IAN in the Media

This searchable database contains a list of articles published about the Integration and Application Network in the media. It is a subset of the UMCES in the Media database, which allows you to view articles from all University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science laboratories.

Articles can be browsed by date or searched based on words in the title, article text, periodical name, author, or IAN staff quoted. Records link to the original article on the periodical's website (NB These links may not always be available as they are often removed by the periodical a certain time after publication date).

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Staff Articles
You are browsing all 275 articles featuring Bill Dennison. You can browse/search by year/month, and search terms to view other articles in the database.


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Boothbay Register (Maine) (Wed 6 Mar, 2013)
Boothbay-Tasmania water project on tap
Staff quoted: Judy O'Neil, Bill Dennison, Simon Costanzo, Adrian Jones
Article Link Permanent Link

"I am so beyond excited," Lauren Graham said last week.


Boothbay Register (Maine) (Tue 22 Jan, 2013)
Across the great divide
Staff quoted: Bill Dennison, Judy O'Neil
Article Link Permanent Link

Although they are oceans apart, students from Boothbay Region High School and Australian students will work together as part of a virtual science program in March.


WAMU (NPR) News (Sun 13 Jan, 2013)
Spring Weather Will Determine Chesapeake Bay's Health
Staff quoted: Bill Dennison
Article Link Permanent Link

Some people may be familiar with it — the smell of rainwater in a covered tube. It's a stale, unpleasant smell. And it's similar to what happens at the Chesapeake Bay every summer.


WAMU (NPR) News (Fri 9 Nov, 2012)
A New Future For Baltimore Harbor?
Staff quoted: Bill Dennison
Article Link Permanent Link

After two centuries of industrial development, Baltimore's hard-edged inner harbor bears no resemblance to the lush wetlands that once covered the port. And technically, the harbor is not safe for diving, or wading, or swimming of any kind. Not by a long shot.


Southern Maryland News (Fri 2 Nov, 2012)
Sandy's path, derecho eased wind damage in region - Summer storm culled weak trees, experts say
Staff quoted: Bill Dennison
Article Link Permanent Link

Hurricane Sandy's path helped spare Maryland the worst of the storm's fury, as the state was exposed to its southern, weaker side. This summer's violent "derecho" storms likely helped as well by bringing down weak trees and spurring utility companies to trim around their lines, said Christopher Strong, a warning coordination meteorologist with the National Weather Service Baltimore-Washington forecast office.


The Baltimore Sun (Tue 30 Oct, 2012)
Storm triggers big Howard sewage spill - Redundant power lines knocked out by falling trees
Staff quoted: Bill Dennison
Article Link Permanent Link

Sandy knocked out power to Howard County's "water reclamation" plant in Savage, causing 20 to 25 million gallons of untreated but rain-diluted human waste to spill into the Little Patuxent River, a branch of one of the Chesapeake Bay's most degraded tributaries. County Executive Ken Ulman called the outage "unacceptable" and called for a "full audit" of how to prevent future overflows.


The Baltimore Sun (Sun 14 Oct, 2012)
Large harbor floating wetland project stirs debate - Marina owner's proposal to develop 1.6-acre marsh draws support, objections
Staff quoted: Bill Dennison
Article Link Permanent Link

If a little green might help restore Baltimore's ailing harbor, how can a lot be bad? That's the question city, state and federal officials are pondering as they weigh a local marina magnate's plan to fill an unused corner of the Inner Harbor with a large floating marsh.


Phys.org (Wed 25 Jul, 2012)
New milestone book documents changes in the south Florida marine ecosystem
Staff quoted: Bill Dennison
Article Link Permanent Link

If you live, vacation, boat, swim, snorkel, bird watch, or eat shellfish in south Florida, you are "connected" to the south Florida marine habitats. A new book, Tropical Connections: South Florida's marine environment, documents the dramatic changes in south Florida's marine ecosystem over the last few decades. Published by IAN Press, it is the culmination of an unprecedented effort to assemble a summary of the status and threats to south Florida marine habitats, a unique environment of the United States that is under severe pressure because of activities related to human development.


EurekAlert! (Wed 25 Jul, 2012)
New milestone book documents changes in the south Florida marine ecosystem - Tropical connections: South Florida's marine environment
Staff quoted: Bill Dennison
Article Link Permanent Link

CAMBRIDGE, MD (July 25, 2012)—If you live, vacation, boat, swim, snorkel, bird watch, or eat shellfish in south Florida, you are "connected" to the south Florida marine habitats. A new book, Tropical Connections: South Florida's marine environment, documents the dramatic changes in south Florida's marine ecosystem over the last few decades. Published by IAN Press, it is the culmination of an unprecedented effort to assemble a summary of the status and threats to south Florida marine habitats, a unique environment of the United States that is under severe pressure because of activities related to human development.


WBOC (Salisbury) Television (Wed 18 Jul, 2012)
Delmarva Drought Helps Clean the Bay
Staff quoted: Bill Dennison
Article Link Permanent Link

The recent drought Delmarva is experiencing is causing crops to die and farmers to struggle. But believe it or not, it is helping clean up the Chesapeake Bay. WBOC's Steve Fisher reports.



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