IAN Seminar Series 2016

The goal of the IAN seminar series is to provide concise, thought-provoking ideas relating to Chesapeake Bay science and management. Short presentations (15 minutes maximum length) are immediately followed by a lunchtime discussion of the topics raised by the presenter. The discussion is summarized and is posted along with a pdf version of the seminar slides. The seminars are captured on video and posted under a Creative Commons license so they can be freely shared.

Email Icon Subscribe to receive email reminders prior to each seminar, and when new seminars are available online.

iCal Subscribe Icon Subscribe to the iCalendar for the 2016 seminar series.

RSS Feed Icon Subscribe to our Seminar Series RSS Feed.

iTunes Icon Subscribe, or paste http://ian.umces.edu/seminarseries/seminarseries.xml into your podcasting software.

Online Seminar Archives


Select Year

Or Enter Search Term



Search Results
You are viewing 7 seminars from the database of 110 seminars. You can browse/search by year, and search terms to view other seminars.


DateSpeakerSeminarSeries
Thu 26
May
http://ian.umces.edu/seminarseries/
SAV Monitoring Program - Sustainability and funding challenges - Brooke Landry (CBP SAV Workgroup) - IAN Seminar Series
2016-05-26T12:00:00-04:00 2016-05-26T13:00:00-04:00
Macknis Room, Chesapeake Bay Program Office, 410 Severn Avenue (Suite 109), Annapolis MD

Since the early 1980s, the Virginia Institute of Marine Science, with the support of the Chesapeake Bay Program partnership, and with funding from the EPA and other local, state, and federal partners, has lead an annual Bay-wide SAV monitoring effort using data interpreted from aerial imagery integrated with ground survey data. The program has evolved over the past three decades to become the most successful large-scale, consistent, long-term SAV monitoring program in the world. Because of the program’s endurance and reliability of data, SAV scientists and managers in the Chesapeake Bay watershed have grown to rely on the data for a variety of purposes. With that said, the ability to identify and secure diverse and sustainable sources of long-term funding for the program have not been successful in the past several years. The program itself has become more expensive over the years as the quantity of data and level of detail, accuracy, and staff expertise have increased, while simultaneously the number and diversity of funding partners has declined significantly over the life of the survey, with increased EPA funds making up the difference over the past decade. VIMS recently and successfully re-competed for the SAV aerial survey grant from the EPA and therefore has EPA funding for the next six years. They are, however, still short on funding from additional partners (it\'s set up as a cooperative agreement). The program is approximately $100,000 per year deficient in funds and under threat of ending if additional financial partners aren\'t secured.

Brooke Landry
CBP SAV Workgroup
brooke.landry@maryland.gov
SAV Monitoring Program - Sustainability and funding challenges Permanent Link

Science for Citizens
ian logo
Thu 26
May
http://ian.umces.edu/seminarseries/
Submerged Aquatic Vegetation (SAV) Update - The Future of Annual Baywide Monitoring - Robert J. Orth (VIMS) - IAN Seminar Series
2016-05-26T12:00:00-04:00 2016-05-26T13:00:00-04:00
Macknis Room, Chesapeake Bay Program Office, 410 Severn Avenue (Suite 109), Annapolis MD

Chesapeake Bay support a diverse assemblage of 10-15 species of submersed aquatic vegetation (SAV) whose distributions are generally constrained by salinity. Two species are found in the higher salinity areas with the remaining species found in the lower salinity and freshwater areas of the region. Because of their sensitivity to water quality changes, SAV are being used by resource managers as a sentinel group to reflect management efforts to improve water quality in this region.

An annual aerial SAV monitoring program has been conducted throughout the Chesapeake Bay and the Delmarva Coastal Bays on an annual basis from 1984 through 2015, except for 1988. Black and white photography was acquired at a scale of 1:24,000, following acquisition timing guidelines that optimize visibility of SAV beds with digital imagery used in 2015. Approximately 170 flight lines were flown each year between May and October, yielding over 2,000 photographs or digital images.

Since the 1984, SAV has exhibited long-term (decadal) increases and decreases, as well as some large, single-year changes. Current SAV coverage for almost all segments in the Chesapeake Bay remain below established restoration targets based on historical coverages for each region, indicating that SAV abundance and associated ecosystem services are currently limited by continued poor water quality, and more recently high summertime temperatures for species in the higher saline regions which also has the potential to alter the species distribution in this region. Results are used often in regulatory matters in the Bay, e.g. aquaculture permits,dredging, dock construction. The utility of the survey results are most important in the state regulatory hierarchy as the results are used to assess improving water quality conditions in the Bay.

Robert J. Orth
VIMS
jjorth@vims.edu
Submerged Aquatic Vegetation (SAV) Update - The Future of Annual Baywide Monitoring Permanent Link

Science for Citizens
ian logo
Thu 26
May
http://ian.umces.edu/seminarseries/
Modeling the Impacts of Water Quality on SAV in the Tidal Chesapeake Bay - Richard Zimmerman (ODU) - IAN Seminar Series
2016-05-26T12:00:00-04:00 2016-05-26T13:00:00-04:00
Macknis Room, Chesapeake Bay Program Office, 410 Severn Avenue (Suite 109), Annapolis MD

Although environmental requirements of submerged aquatic vegetation have been studied for years, reliable metrics for predicting their response to current or future conditions remain elusive. The combined effects of temperature, CO 2 , and light availability controlled by water quality and epiphytes were explored using GrassLight, a bio-optical model that provided a predictive environment for evaluating the interaction of multiple stressors on SAV distribution and density across the submarine landscape of the Chesapeake Bay. Model predictions were validated against in situ measures of spectral diffuse attenuation, SAV density and distribution. The potential for photosynthesis stimulated by ocean acidification to mitigate the effects of high summer temperature, water quality and epiphyte load on SAV populations growing near the southern limit of their distribution were explored. The model accurately reproduced the submarine light environment from measured water quality parameters, and predicted their impacts on SAV distributions throughout the Bay. It also reproduced the negative effects of warm summer temperatures on eelgrass (Zostera marina L.) distribution in the southern Bay, and demonstrated that CO 2 increases projected for the next century should stimulate photosynthesis sufficiently to offset the negative effects of thermal stress, even in the presence of epiphytes. Thus, improved water quality should facilitate the survival of SAV populations in Chesapeake region, even in the face of a warming climate.

Richard Zimmerman
ODU
rzimmerm@odu.edu
Modeling the Impacts of Water Quality on SAV in the Tidal Chesapeake Bay Permanent Link

Science for Citizens
ian logo
Thu 28
Apr
http://ian.umces.edu/seminarseries/
Monitoring, Modeling, and Research as part of the Baltimore Urban Waters Initiative - Emily Majcher (USGS MD-DE-DC Water Science Center) - IAN Seminar Series
2016-04-28T12:00:00-04:00 2016-04-28T13:00:00-04:00
Macknis Room, Chesapeake Bay Program Office, 410 Severn Avenue (Suite 109), Annapolis MD
The National Urban Waters Federal Partnership is comprised of 13 Federal Departments, including the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), and U.S. Department of the Interior, among others. The Urban Waters Federal Partnership, formally launched in Baltimore in 2011, was developed to reconnect economically underserved urban communities with their waterways by improving coordination among federal agencies and organizations at all levels of government. The USDA Forest Service is the lead agency on the Baltimore Urban Waters Federal Partnership (BUWP). The BUWP has organized with many local agencies and organizations to develop plans and strategic actions in four topical areas with subcommittees for each over the last five years: (1) Local restoration and best management projects, (2) Spatial mapping information and tools, (3) The Green Pattern Book, and (4) Monitoring, modeling, and research. The goals of the Monitoring, Modeling, and Research topic subcommittee are to enhance communication between partners on monitoring needs, and provide technical leadership on water-related issues such as improved water quality, flood hazards, and water supply in urban areas. The subcommittee has hosted two workshops (summer 2014, late winter 2016) for the water monitoring community that inventoried monitoring assets in the Baltimore region and identified data gaps and provided recommendations for follow up. From these recommendations, a collaborative retrospective trends analysis project was proposed and funded to specifically address some of the high priority data gaps identified during the 2014 workshop. The 2016 workshop was organized to provide a feedback loop from researchers to practitioners in specific areas of interest identified via surveys of the attendants, and also to allow for feedback from jurisdictions to researchers and practitioners to identify areas of need and possible collaboration.
Emily Majcher
USGS MD-DE-DC Water Science Center
emajcher@usgs.gov
Monitoring, Modeling, and Research as part of the Baltimore Urban Waters Initiative Permanent Link

Science for Citizens
ian logo
Thu 24
Mar
http://ian.umces.edu/seminarseries/
Targeting Behaviors Around the Bay: Where to aim? - Caroline Donovan (UMCES IAN) - IAN Seminar Series
2016-03-24T12:00:00-04:00 2016-03-24T13:00:00-04:00
Macknis Room, Chesapeake Bay Program Office, 410 Severn Avenue (Suite 109), Annapolis MD

Who’s willing to change their behaviors in the interest of Chesapeake Bay health? Limited by financial constraints, it may be ideal for watershed organizations to focus their stewardship and educational initiatives on actions most likely adopted by their constituents. The Bay Survey, hosted online between 2013-2015, asked participants questions about stewardship practices in and around their homes.  The survey found that more people are likely to plant a rain garden if provided with help financially; most people do not have a rain barrel, but those who do have them installed and hooked up; and, there is an equal likelihood people will install rain barrels as rain gardens at their home. These are just a few of the results that will be presented during this seminar. This presentation looks at the results of The Bay Survey in Maryland and compares the counties with the best return rates (Anne Arundel and Dorchester).

Caroline Donovan
UMCES IAN
cdonovan@umces.edu
Targeting Behaviors Around the Bay: Where to aim? Permanent Link

Science for Citizens
ian logo
Thu 25
Feb
http://ian.umces.edu/seminarseries/
USGS Watershed Monitoring Results  - Doug Moyer (USGS) - IAN Seminar Series
2016-02-25T12:00:00-05:00 2016-02-25T13:00:00-05:00
Macknis Room, Chesapeake Bay Program Office, 410 Severn Avenue (Suite 109), Annapolis MD

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), as a partner of the Chesapeake Bay Program, is responsible for determining the extent to which nitrogen, phosphorus, and suspended-sediment loads delivered to bay from the monitored-nontidal portions of the bay watershed. This is accomplished by analyzing water-quality observations from the nine River-Input Monitoring (RIM) stations to estimate nitrogen, phosphorus, and suspended-sediment annual loads and trends using Weighted Regressions on Time, Discharge, and Season (WRTDS). The resulting trends in nitrogen, phosphorus, and sediment loads are flow normalized to account for the year-to-year variation in river discharge; thus, the remaining trend is a result of changing sources, delays associated with storage or transport of historical inputs, and/or implemented reduction strategies.

Nitrogen, phosphorus, and suspended-sediment loads are showing measurable improvement at many locations across the bay watershed from 2005 to 2014. Trends in nitrogen loads are improving at 44 of 81 (54 percent) NTN stations analyzed. The median reduction in nitrogen load, for these 44 NTN stations, is 0.68 pounds per acre or 10 percent. Trends in phosphorus loads are improving at 41 of 60 (68 percent) NTN stations analyzed. The median reduction in phosphorus load, for these 41 NTN stations, is 0.11 pounds per acre or 24.7 percent. Trends in suspended-sediment loads are improving at 29 of 59 (49 percent) NTN stations analyzed. The medina reduction in suspended-sediment load, for these 29 NTN stations, is 221 pounds per acre or 29.4 percent.

Doug Moyer
USGS
dlmoyer@usgs.gov
USGS Watershed Monitoring Results  Permanent Link

Science for Citizens
ian logo
Thu 25
Feb
http://ian.umces.edu/seminarseries/
USGS River Input Monitoring Results - Doug Moyer (USGS) - IAN Seminar Series
2016-02-25T12:00:00-05:00 2016-02-25T13:00:00-05:00
Macknis Room, Chesapeake Bay Program Office, 410 Severn Avenue (Suite 109), Annapolis MD

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), as a partner of the Chesapeake Bay Program, is responsible for determining the extent to which nitrogen, phosphorus, and suspended-sediment loads delivered to bay from the monitored-nontidal portions of the bay watershed. This is accomplished by analyzing water-quality observations from the nine River-Input Monitoring (RIM) stations to estimate nitrogen, phosphorus, and suspended-sediment annual loads and trends using Weighted Regressions on Time, Discharge, and Season (WRTDS). The resulting trends in nitrogen, phosphorus, and sediment loads are flow normalized to account for the year-to-year variation in river discharge; thus, the remaining trend is a result of changing sources, delays associated with storage or transport of historical inputs, and/or implemented reduction strategies.

Long-term (1985-2014) trends in nitrogen loads indicate improving conditions at the 7 of 9 RIM stations, including the five largest rivers. The Choptank River is the only station whose data indicate degrading conditions. Short-term (2005-2014) trends in total nitrogen loads indicate improving conditions at only 3 stations and degrading conditions at 4 stations. Results from the Susquehanna and James stations indicate no discernable short-term trends. Long-term trends in total phosphorus loads indicate improving conditions at 4 stations and degrading conditions at another 4 stations. Short-term trends in total phosphorus loads indicate improving conditions at only the Potomac and Patuxent stations, degrading conditions at 4 stations, and no discernable change in conditions at the 3 remaining stations.

Doug Moyer
USGS
dlmoyer@usgs.gov
USGS River Input Monitoring Results Permanent Link

Science for Citizens
ian logo


Time and Venue

Seminars start at 12 noon, scheduled for 45 mins (15 mins plus 30 min question/discussion time).

Science for Citizens seminars are held in the Joe Macknis Conference Room (Fish Shack) at the Chesapeake Bay Program Office, 410 Severn Avenue, Annapolis MD 21403, immediately following the monthly meetings of the Science Technical Analysis and Reporting (STAR) team meetings.

Citizens for Science seminars are conducted at the UMCES Annapolis Office, 1 Park Place, Suite 325, Annapolis, MD 21401.



Inquiries

If you have any queries or would like to contribute to next year's seminar series, please contact:

Jane Thomas ()
Bill Dennison ()