IAN in the Media

This searchable database contains a list of articles published about the Integration and Application Network in the media. It is a subset of the UMCES in the Media database, which allows you to view articles from all University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science laboratories.

Articles can be browsed by date or searched based on words in the title, article text, periodical name, author, or IAN staff quoted. Records link to the original article on the periodical's website (NB These links may not always be available as they are often removed by the periodical a certain time after publication date).

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Staff Articles
You are browsing all 673 articles featuring Don Boesch. You can browse/search by year/month, and search terms to view other articles in the database.


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The Times - Picayune (Mon 10 Nov, 2014)
Consequences of climate change discussed by French, U.S. experts at Tulane
Staff quoted: Don Boesch
Article Link Permanent Link

The consequences of climate change must be dealt with by the world's governments through both reduction of greenhouse gases and finding ways to adapt to the changes that are sure to come, concluded members of scientific and economic panels participating in the French Ameri-Can Climate Talks at Tulane University on Monday (Nov. 10).


Star Tribune (Mon 10 Nov, 2014)
Climate change magnifies dead zone woes in world waterways and it'll get worse, study says
Staff quoted: Don Boesch
Article Link Permanent Link

WASHINGTON — Global warming is likely playing a bigger role than previously thought in dead zones in oceans, lakes and rivers around the world and it's only going to get worse, according to a new study.


CTV News (Canada) (Mon 10 Nov, 2014)
Smithsonian: global waterway 'dead zones' getting worse thanks to climate change
Staff quoted: Don Boesch
Article Link Permanent Link

WASHINGTON -- Global warming is likely playing a bigger role than previously thought in dead zones in oceans, lakes and rivers around the world and it's only going to get worse, according to a new study.


AOL (Mon 10 Nov, 2014)
Study: Global warming worsening watery dead zones
Staff quoted: Don Boesch
Article Link Permanent Link

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Global warming is likely playing a bigger role than previously thought in dead zones in oceans, lakes and rivers around the world and it's only going to get worse, according to a new study.


CBC News (Canada) (Mon 10 Nov, 2014)
Global warming increasing spread of dead zones in oceans, rivers
Staff quoted: Don Boesch
Article Link Permanent Link

Global warming is likely playing a bigger role than previously thought in dead zones in oceans, lakes and rivers around the world and it's only going to get worse, according to a new study.


News & Record (Mon 10 Nov, 2014)
Study: Global warming worsening watery dead zones
Staff quoted: Don Boesch
Article Link Permanent Link

WASHINGTON — Global warming is likely playing a bigger role than previously thought in dead zones in oceans, lakes and rivers around the world and it's only going to get worse, according to a new study.


Capital Gazette (Mon 3 Nov, 2014)
South River grasses a 'story about resilience'
Staff quoted: Don Boesch, Cassie Gurbisz
Article Link Permanent Link

A patch of grasses in the South River is flourishing thanks to more stable, improving water quality credited with the resurgence of crucial bay grasses in the Chesapeake Bay's Susquehanna Flats, scientists say.


National Resources & Environment (Sat 1 Nov, 2014)
Interview - Dr. Donald Boesch
Staff quoted: Don Boesch
Article Link Permanent Link

Dr. Boesch is a professor of marine science and president of the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, a part of the twelve-institution university system of Maryland.


Mother Nature Network (Tue 28 Oct, 2014)
The disappearing oyster population of Chesapeake Bay: Could 3 million year old fossils hold the key to saving this valuable resource?
Staff quoted: Don Boesch
Article Link Permanent Link

Oysters have long been seen as an inexhaustible resource, harvested throughout the years without concern for consequences. According to Mike Naylor, shellfish program manager at the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, the oyster population in the Chesapeake Bay is now at barely 1 percent of what it had been in the past. This is troublesome because oysters play a critical part in the ecosystem of the Bay, serving as a filtration system and also drawing associated organisms that create a community of filters and filter feeders.


Bay Journal (Thu 2 Oct, 2014)
Bay scientists present Governor O'Malley their highest award
Staff quoted: Don Boesch
Article Link Permanent Link

Earlier this week, the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science bestowed one of its most prestigious awards on Gov. Martin O'Malley for his environmental leadership.



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