IAN in the Media

This searchable database contains a list of articles published about the Integration and Application Network in the media. It is a subset of the UMCES in the Media database, which allows you to view articles from all University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science laboratories.

Articles can be browsed by date or searched based on words in the title, article text, periodical name, author, or IAN staff quoted. Records link to the original article on the periodical's website (NB These links may not always be available as they are often removed by the periodical a certain time after publication date).

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You are browsing 489 articles from the database of 489 articles. You can browse/search by year/month, and search terms to view other articles.


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The Annapolis Capital (Wed 22 Oct, 2008)
Severn River facing problems - Experts: State of waterway consistently bad
Staff quoted: UMCES
Article Link Permanent Link

Like the Chesapeake Bay as a whole, the Severn River suffers from dirty runoff from paved surfaces, a loss of beneficial trees and a suffocating lack of oxygen in the water.


The Washington Post (Thu 2 Oct, 2008)
Shrinking Oyster Population Focus of River Summit: Panel Will Discuss Possible Solutions at Solomons Event
Staff quoted: Jack Greer
Article Link Permanent Link

The third annual State of the River Summit scheduled for Oct. 10 at Calvert Marine Museum will focus on the critical decline in the Chesapeake Bay's oyster population.


United Press International (Tue 30 Sep, 2008)
Water Quality Of Chesapeake Getting Worse
Staff quoted: UMCES
Article Link Permanent Link

The polluted Chesapeake Bay is struggling to hold its own, despite 25 years of cleanup efforts, The Baltimore Sun said.


The Baltimore Sun (Sun 28 Sep, 2008)
Tainted Waters: Despite a generation of efforts to clean up the Chesapeake, development and farming along Maryland's rivers still foul the bay
Staff quoted: Walt Boynton, Bill Dennison, Doug Lipton
Article Link Permanent Link

Benedict - Walter Boynton knows all there is to know about the Patuxent River - how to find its guts and marshes, where it shifts from suburban stream into bay-like vastness, when the tide is slack and when it rises.


The Salisbury Daily Times (Fri 5 Sep, 2008)
Report: Nanticoke is in good health
Staff quoted: UMCES
Article Link Permanent Link

SALISBURY -- When Dick Work heard about the Nanticoke River Creekwatchers monitoring program, he and his wife were the first to sign up.


WYPR (NPR) Radio (Fri 29 Aug, 2008)
Examining the Future of the Bay
Staff quoted: Bill Dennison
Article Link Permanent Link

ANNAPOLIS, MD - Throughout the summer, WYPR's Joel McCord has profiled people and events that give the Chesapeake Bay its character. In this final edition of Chesapeake Summer he reminds us that the bay still faces serious problems.


WTOP Radio News (Tue 5 Aug, 2008)
Climate change takes toll on waterways
Staff quoted: Don Boesch, Bill Dennison
Article Link Permanent Link

ANNAPOLIS, Md. - More brown pelicans. More Atlantic croaker. Fewer soft clams. Less eelgrass.


The Annapolis Capital (Sat 2 Aug, 2008)
The Dead Zone
Staff quoted: Bill Dennison
Article Link Permanent Link

There are two dreaded words that pretty much sum up all that's wrong with the Chesapeake Bay: dead zone.


WTOP Radio News (Mon 28 Jul, 2008)
Water clarity murky in Chesapeake
Staff quoted: Bill Dennison
Article Link Permanent Link

CHESAPEAKE BAY, Md. - When Bucky Murphy sets out from Tilghman Island to crab in the Choptank River and Chesapeake Bay, the first thing he notices is the water color.


The Baltimore Sun (Wed 16 Jul, 2008)
More corn seen increasing 'dead zones': Large acreage raises concern for bay, gulf
Staff quoted: Bill Dennison
Article Link Permanent Link

Increasing corn production is expected to spawn an oxygen-starved "dead zone" in the Gulf of Mexico larger than anything seen in 23 years of recordkeeping - an 8,800-square-mile area, roughly the size of New Jersey - researchers said yesterday.



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