IAN in the Media

This searchable database contains a list of articles published about the Integration and Application Network in the media. It is a subset of the UMCES in the Media database, which allows you to view articles from all University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science laboratories.

Articles can be browsed by date or searched based on words in the title, article text, periodical name, author, or IAN staff quoted. Records link to the original article on the periodical's website (NB These links may not always be available as they are often removed by the periodical a certain time after publication date).

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Staff Articles
You are browsing all 123 articles featuring Mike Roman. You can browse/search by year/month, and search terms to view other articles in the database.


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United Press International (Tue 20 Mar, 2012)
Oil from gulf disaster found in food chain
Staff quoted: Mike Roman
Article Link Permanent Link

CAMBRIDGE, Md., March 20 (UPI) -- Oil from the 2010 Deepwater Horizon disaster entered the food chain in the Gulf of Mexico through zooplankton, the tiniest of organisms, researchers say.


Science Daily (Tue 20 Mar, 2012)
Oil from Deepwater Horizon Disaster Entered Food Chain in the Gulf of Mexico
Staff quoted: Mike Roman, Jamie Pierson
Article Link Permanent Link

ScienceDaily (Mar. 20, 2012) — Since the explosion on the BP Deepwater Horizon drilling rig in the Gulf of Mexico on April 20, 2010, scientists have been working to understand the impact that this disaster has had on the environment. For months, crude oil gushed into the water at a rate of approximately 53,000 barrels per day before the well was capped on July 15, 2010. A new study confirms that oil from the Macondo well made it into the ocean's food chain through the tiniest of organisms, zooplankton.


Science Newsline (Tue 20 Mar, 2012)
Study Confirms Oil from Deepwater Horizon Disaster Entered Food Chain in the Gulf of Mexico
Staff quoted: Mike Roman
Article Link Permanent Link

Since the explosion on the BP Deepwater Horizon drilling rig in the Gulf of Mexico on April 20, 2010, scientists have been working to understand the impact that this disaster has had on the environment. For months, crude oil gushed into the water at a rate of approximately 53,000 barrels per day before the well was capped on July 15, 2010. A new study confirms that oil from the Macondo well made it into the ocean's food chain through the tiniest of organisms, zooplankton.


Democratic Underground (Tue 20 Mar, 2012)
Study confirms oil from Deepwater Horizon disaster entered food chain in the Gulf of Mexico
Staff quoted: Mike Roman
Article Link Permanent Link

CAMBRIDGE, MD (March 20, 2012)—Since the explosion on the BP Deepwater Horizon drilling rig in the Gulf of Mexico on April 20, 2010, scientists have been working to understand the impact that this disaster has had on the environment. For months, crude oil gushed into the water at a rate of approximately 53,000 barrels per day before the well was capped on July 15, 2010. A new study confirms that oil from the Macondo well made it into the ocean's food chain through the tiniest of organisms, zooplankton.


SciTechDaily (Tue 20 Mar, 2012)
Traces of Oil from Deepwater Horizon May Work Their Way up the Food Chain
Staff quoted: Mike Roman
Article Link Permanent Link

CAMBRIDGE, Maryland (March 20, 2012) — Since the explosion on the BP Deepwater Horizon drilling rig in the Gulf of Mexico on April 20, 2010, scientists have been working to understand the impact that this disaster has had on the environment. For months, crude oil gushed into the water at a rate of approximately 53,000 barrels per day before the well was capped on July 15, 2010. A new study confirms that oil from the Macondo well made it into the ocean's food chain through the tiniest of organisms, zooplankton.


Physorg (Tue 20 Mar, 2012)
Study confirms oil from Deepwater Horizon disaster entered food chain in the Gulf of Mexico
Staff quoted: Mike Roman, Jamie Pierson
Article Link Permanent Link

Since the explosion on the BP Deepwater Horizon drilling rig in the Gulf of Mexico on April 20, 2010, scientists have been working to understand the impact that this disaster has had on the environment. For months, crude oil gushed into the water at a rate of approximately 53,000 barrels per day before the well was capped on July 15, 2010. A new study confirms that oil from the Macondo well made it into the ocean's food chain through the tiniest of organisms, zooplankton.


Newsroom America (Tue 20 Mar, 2012)
Study Confirms Oil From Deepwater Horizon Disaster Entered Food Chain
Staff quoted: Mike Roman
Article Link Permanent Link

(Newsroom America) -- Since the explosion on the BP Deepwater Horizon drilling rig in the Gulf of Mexico on April 20, 2010, scientists have been working to understand the impact that this disaster has had on the environment.


The Salt Lake Tribune (Fri 17 Feb, 2012)
At desert's edge, oceans groups to gather in Salt Lake City
Staff quoted: Mike Roman
Article Link Permanent Link

Salt Lake City might seem like a strange place for ocean experts from around the world to gather for their biennial meeting. After all, the Great Salt Lake doesn't really count as an ocean, and the Pacific is several hundred miles away.


Chesapeake Bay Journal (Sat 1 Oct, 2011)
Storms leave trail of debris, sediments in their wake - Scientists say it is too early to tell full impact of flooding
Staff quoted: Walt Boynton, Mike Roman
Article Link Permanent Link

From streams whose banks were shredded by floodwaters in New York, to a cascade of chocolate-brown water that spread halfway down the Chesapeake, severe late summer weather delivered a heavy blow to the Bay and its watershed.


The Star Democrat (Fri 30 Sep, 2011)
Low oxygen, debris found in Bay study - Influx of fresh water a factor, researcher says
Staff quoted: Mike Roman
Article Link Permanent Link

CAMBRIDGE Fresh water from recent storms has created low oxygen zones from north of the Bay Bridge to south of the Patuxent River, Mike Roman, Horn Point laboratory director, said Thursday.



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