-time students)
(includes proceedings, reception, daily continental breakfast, snacks & lunch, and the conference dinner)

Venue:

Maritime Institute Academic Building #3
692 Maritime Boulevard
Linthicum Heights MD (directions)
Phone: 1866 629-3196
(Parking lots A & D are closest)

Conference Flyer:
Downloadable PDF

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Conference Topics

(will include science, management, policy and planning as they relate to the following topics)

  • Coastal flooding
  • Meteorology and hydrodynamics
  • Erosion, sediment inputs
  • Modeling / forecasting
  • Water quality
  • Living resources / habitat
  • Historical, geographic or temporal comparisons
  • Sea level rise / global warming
  • Planning and policy
  • Tools and technologies
  • Coastal geomorphology
  • Federal, state and local coordination

Schedule

Conference Program


November 15
  4.00-7.00 pm Early registration and reception/icebreaker
     
November 16
  8.00-8.30 am Registration
  8.30-10.00 Plenary session in Auditorium
Welcome

Bill Dennison, Integration & Application Network, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science

NOAA report on Isabel
John Sokich, National Weather Service, NOAA

Ecological effects of a recent rise in Atlantic hurricane activity: putting Hurricane Isabel in perspective
Hans Paerl, Institute of Marine Sciences, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Abstract
  10.00-10.15 Morning break (poster session and map gallery)
  10.15-11.30 Plenary session in Auditorium
Forecasting storm surges: Isabel and beyond
Wilson Shaffer, National Weather Service, NOAA
Abstract

Track of the hurricane

Bill Boicourt, Horn Point Laboratory, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science
Abstract

Impacts of Hurricane Isabel on Maryland's tidal water quality and aquatic living resources
Mark Trice, Maryland Dept. of Natural Resources
Abstract
  11.30-1.00 pm Lunch with Hurricane Hunters Video
Dining room
  1.00-2.45 Concurrent session #1
 
1A Planning
Bridge room
  Hazard mitigation: tools, technologies, and opportunities
Session chair
: Zoe Johnson, Maryland Dept. of Natural Resources
 
1B Impacts
Auditorium
  Water quality/phytoplankton
Session chair: Mark Trice, Maryland Dept. of Natural Resources
 
1C Modeling
Room A300
 
Session chair: Kevin Sellner, Chesapeake Research Consortium
  2.45-3.15 Afternoon break (poster session and map gallery)
  3.15-5.00 Concurrent session #2
 
2A Planning
Bridge room
  Management, planning and policy issues: lessons learned
Session chair: Julie LaBranch, Critical Area Commission
 
2B Impacts
Auditorium
  Physics and erosion
Session chair: Lewis Linker, Chesapeake Bay Program
  5.00-6.00 Reception
Dining room
  6.00 Conference dinner with Kent Mountford
Storms: A perspective through Chesapeake history
Abstract
Dining room
     
November 17
  8.30-9.45 am Plenary session in Auditorium
Welcome

Kevin Sellner, Chesapeake Research Consortium and Bill Dennison, Integration & Application Network, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science

The state's response to Isabel
Audrey Scott, Secretary of Planning, Maryland Dept. of Natural Resources

Storm surges and sea level rise: Impacts of higher water level
s
Stephen Leatherman, Laboratory for Coastal Research & International Hurricane Research Center, Florida International University
Abstract
  9.45-10.15 Morning break (poster session and map gallery)
  10.15-11.30 Concurrent session #3
 
3A Planning
Bridge room
  Advances in hazard mitigation mapping
Session chair: Ken Miller, Maryland Dept. of Natural Resources
 
3B Impacts
Auditorium
  Living resources
Session chair: Mark Trice, Maryland Dept. of Natural Resources
 
3C Modeling
Room A300
 
Session chair: Kevin Sellner, Chesapeake Research Consortium
  11.30-1.00 pm Lunch with Mo Lynch
An unprecedented scientific community response to an unprecedented event: Tropical Storm Agnes and the Chesapeake Bay
Abstract
Dining room
  1.00-2.45 Concurrent session #4
 
4A Planning
Bridge room
  Promoting soft approaches to shoreline stabilization: are they effective in storm events?
Session chair: Audra Luscher, Maryland Dept. of Natural Resources
 
4B Impacts
Auditorium
  Sea level rise and landscape
Session chair: Kate Hopkins, Chesapeake Bay Program
  2.45-3.15 Afternoon break (poster session and map gallery)
  3.15-5.00 Panel discussion in Auditorium
Integrating science and management for storms and hurricanes

Moderator: Don Boesch, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science
      Stephen Leatherman, Florida International University
      Carl Hershner, Virginia Institute of Marine Science
      Rich Batiuk, Chesapeake Bay Program
      Dave Lyons, Maryland Dept. of the Environment
      Frank Dawson, Maryland Dept. of Natural Resources
      John Sokich, NOAA
      Ann Swanson, Chesapeake Bay Commission

Session Details

Conference Program


November 16
1A. Planning. Hazard mitigation: tools and opportunities
Session chair: Zoë Johnson, Maryland Dept. of Natural Resources

Federal, state and local governments play an important role in managing both the people and resources needed to prepare for, respond to, and overcome impacts from large storm events. This panel will present and discuss the development, adoption and implementation of federal, state and local plans and programs aimed at hazard planning and response. Plans and programs to be highlighted include the National Flood Insurance Program and Community Rating System, State Hazard Mitigation Planning, Mitigation Grant Funding, City and County Hazard Mitigation Planning, and hazard preparedness planning for federal facilities and the agricultural industry. Kim Golden, Maryland Emergency Management Agency
Rich Sobota, Federal Emergency Management Agency
Peter Conrad, City of Baltimore
Dave Thomas, Baltimore County

Using forecasts to protect federal facilities in the path of Hurricane Isabel
John Govoni
NOAA/NOS/NCCOS-Center for Coastal Fisheries and Habitat Research
Abstract

Hurricane Isabel: an agricultural perspective
Robert Halman, Pamela King, Gilbert Bowling
University of Maryland Cooperative Extension
Abstract

1B. Impacts. Water quality/phytoplankton
Session chair:
Mark Trice, Maryland Dept. of Natural Resources

Impacts of Hurricane Isabel on shallow water quality of the York River estuary
William Reay
and Kenneth Moore
Virginia Institute of Marine Science
Abstract

Impact of Hurricane Isabel on the water properties of the Chesapeake Bay area based on MODIS Aqua and Terra data
Raffaella Matarrese1, Eric Vermote and Michael Kearney2
1. University of Bari. 2. University of Maryland at College Park
Abstract

Algal blooms dynamics in relation to effects of Tropical Storm Isabel
Peter Tango1, Walt Butler1, Mark Trice1, Richard Lacouture2 and Chris Heyer1
1. Maryland Dept. of Natural Resources.
2. Estuarine Research Center, Morgan State University
Abstract

The influence of Hurricane Isabel on Chesapeake Bay phytoplankton dynamics
W.D. Miller, L.W. Harding Jnr., and J.E. Adolf
University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science
Abstract

1C. Modeling and forecasting
Session chair:
Kevin Sellner, Chesapeake Research Consortium

Utilizing a mesocscale model for short-term forecasting during Hurricane Isabel
John Billet and Patrick Maloit
National Weather Service
Abstract

Hurricane Isabel storm surge model simulation for Chesapeake Bay
Lihwa lin, Mary Cialone and Greg Bass
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Abstract

Simulation of Hurricane Isabel using ADCIRC
Jian Shen, Wenping Gong and Harry Wang
Virginia Institute of Marine Science
Abstract

Hindcast simulations of Chesapeake Bay circulation during Hurricane Isabel using a mesoscale coupled atmosphere-ocean model
Liejun Zhong1, Ming Li1, Shunli Zhang2 and Dalin Zhang2
1. University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science
2. University of Maryland at College Park
Abstract

2A. Planning. Management, planning and policy issues: lessons learned
Session chair:
Julie LaBranch, Critical Area Commission

Drawing from the lessons-learned from Isabel, panelists will present an overview of the management, planning, and policy issues they faced during and after Hurricane Isabel. Topics related to regulatory and permit compliance, emergency permitting, tree and vegetation removal, post-storm reconstruction, and public health will be covered. The goal of the panel is to provide a forum to discuss these topics, while exploring methods and exchanging ideas for enhanced planning and preparedness for future natural events.

Panelists will include representatives of federal, state and local agencies, including the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Maryland Departments of Natural Resources and the Environment, the Maryland Critical Area Commission, Dept. of the Environment, the Maryland Board of Public Works, and Baltimore County. Tracy Keefer, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Doldon Moore, Board of Public Works
Pat Farr, Baltimore County

Trees and their impact on electrical reliability during and following Isabel
Michael Galvin
Maryland Dept. of Natural Resources
Abstract

Hurricane preparedness and response for contaminant release
Alan Williams
Maryland Dept. of the Environment
2B. Impacts. Physics and erosion
Session chair:
Lewis Linker, Chesapeake Bay Program

Hurricane Isabel impacts on seagrass beds in the Chesapeake Bay
Bob Orth, Ken Moore, Dave Wilcox and Scott Marion
Virginia Institute of Marine Science
Abstract

Landscape modifications by Hurricane Isabel, Fisherman Island, Virginia
Thomas Allen and George Oertel
Old Dominion University
Abstract

Hurricane Isabel and erosion of Chesapeake Bay shorelines, Maryland
Lamere Hennessee and Jeffrey Halka
Maryland Geological Survey
Abstract

Physical response of the York River estuary to Hurricane Isabel
Lorraine Brasseur, Art Trembanis, John Brubaker, Carl Friedrichs and Todd Nelson
Virginia Institute of Marine Science
Abstract

November 17
3A. Planning. Advances in hazard mitigation mapping
Session chair: Ken Miller, Maryland Dept. of Natural Resources

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) provide an unprecedented opportunity to integrate multiple databases to derive and visualize solutions to difficult and complex emergency management issues and identify hazard mitigation opportunities. Tools, technologies and opportunities for mitigating the impacts of coastal hazards will be presented through panel presentations and discussions. The panel will highlight mitigation tools such as State Hazard Mitigation and elevation (LIDAR) mapping activities, HAZUS modeling, and updating Coastal Floodplains. The panel will include members of federal, state, and academic institutions working on various aspects of hazard mapping. Joe Gavin, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Carrie Capuco, Capuco Consulting
David Sides, Towson University
John Joyce, Maryland Dept. of the Environment

Identifying opportunities for improved accessibility and utilization of coastal hazard data, tools and technologies
Audra Luscher
Maryland Dept. of Natural Resources
Abstract

The future is now in coastal floodplain mapping
Dave Guignet
Maryland Dept. of the Environment
Abstract

3B. Impacts. Living resources
Session chair:
Mark Trice, Maryland Dept. of Natural Resources

Effects of hurricanes on finfish recruitment to Chesapeake Bay
Marcel Montane and Herb Austin
Virginia Institute of Marine Science
Abstract

Effects of Hurricane Isabel on fish populations and communities in Chesapeake Bay
Edward Houde1, John Bichy2 and Sukgeun Jung1
1. University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science
2. North Carolina State University
Abstract

Assessing the impact of Hurricane Isabel on ghost crab (Ocypode quadrat) populations at Cape Hatteras National Seashore, North Carolina
Cynthia Landry, James Perry and Jeffery Shields
Virginia Institute of Marine Science
Abstract

3C. Modeling and forecasting.
Session chair:
Kevin Sellner, Chesapeake Research Consortium

What has been learned from numerical modeling simulations of Hurricane Isabel?
Harry Wang, Joe Cho, Jian Shen, Donelson Wright and William Reay
Virginia Institute of Marine Science
Abstract

Effect of extreme storms on Chesapeake Bay water quality and submerged aquatic vegetation
Ping Wang and Lewis Linker
Chesapeake Bay Program
Abstract

LIDAR mapping of Maryland coastal counties for sea level inundation and storm surge impact - the preliminary Worcester County model
Curtis Larsen and Zoë Johnson
Maryland Dept. of Natural Resources
Abstract

The oceanographic causes of the breaching of Hatteras Island by Hurricane Isabel
Timothy Keen, Clark Rowley and James Dykes
Naval Research Laboratory
Abstract

4A. Planning. Promoting soft approaches to shoreline stabilization: are they effective in storm events?
Session chair:
Audra Luscher, Maryland Dept. of Natural Resources

Alternative approaches to traditional structural control are utilizing “softer”, more natural shoreline treatments by incorporating aspects of living landscape, and minimizing the engineered and structural components of erosion control. Acceptance of these practices is growing and considerable effort is ongoing to increase outreach, exposure, and implementation of these options. As most of the shoreline in the Chesapeake Bay is privately held, property owners can play a major role in assisting with the improvement of water quality and habitat by restoring fringing habitat through “living shoreline” approaches. It is important though, that we determine their effectiveness and communicate monitoring results to the public and shoreline contractors. This panel will discuss alternative approaches, outreach efforts, monitoring studies, and performance in major storm events. Panelists will include representatives from state and non-profit organizations working cooperatively to promote this issue. David Burke, David Burke & Assoc.
Kevin Smith, Maryland Dept. of Natural Resources
Bruce Young, Conservation District
David Wilson, Maryland Eastern Shore Resource, Conservation & Development Council

Impacts of extreme storm events on beaches, tidewater habitats and diamondback terrapins
Marguerite Whilden1, Mary Hollinger1, Kevin Smith2, Jeff Popp3 and Julie Grisar4
1. The Terrapin Institute and Research Consortium
2. Maryland Dept. of Natural Resources
3. Towson State University
4. University of Maryland
Abstract

4B. Impacts. Sea level rise and landscape
Session chair:
Kate Hopkins, Chesapeake Bay Program

Dissecting and classifying the impacts of hurricanes on estuarine systems
J. Court Stevenson1 and Michael Kearney2
1. University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science
2. University of Maryland at College Park
Abstract

Isabel's silent partners: seasonal and secular sea level change
John Boon
Virginia Institute of Marine Science
Abstract

Hurricane Isabel and the forests of the mid-Atlantic Piedmont and Blue Ridge: short-term impacts
Douglas Boucher1, Christine Rodick1, Joyce Bailey2, John Snitzer1 and Kerrie Kyde3
1. Hood College
2. Poolesville HS
3. Maryland Dept. of Natural Resources
Abstract

Response of exotic invasive plant species to forest damage caused by Hurricane Isabel
John Snitzer1, Douglas Boucher1 and Kerrie Kyde2
1. Hood College
2. Maryland Dept. of Natural Resources
Abstract


Storm surge and flood plain map.
Frank McKenzie and Matthew Hedger,
Wicomico County

Flood preparedness coordination with protection of coastal tidal and nontidal wetlands: case study of Deale/Shady Side.
Earl Bradley
Talbot County

Hurricane storm surge maps.
Mark Cohoon

Anne Arundel County

Isabel video.
Steve Taylor

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

Hurricane inundation maps (3-4).
Ken Miller

Hurricane Isabel storm damage and LIDAR derived land elevation (Middle Hooper Island, Shady Side, Piney Point).
Audra Luscher
,
Maryland Dept. of Natural Resources

Eyes on the Bay: tracking Hurricane Isabel’s impacts on Maryland’s water quality.
Chris Heyer
,
Maryland Dept. of Natural Resources

Demonstration of LIDAR mapping of Maryland coastal counties for sea level inundation and storm surge impact - the preliminary Worcester County model.
Inga Clark, Wayne Newell and Roger Barlow,
U.S. Geological Survey

Keynote Bios

Keynote Speaker Biographies

Dr Stephen Leatherman

Stephen P. Leatherman
Chair, Professor and Director
PhD, University of Virginia, 1976
Leatherm@fiu.edu

Dr. Leatherman's major research focus is storm impacts on coastal areas, including high-technology mapping with airborne lasers. He served for many years on the National Academy of Science Post-Storm Disaster Field Team that was dispatched from Washington, DC to survey hurricane damage and thus has considerable first-hand experience with these disasters. Dr. Leatherman has authored or edited 15 books and authored more than 200 refereed journal articles and technical reports. He has provided expert testimony to the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives committees ten times during the past decade on important science policy issues, especially coastal storm impacts and federal response. Dr. Leatherman has given hundreds of invited talks at professional conferences and public workshops. During the last few years, he has received over $5 million in sponsored research. Dr. Leatherman's research has also been widely reported on television programs and in newspapers.

Since 1997, Dr. Leatherman has been the Director of the International Hurricane Research Center as well as the Director for the Laboratory of Costal Research, which is one of the four laboratories at IHRC.

Recent publications:

Leatherman, S.P. (2003). Shoreline change mapping and management along the U.S. east coast. Journal of Coastal Research, Special Issue 38, pp.5-13.

Leatherman, S.P., B. Douglas, and J. LaBrecque (2003). Sea level and coastal erosion require large-scale monitoring. American Geophysical Union EOS, p. 13.

Leatherman, S.P. (2003). Hamptons' hurricane tracking map. Eastern Long Island Coastal Conservation Alliance, Southampton, N.Y., 4 pp.

Leatherman, S.P. (2001). Social and economic costs of sea level rise. In: Sea Level Rise: History and Consequences, Douglas , B., et al., eds., Academic Press, New York, p. 181-223.

Other significant publications:

Carter B., R. Shrestha, and S.P. Leatherman (1998). Airborne laser swath mapping: applications to shoreline mapping. Proceedings of INSMAP Conference, Melbourne , Australia.

Leatherman, S.P. and others (1995). Hurricane Higo's impact on South Carolina coast. Committee on Natural Disaster, National Academy of Science Press, Washington, D.C..

French, G.T. and S.P. Leatherman (1994). The use of GPS in coastal studies. Federal Emergency Management Agency, Washington, D.C.

Leatherman, S.P. (1993). Coastal change. In: Atlas of satellite observation related to local change, R.J. Gurney, et al. eds., Cambridge University Press, pp. 327-339.

Leatherman, S.P. and R.G. Dean (1990) Beach erosion rates and the national flood insurance program. American Geophysical Union EOS Transaction, Vol. 72, pp.9-10.

Professional Presentations

Over 100 speeches at national and international scientific conferences including Antigua, Argentina, Bahamas, Brazil, Canada, China, Denmark, Egypt, England, France, Hong Kong, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Micronesia, Netherlands, Norway, Puerto Rico, Thailand, Venezuela and Wales.

Over 200 public presentations including talks at Meadow Club, Southampton, NY; Chappaquiddick Beach Club, Martha's Vineyard, MA; Ocean Beach Erosion Workshop, San Francisco, CA; Shores and Beaches Workshop, Palm Beach, FL; American Bar Association National Conference, Honolulu, Hawaii.

 

 

Dr Hans Paerl

Hans Paerl
William R. Kenan Professor
Ph.D., University of California-Davis, 1973
Institute of Marine Sciences
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
hpaerl@email.unc.edu

Hans W. Paerl is Kenan Professor of Marine and Environmental Sciences, at the UNC-Chapel Hill Institute of Marine Sciences, Morehead City. His research includes: microbial ecology, nutrient cycling and primary production dynamics of aquatic ecosystems, environmental controls of algal blooms, and assessing the causes and consequences of man-made and climatic (storms, floods) nutrient enrichment and hydrologic alterations of inland, estuarine and coastal waters. His recent studies have identified the importance and ecological impacts of atmospheric nitrogen deposition in estuarine and coastal environments. He was recently (Feb. 2003) awarded the G. Evelyn Hutchinson Award by the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography for his work in these fields and their application to interdisciplinary research, teaching and management of aquatic ecosystems.

Recent representative publications

Paerl, H.W., et al. (2004). Solving problems resulting from solutions: The evolution of a dual nutrient management strategy for the eutrophying Neuse River Estuary, North Carolina , USA. Environmental Science & Technology 38: 3068-3073.

Paerl, H.W., et al. (2003). Phytoplankton photopigments as indicators of estaurine and coastal eutrophication. BioScience 53(10) 953-964.

Paerl, H.W. and T.F. Steppe (2003). Scaling up: The next challenge in environmental microbiology. Environmental Microbiology 5(11): 1025-1038.

Paerl, H.W, R. L. Dennis and D. R. Whitall (2002). Atmospheric deposition of nitrogen: Implications for nutrient over-enrichment of coastal waters. Estuaries 25:677-693.

Paerl, H.W. et al. (2002). Characterizing man-made and natural modifications of microbial diversity and activity in coastal ecosystems: Antonie v Leeuwenhoek 81:487-507.

Paerl, H.W., et al. (2001). Ecosystem impacts of 3 sequential hurricanes (Dennis, Floyd and Irene) on the US 's largest lagoonal estuary, Pamlico Sound, NC . Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, USA. 98(10):5655-5660.

Paerl, H.W. (1998). Structure and function of anthropogenically altered microbial communities in coastal waters. Current Opinion in Microbiology 1:296-302.

Paerl, H.W. et al. (1998). Ecosystem responses to internal and watershed organic matter loading: consequences for hypoxia in the eutrophying Neuse River Estuary , North Carolina , USA . Marine Ecology Progress Series 166:17-25.

Paerl, H. & D. Whitall (1999). Anthropogenically-derived atmospheric nitrogen deposition, marine eutrophication and harmful algal bloom expansion: Is there a link? Ambio 28:307-311.

Paerl, H. W. (1997). Coastal eutrophication and harmful algal blooms: Importance of atmospheric deposition and groundwater as “new” nitrogen and other nutrient sources. Limnology and Oceanography 42:1154-1165.

Synergistic activities

Co-Chair, US-European Conference on Comparative Shallow Water Coastal Ecosystems, Rostock, Germany 1996

Keynote Speaker. “Algal bloom dynamics in aquatic ecosystems: Synergistic physical-chemical controls” Am. Chem. Soc. meeting, San Francisco, Apr. 1997.

Chair, 4th Int. Conference on Toxic Cyanobacteria, Beaufort , NC . Sept. 1998.

Keynote Lecture, 8th Internat. Symp. on Aquatic Microbial Ecology, Taormina , Italy. Oct., 2002.

G. Evelyn Hutchinson Award, Am. Soc. Limnology Oceanography, Salt Lake City, Feb. 2003.

Organizers and Sponsors

Conference Organizers


Conference Sponsors

Contact

Contact

If you have any questions regarding the conference you can email Jane Thomas at jthomas@ca.umces.edu or visit the conference discussion forum. This forum will also provide a post-conference meeting place for discussing the information presented at the conference.