IAN in the Media

This searchable database contains a list of articles published about the Integration and Application Network in the media. It is a subset of the UMCES in the Media database, which allows you to view articles from all University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science laboratories.

Articles can be browsed by date or searched based on words in the title, article text, periodical name, author, or IAN staff quoted. Records link to the original article on the periodical's website (NB These links may not always be available as they are often removed by the periodical a certain time after publication date).

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You are browsing 506 articles from the database of 506 articles. You can browse/search by year/month, and search terms to view other articles.


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Science (Fri 29 May, 2009)
Obama Moves to Revitalize Chesapeake Bay Restoration
Staff quoted: Don Boesch
Article Link Permanent Link

With progress stalled for years, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is taking the reins on cleaning up the largest estuary in the United States. It's not going to be easy.


The Ocean Pines Independent (Tue 19 May, 2009)
Report card to give candid view of bays' health
Staff quoted: UMCES
Article Link Permanent Link

In a few weeks the Maryland Coastal Bays Program will host an event to celebrate the release of two important and long-awaited projects - a book focusing on the environmental and cultural changes in the watershed and the first-ever report card grading the health of the coastal bays.


The Baltimore Sun (Tue 12 May, 2009)
O'Malley vows to speed rivers cleanup: Aggressive multistate effort would set deadlines to reduce pollution runoff to bay
Staff quoted: Don Boesch, Bill Dennison
Article Link Permanent Link

With scientists pointing to some bright spots and even a possible "tipping point" in the long-running struggle to restore the Chesapeake Bay, Gov. Martin O'Malley vowed Monday to more than double the pace of cleanup of Maryland's rivers feeding into the troubled estuary.


The Annapolis Capital (Tue 12 May, 2009)
Chesapeake Bay showing signs of recovery: As officials consider new cleanup goals, optimism surfaces about pollution
Staff quoted: Don Boesch, Bill Dennison
Article Link Permanent Link

ABOARD THE R/V RACHEL CARSON - As politicians prepare to set new goals for cleaning up the Chesapeake Bay today, there is a glimmer of evidence that the nation's largest estuary might be recovering some of its key natural functions.


WYPR (NPR) - Maryland Morning Radio Program (Tue 12 May, 2009)
Some Improvement in Maryland River Water Quality
Staff quoted: Bill Dennison
Article Link Permanent Link

Among the depressing reports about the state of the Chesapeake Bay, there is some good news; two rivers in Maryland seem to be improving. Governor Martin O'Malley took a gaggle of reporters on a boat trip yesterday for a look at those rivers and WYPR's Joel McCord was among them.


WJZ (Baltimore) Television (Mon 11 May, 2009)
Governor Examines Chesapeake Tributary (Video)
Staff quoted: Don Boesch, Bill Dennison
Article Link Permanent Link

Good news for the bay can be as scarce as oysters, but there are a few positive signs.


WYPR (NPR) - Maryland Morning Radio Program (Wed 6 May, 2009)
Bountiful Bay Grasses? (Audio)
Staff quoted: Bill Dennison
Article Link Permanent Link

It seems like every month there are new report cards, barometers and checkups on the health of the Chesapeake Bay. But there's really only one way to tell if the bay is getting cleaner: if life is thriving. That seems to be the case at least for aquatic grasses in the bay. A recent study found that bay grasses have made a comeback in some spots. Lee Karrh, a scientist with the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, and Dr. Bill Dennison, vice president for science application at the University of Maryland's Center for Environmental Science, talk with us about the resurgence of bay grasses.


Southern Maryland News (Tue 5 May, 2009)
Commentary - Time to Strengthen Efforts to Clean Up the Bay
Staff quoted: UMCES
Article Link Permanent Link

The Chesapeake Bay is our nation's largest estuary, and Maryland's greatest natural resource. As Chairman of the Water and Wildlife Subcommittee of the Committee on Environment and Public Works, one of my top priorities this year will be to reauthorize the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Chesapeake Bay Program. To that end, I recently held a field hearing in Annapolis to closely examine the effectiveness of the Chesapeake Bay Program and what steps are needed to make it more effective.


The Hampton Roads Daily Press (Sun 3 May, 2009)
Commentary - James River's grade may be tops in class — but it's still mediocre
Staff quoted: UMCES
Article Link Permanent Link

In the last few weeks, there have been a series of report cards issued about the health of the Chesapeake Bay and its tidal tributaries, all reaching the same dire conclusion: The health of our waters is ailing. These findings from the Chesapeake Bay Foundation, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and University of Maryland—each using different methodologies and analyzing different data—are a wake-up call for action against pollution.


Bay Journal (Fri 1 May, 2009)
Report card gives Bay health a C- despite slight improvement: Project finds that best areas are getting better while worst areas are getting worse
Staff quoted: Bill Dennison
Article Link Permanent Link

The Chesapeake Bay scored a C- in the latest report card assembled by a team of Bay scientists. That's the same grade as last year, although the total score edged up a bit from last year's 39 to 43, on a 100-point scale.



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