IAN in the Media

This searchable database contains a list of articles published about the Integration and Application Network in the media. It is a subset of the UMCES in the Media database, which allows you to view articles from all University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science laboratories.

Articles can be browsed by date or searched based on words in the title, article text, periodical name, author, or IAN staff quoted. Records link to the original article on the periodical's website (NB These links may not always be available as they are often removed by the periodical a certain time after publication date).

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Staff Articles
You are browsing all 593 articles featuring Don Boesch. You can browse/search by year/month, and search terms to view other articles in the database.


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The Washington Post (Tue 17 Feb, 2009)
Scientists Warn of Persistent 'Dead Zones' in Bay, Elsewhere
Staff quoted: Don Boesch, Michael Kemp
Article Link Permanent Link

CHICAGO -- Healing low-oxygen aquatic "dead zones" in the Chesapeake Bay and hundreds of other spots worldwide will be trickier than previously imagined, leading scientists on the issue said Sunday.


Washington Post News Service (Tue 17 Feb, 2009)
Aquatic 'dead zones' persistent, scientists say: Excess nutrients from runoff reduce oxygen, killing nutrient-removing organisms, creating a cycle that makes it harder to breathe life into damaged areas in the Gulf of Mexico, Chesapeake Bay and else
Staff quoted: Don Boesch, Michael Kemp
Article Link Permanent Link

Chicago -- Healing low-oxygen aquatic dead zones in the Chesapeake Bay and hundreds of other spots worldwide will be trickier than previously imagined, according to leading scientists on the issue.


Washington Post News Service (Mon 16 Feb, 2009)
Decision day looms on new oyster for Chesapeake Bay: Eastern oysters have dropped 99 percent below historic levels from overfishing and disease.
Staff quoted: Don Boesch
Article Link Permanent Link

Sometime in the next few days, three men will make a decision that comes awfully close to playing God with the Chesapeake Bay.


The Washington Post (Sun 15 Feb, 2009)
Oyster Decision Could Alter Bay: Officials Weighing Proposal to Add Asian Species
Staff quoted: Don Boesch, Mutt Meritt
Article Link Permanent Link

Sometime in the next few days, three men will make a decision that comes awfully close to playing God with the Chesapeake Bay.


The Baltimore Examiner (Tue 27 Jan, 2009)
Donald Boesch, Shari Wilson join climate change panels
Staff quoted: Don Boesch
Article Link Permanent Link

Donald Boesch, president of the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, is participating in a major study on climate change by the National Academies of Science and Engineering. Boesch, of Annapolis, serves on the overall coordinating committee that will write the final report based on the work of four separate panels. He is one of seven Maryland residents selected to work on this two-year congressionally mandated study, which will investigate and make recommendations on the issues related to global climate change.


WYPR (NPR) - Maryland Morning Radio Program (Tue 27 Jan, 2009)
California, Here We Come (Audio)
Staff quoted: Don Boesch
Article Link Permanent Link

President Obama yesterday made moves that would tighten greenhouse-gas emission regulations in 14 states led by California and including Maryland--one of a couple actions that signal a change in environmental policy from the Oval Office. We ask Donald Boesch, president of the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science and a member of a congressional Climate change research group, if environmental regulation is on a roll, and what it could mean locally.


The Annapolis Capital (Sun 18 Jan, 2009)
Mid-Atlantic not ready for sea-level rise
Staff quoted: Don Boesch
Article Link Permanent Link

Maryland and other Mid-Atlantic states need to do a better job of preparing for sea-level rise if climate change is as intense as scientists think it will be, according to a new federal report.


The Baltimore Sun (Sat 17 Jan, 2009)
EPA: Climate change will have big effect on Md. coastal erosion
Staff quoted: Don Boesch
Article Link Permanent Link

Climate change will produce a sharp increase in storm-related flooding and coastal erosion over the next century in Maryland and the rest of the mid-Atlantic coastal states, affecting both natural and human communities, the federal government said in a report released yesterday.


The Baltimore Examiner (Sat 17 Jan, 2009)
Maryland's coastal protection laws addressing rising sea level
Staff quoted: Don Boesch
Article Link Permanent Link

Maryland's push to protect Chesapeake Bay aquatic life and improve water quality also serves to prepare the state for the effects of rising sea levels, according to a federal report released Friday.


WAMU (NPR) - The Kojo Nnamdi Show (Thu 8 Jan, 2009)
Chesapeake Check-Up
Staff quoted: Don Boesch
Article Link Permanent Link

A coalition of environmentalists is suing the federal government over the slow pace of Chesapeake Bay restoration. Local chicken farmers are unhappy about new regulations. And bleak state budget numbers present an uncertain future for clean-up programs. We examine the most recent news affecting the Bay.



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