Project Details - All Projects > Partner - Horn Point Laboratory


Current Projects


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HPL & NSF Coastal SEES: OysterFutures Permanent Link
The goal of OysterFutures is to develop recommendations for oyster policies and management that meet the needs of industry, citizen, and government stakeholders in the Choptank and Little Choptank Rivers.  Full Details  



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IAN: Science Communication Courses Permanent Link
A keystone of the Integration and Application Network is effectively communicating science to a broad audience. This one- to three-day course provides participants with a science communication toolbox for effectively communicating their data. At the close of the course, participants will have learned the principles of effective science communication, used hands-on sessions to create their own products (symbols, conceptual diagrams, presentations, newsletters, posters), and gained experience in relevant software programs. These courses are made up of modules and can be tailored to meet the needs of any interested funding agency.  Full Details  



Past Projects


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COSEE Coastal Trends: online teaching modules Permanent Link
COSEE Coastal Trends increases public awareness about ocean science, empowers educators by developing interactive online modules, and fosters partnerships between researchers and educators in order to make current scientific knowledge and data available in the classroom.  Full Details  



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HPL: Chesapeake Bay SAV restoration Permanent Link
Chesapeake Bay has historically supported extensive bay grass (underwater grasses) meadows (>75,000 ha). However, water quality degradation from increased sediment and nutrient inputs has reduced the areal coverage and depth penetration of bay grasses, with one third of historical distributions remaining (21,648 ha; 1985-2004 mean). Chesapeake Bay underwater grasses are comprised of a variety of freshwater, brackish, and marine species. These various species form different communities, largely related to salinity, which have different environmental factors limiting their effective restoration.  Full Details  



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HPL: Conowingo Impact Research Permanent Link

University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science has been awarded a grant from Exelon Corporation through the Department of Natural Resources to study the affect that particulates from Conowingo Reservoir have on water quality in regions affected by high flow events. This is a two-year research project that began in October of 2014, the results are highly anticipated and will play a huge roll in future management of the sediment in Conowingo Reservoir.   Full Details  




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NOAA ECOHAB: Karenia Nutrient Dynamics in the Eastern Gulf of Mexico Permanent Link
Native to the Gulf of Mexico, Karenia brevis is a toxic dinoflagellate that blooms almost annually off the west coast of Florida. K. brevis blooms are not a new phenomenon on the west Florida shelf, and ships' logs suggest bloom-related events (fish kills) dating back to the 1500s. Coastal regions of Florida have experienced some of the most rapid population growth and development in the United States. Beach clean-ups, tourism-related losses, medical expenses, and lost work days during red tide events can average over a million dollars lost annually. This is a five year, multi-insitutional research program designed to utilize scientific expertise in a collaborative laboratory, field, and modeling program. The study aimed to identify the diverse interannual physical, chemical, and biological conditions that are responsible for K. brevis blooms on the west Florida shelf.  Full Details