IAN in the Media

This searchable database contains a list of articles published about the Integration and Application Network in the media. It is a subset of the UMCES in the Media database, which allows you to view articles from all University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science laboratories.

Articles can be browsed by date or searched based on words in the title, article text, periodical name, author, or IAN staff quoted. Records link to the original article on the periodical's website (NB These links may not always be available as they are often removed by the periodical a certain time after publication date).

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Staff Articles
You are browsing all 771 articles featuring Don Boesch. You can browse/search by year/month, and search terms to view other articles in the database.


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Bay Journal (Wed 1 Feb, 2017)
Bay 'Barometer' shows restoration progress, but forest buffers, wetlands lag
Staff quoted: Don Boesch
Article Link Permanent Link

The Chesapeake Bay is showing signs that decades of work are starting to pump new life into the nation's largest estuary, according to a new report, though it also showed worrisome trends for forest buffers and wetlands – two elements considered critical to any long-term recovery.


The Washington Post (Mon 8 Aug, 2016)
We're trashing the oceans — and they're returning the favor by making us sick
Staff quoted: Don Boesch
Article Link Permanent Link

Six years ago, in a bracing TED talk, coral reef scientist Jeremy Jackson laid out "how we wrecked the ocean." In the talk, he detailed not only how overfishing, global warming, and various forms of pollution are damaging ocean ecosystems — but also, strikingly, how these human-driven injuries to the oceans can be harmful to those who live on land.


Bay Journal (Tue 2 Aug, 2016)
Maryland panel agrees to resume Tred Avon oyster restoration
Staff quoted: Don Boesch
Article Link Permanent Link

A Maryland commission last night gave a grudging, conditional nod to going ahead with oyster restoration work in the Tred Avon River, which had drawn fire from the state's watermen. It remains to be seen, however, if the Hogan administration will follow the advisory panel's recommendation, as an Eastern Shore legislator and one seafood industry representative promptly voiced opposition.


Eurasia Review (Thu 28 Jul, 2016)
Cleaner Air May Be Driving Water Quality In Chesapeake Bay
Staff quoted: Don Boesch, Keith Eshleman, Robert Sabo
Article Link Permanent Link

A new study suggests that improvements in air quality over the Potomac watershed, including the Washington, D.C., metro area, may be responsible for recent progress on water quality in the Chesapeake Bay. Scientists from the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science have linked improving water quality in streams and rivers of the Upper Potomac River Basin to reductions in nitrogen pollution onto the land and streams due to enforcement of the Clean Air Act.


Physorg (Tue 26 Jul, 2016)
Cleaner air may be driving water quality in Chesapeake Bay
Staff quoted: Don Boesch, Keith Eshleman, Robert Sabo
Article Link Permanent Link

A new study suggests that improvements in air quality over the Potomac watershed, including the Washington, D.C., metro area, may be responsible for recent progress on water quality in the Chesapeake Bay. Scientists from the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science have linked improving water quality in streams and rivers of the Upper Potomac River Basin to reductions in nitrogen pollution onto the land and streams due to enforcement of the Clean Air Act.


Science Codex (Tue 26 Jul, 2016)
Cleaner air may be driving water quality in Chesapeake Bay
Staff quoted: Don Boesch, Keith Eshleman
Article Link Permanent Link

FROSTBURG, MD (July 26, 2016)--A new study suggests that improvements in air quality over the Potomac watershed, including the Washington, D.C., metro area, may be responsible for recent progress on water quality in the Chesapeake Bay. Scientists from the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science have linked improving water quality in streams and rivers of the Upper Potomac River Basin to reductions in nitrogen pollution onto the land and streams due to enforcement of the Clean Air Act.


Bay Journal (Fri 1 Jul, 2016)
Bay cleanup effort could use a strategic plan like that for the Baltic Sea
Staff quoted: Don Boesch
Article Link Permanent Link

It is hard to believe, but it has been 16 years since I contributed a commentary, "Bay has a lot to learn from European efforts to reduce nutrients," to the Bay Journal (March 2000). I noted, in particular, the efforts of the Baltic Marine Environment Protection Commission, widely known as the Helsinki Commission (HELCOM), was in many ways analogous to the Chesapeake Bay Program.


The Hampton Roads Daily Press (Thu 16 Jun, 2016)
Scientists expect slightly smaller Chesapeake Bay dead zone this summer
Staff quoted: Don Boesch
Article Link Permanent Link

A slight drop in nutrient pollution and river flow from the Susquehanna and Potomac earlier this year likely means a bit smaller dead zone in the Chesapeake Bay this summer.


WBAL (Baltimore) Radio (Thu 16 Jun, 2016)
Scientists: Chesapeake Bay's 'Dead Zone' Smaller This Year
Staff quoted: Don Boesch
Article Link Permanent Link

Officials say there is a smaller than normal "dead zone" in the Chesapeake Bay, as well as clearer water, more bay grasses and an increase in the crab population.


Fox 45 TV (Thu 16 Jun, 2016)
Scientists: Chesapeake Bay's 'dead zone' smaller this year
Staff quoted: Don Boesch
Article Link Permanent Link

BALTIMORE (AP) -- Officials say there is a smaller than normal "dead zone" in the Chesapeake Bay, as well as clearer water, more bay grasses and an increase in the crab population.



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