IAN in the Media

This searchable database contains a list of articles published about the Integration and Application Network in the media. It is a subset of the UMCES in the Media database, which allows you to view articles from all University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science laboratories.

Articles can be browsed by date or searched based on words in the title, article text, periodical name, author, or IAN staff quoted. Records link to the original article on the periodical's website (NB These links may not always be available as they are often removed by the periodical a certain time after publication date).

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Staff Articles
You are browsing all 634 articles featuring Don Boesch. You can browse/search by year/month, and search terms to view other articles in the database.


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CBS Baltimore (Tue 16 Sep, 2014)
Maryland At High Risk As Sea Levels Continue To Rise
Staff quoted: Don Boesch
Article Link Permanent Link

BALTIMORE (WJZ)—A graphic warning for a vulnerable Maryland: the danger is sea level rise coupled with storm surges.


My Eastern Shore MD (Mon 8 Sep, 2014)
Flats may hold key for Bay
Staff quoted: Cassie Gurbisz, Don Boesch, Mike Kemp
Article Link Permanent Link

PERRYVILLE — An early report from an ongoing study of the health of the Upper Bay — specifically the Susquehanna Flats, where the Susquehanna River meets the Chesapeake Bay — indicates that modest reductions in nutrient pollution, coupled with favorable weather conditions, has led to the comeback of underwater grasses there.


RedOrbit (Thu 4 Sep, 2014)
Underwater Grass Comeback Bodes Well For Chesapeake Bay
Staff quoted: Don Boesch, Mike Kemp, Cassie Gurbisz
Article Link Permanent Link

The Susquehanna Flats, a large bed of underwater grasses near the mouth of the Susquehanna River, virtually disappeared from the upper Chesapeake Bay after Tropical Storm Agnes more than 40 years ago. However, the grasses mysteriously began to come back in the early 2000s. Today, the bed is one of the biggest and healthiest in the Bay, spanning some 20 square miles. A new study by scientists at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science explores what's behind this major comeback.


News Medical (Wed 3 Sep, 2014)
Scientists explore reason behind major comeback of underwater grasses
Staff quoted: Mike Kemp, Cassie Gurbisz, Don Boesch
Article Link Permanent Link

The Susquehanna Flats, a large bed of underwater grasses near the mouth of the Susquehanna River, virtually disappeared from the upper Chesapeake Bay after Tropical Storm Agnes more than 40 years ago. However, the grasses mysteriously began to come back in the early 2000s. Today, the bed is one of the biggest and healthiest in the Bay, spanning some 20 square miles. A new study by scientists at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science explores what's behind this major comeback.


Physorg (Tue 2 Sep, 2014)
Underwater grass comeback bodes well for Chesapeake Bay
Staff quoted: Mike Kemp, Cassie Gurbisz, Don Boesch
Article Link Permanent Link

The Susquehanna Flats, a large bed of underwater grasses near the mouth of the Susquehanna River, virtually disappeared from the upper Chesapeake Bay after Tropical Storm Agnes more than 40 years ago. However, the grasses mysteriously began to come back in the early 2000s. Today, the bed is one of the biggest and healthiest in the Bay, spanning some 20 square miles. A new study by scientists at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science explores what's behind this major comeback.


The Washington Post (Sun 31 Aug, 2014)
Large 'dead zone' signals more problems for Chesapeake Bay
Staff quoted: Don Boesch
Article Link Permanent Link

It began forming in May, when heavy spring rains loaded the rivers and creeks with fertilizer washed from farms and suburban lawns. It grew rapidly over the summer, as a broth of chemicals, animal waste and microbes simmered in the warm, slow-moving waters of the Chesapeake Bay.


The Gazette (Wed 6 Aug, 2014)
Data collaborative set to help clean up the Chesapeake
Staff quoted: Tom Miller, Don Boesch
Article Link Permanent Link

For the past decade, the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science has received an increase in data that has the potential to give scientists a better idea of the health of the Chesapeake Bay. Now, UMCES has formed the Environmental Statistics Collaborative, which provides a means to interpret the large amounts of data.


ABC News (Thu 31 Jul, 2014)
Annoying Minor Floods Are Increasing on US Coasts
Staff quoted: Don Boesch
Article Link Permanent Link

Along much of America's coasts, the type of flooding that is more annoying than dangerous has jumped more than fivefold in the last 50 years, the federal government reported Monday.


CBS Baltimore (Tue 29 Jul, 2014)
Annapolis, Baltimore Have Most Nuisance Flooding In The Nation
Staff quoted: Don Boesch
Article Link Permanent Link

BALTIMORE (WJZ)— Nuisance flooding is the high water that swamps streets and sidewalks during storms. It's a growing problem for coastal cities.


The Washington Post (Mon 28 Jul, 2014)
Annoying minor floods are increasing on US coasts
Staff quoted: Don Boesch
Article Link Permanent Link

WASHINGTON — Along much of America's coasts, the type of flooding that is more annoying than dangerous has jumped more than fivefold in the last 50 years, the federal government reported Monday.



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