IAN in the Media

This searchable database contains a list of articles published about the Integration and Application Network in the media. It is a subset of the UMCES in the Media database, which allows you to view articles from all University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science laboratories.

Articles can be browsed by date or searched based on words in the title, article text, periodical name, author, or IAN staff quoted. Records link to the original article on the periodical's website (NB These links may not always be available as they are often removed by the periodical a certain time after publication date).

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You are browsing 711 articles from the database of 711 articles. You can browse/search by year/month, and search terms to view other articles.


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Boothbay Register (Maine) (Tue 22 Jan, 2013)
Across the great divide
Staff quoted: Bill Dennison, Judy O'Neil
Article Link Permanent Link

Although they are oceans apart, students from Boothbay Region High School and Australian students will work together as part of a virtual science program in March.


WAMU (NPR) News (Sun 13 Jan, 2013)
Spring Weather Will Determine Chesapeake Bay's Health
Staff quoted: Bill Dennison
Article Link Permanent Link

Some people may be familiar with it — the smell of rainwater in a covered tube. It's a stale, unpleasant smell. And it's similar to what happens at the Chesapeake Bay every summer.


The Bay Net News (Tue 1 Jan, 2013)
O'Malley Signs Order Helping State Prepare For Climate Change and Extreme Weather
Staff quoted: Don Boesch
Article Link Permanent Link

Governor Martin O'Malley has signed a landmark initiative to increase the State's long term resiliency to storm related flooding and sea level rise. He signed the Climate Change and Coast Smart Construction Executive Order, directing that all new and reconstructed state structures, as well as other infrastructure improvements, be planned and constructed to avoid or minimize future flood damage.


Crisfield-Somerset County Times (Mon 31 Dec, 2012)
O'Malley signs order to get state prepared for climate change, extreme weather
Staff quoted: Don Boesch
Article Link Permanent Link

ANNAPOLIS — Governor Martin O'Malley has signed a landmark initiative to increase the State's long term resiliency to storm related flooding and sea level rise. He signed the Climate Change and Coast Smart Construction Executive Order, directing that all new and reconstructed state structures, as well as other infrastructure improvements, be planned and constructed to avoid or minimize future flood damage.


The Baltimore Sun B'More Green Blog (Fri 28 Dec, 2012)
State building changes ordered to avert flood damage - O'Malley calls rise in sea level a threat to public infrastructure
Staff quoted: Don Boesch
Article Link Permanent Link

Declaring that Maryland's coastal areas are increasingly at risk from a rising sea level, Gov. Martin O'Malley has ordered state agencies to weigh the growing risks of flooding in deciding where and how to construct state buildings.


New England Seacoast Online (Sun 16 Dec, 2012)
EPA pact strikes reasonable balance
Article Link Permanent Link

There is reason for optimism for ratepayers and environmental advocates across the Seacoast with the recent agreement between the town of Newmarket and the Environmental Protection Administration over upgrades to the town's wastewater plant.


WAMU (NPR) News (Fri 9 Nov, 2012)
A New Future For Baltimore Harbor?
Staff quoted: Bill Dennison
Article Link Permanent Link

After two centuries of industrial development, Baltimore's hard-edged inner harbor bears no resemblance to the lush wetlands that once covered the port. And technically, the harbor is not safe for diving, or wading, or swimming of any kind. Not by a long shot.


Southern Maryland News (Fri 2 Nov, 2012)
Sandy's path, derecho eased wind damage in region - Summer storm culled weak trees, experts say
Staff quoted: Bill Dennison
Article Link Permanent Link

Hurricane Sandy's path helped spare Maryland the worst of the storm's fury, as the state was exposed to its southern, weaker side. This summer's violent "derecho" storms likely helped as well by bringing down weak trees and spurring utility companies to trim around their lines, said Christopher Strong, a warning coordination meteorologist with the National Weather Service Baltimore-Washington forecast office.


The Baltimore Sun (Tue 30 Oct, 2012)
Storm triggers big Howard sewage spill - Redundant power lines knocked out by falling trees
Staff quoted: Bill Dennison
Article Link Permanent Link

Sandy knocked out power to Howard County's "water reclamation" plant in Savage, causing 20 to 25 million gallons of untreated but rain-diluted human waste to spill into the Little Patuxent River, a branch of one of the Chesapeake Bay's most degraded tributaries. County Executive Ken Ulman called the outage "unacceptable" and called for a "full audit" of how to prevent future overflows.


The Baltimore Sun (Sun 14 Oct, 2012)
Large harbor floating wetland project stirs debate - Marina owner's proposal to develop 1.6-acre marsh draws support, objections
Staff quoted: Bill Dennison
Article Link Permanent Link

If a little green might help restore Baltimore's ailing harbor, how can a lot be bad? That's the question city, state and federal officials are pondering as they weigh a local marina magnate's plan to fill an unused corner of the Inner Harbor with a large floating marsh.



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