IAN Seminar Series 2014

The goal of the IAN seminar series is to provide concise, thought-provoking ideas relating to Chesapeake Bay science and management. Short presentations (15 minutes maximum length) are immediately followed by a lunchtime discussion of the topics raised by the presenter. The discussion is summarized and is posted along with a pdf version of the seminar slides. The seminars are captured on video and posted under a Creative Commons license so they can be freely shared.

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You are viewing 9 seminars from the database of 92 seminars. You can browse/search by year, and search terms to view other seminars.


DateSpeakerSeminarSeries
Mon 8
Dec
http://ian.umces.edu/seminarseries/
A view of stream habitat conditions in the Chesapeake Bay watershed through the eyes of brook trout. - Todd Petty () - IAN Seminar Series
2014-12-08T12:00:00-05:00 2014-12-08T13:00:00-05:00
Macknis Room, Chesapeake Bay Program Office, 410 Severn Avenue (Suite 109), Annapolis MD
A recent assessment of stream habitat conditions was used to construct a model f brook trout distributions throughout their native range in the Chesapeake Bay. Our approach uses very large datasets and machine learning statistics to quantify conditions at the stream segment level (64,000 stream segments) and accumulated conditions at the watershed scale. Through this assessment we are able to quantify current conditions, likely historic conditions in the absence of stress, and stream-to-stream level measures of stress associated with mining, agriculture, and urbanization. Model results are then integrated into a web-based GIS modeling tool that can be used for interactive visualization, conservation prioritization, and quantitative scenario analysis. When coupled with climate change predictions and large river species models, the brook trout will provide a powerful means for optimizing restoration actions that will produce measurable benefits to stream habitats and fish populations throughout the bay watershed.
Todd Petty

A view of stream habitat conditions in the Chesapeake Bay watershed through the eyes of brook trout. Permanent Link

Science for Citizens
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Mon 3
Nov
http://ian.umces.edu/seminarseries/
Choptank Complex Habitat Focus Area - Bruce Vogt () - IAN Seminar Series
2014-11-03T12:00:00-05:00 2014-11-03T13:00:00-05:00
Macknis Room, Chesapeake Bay Program Office, 410 Severn Avenue (Suite 109), Annapolis MD
The Delmarva/Choptank River Complex, which includes the Choptank and Little Choptank Rivers, is located on Maryland\'s Eastern Shore. This area is a treasured part of the Chesapeake Bay ecosystem, representing critical habitat for spawning striped bass and river herring, as well as historically abundant oyster reefs. Residents of the watershed, including many families who have lived there for multiple generations, have traditionally been employed in agriculture or commercial fishing. But time are changing in the region. Continued human population growth and land development threaten key habitats for fish and aquatic resources. The historical loss of wetlands in the upper Choptank River subwatershed is estimated to be 47,400 acres, approximately 11% of the total watershed area. Climate change and sea level rise, combined with land subsidence, further threaten losses of nearshore marshes and coastal environments. While the rivers and Bay have supported major annual seafood harvests in previous years, fishery resources are at risk. By designing the Choptank Complex as a Habitat Focus Area, NOAA will concentrate agency resources and leverage the many activities already under way in this watershed to improve and sustain ecological health.
Bruce Vogt

Choptank Complex Habitat Focus Area Permanent Link

Science for Citizens
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Wed 29
Oct
http://ian.umces.edu/seminarseries/
What climate changes means for Chesapeake Bay restoration - Raymond Najjar () - IAN Seminar Series
2014-10-29T12:00:00-04:00 2014-10-29T13:00:00-04:00
Macknis Room, Chesapeake Bay Program Office, 410 Severn Avenue (Suite 109), Annapolis MD
Dr. Raymond Najjar, from the Department of Meteorology at the Pennsylvania State University, presents research on climate change and how it will affect Bay restoration.
Raymond Najjar

What climate changes means for Chesapeake Bay restoration Permanent Link

Science for Citizens
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Tue 7
Oct
http://ian.umces.edu/seminarseries/
Open Standards for the Practice of Conservation and Miradi Software - Nick Salafsky (Conservation Measures Partnership) - IAN Seminar Series
2014-10-07T12:00:00-04:00 2014-10-07T13:00:00-04:00
Macknis Room, Chesapeake Bay Program Office, 410 Severn Avenue (Suite 109), Annapolis MD
This talk describes how the Open Standards for the Practice of Conservations provides a common framework for designing, managing, monitoring, and learning from conservation projects and programs that have been developed and adopted by some of the world\'s leading conservation organizations and agencies.
Nick Salafsky
Conservation Measures Partnership
Open Standards for the Practice of Conservation and Miradi Software Permanent Link

Science for Citizens
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Thu 22
May
http://ian.umces.edu/seminarseries/
Assessing the Ecosystem Services of Oyster Restoration - Dr. Howard Townsend (NOAA Chesapeake Bay Office) - IAN Seminar Series
2014-05-22T12:00:00-04:00 2014-05-22T13:00:00-04:00
Macknis Room, Chesapeake Bay Program Office, 410 Severn Avenue (Suite 109), Annapolis MD
Dr. Townsend discusses his team\'s efforts to develop models for the purpose of assessing the ecosystem services provided by oyster restoration.
Dr. Howard Townsend
NOAA Chesapeake Bay Office
Assessing the Ecosystem Services of Oyster Restoration Permanent Link

Science for Citizens
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Thu 22
May
http://ian.umces.edu/seminarseries/
Science Guiding Large-Scale Oyster Restoration - Stephanie Westby (NOAA Chesapeake Bay Office) - IAN Seminar Series
2014-05-22T12:00:00-04:00 2014-05-22T13:00:00-04:00
Macknis Room, Chesapeake Bay Program Office, 410 Severn Avenue (Suite 109), Annapolis MD
This talk will describe how benthic habitat characterization, oyster surveys, and public and scientific community input are being used to inform oyster restoration site selection, and how post-restoration monitoring is being implemented to track progress against the bay-wide oyster restoration success criteria established by the Chesapeake Oyster Metrics workgroup.
Stephanie Westby
NOAA Chesapeake Bay Office
Science Guiding Large-Scale Oyster Restoration Permanent Link

Science for Citizens
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Thu 24
Apr
http://ian.umces.edu/seminarseries/
A holistic coastal assessment and reporting framework balances economic, societal, and environmental interests - Dr. Heath Kelsey (IAN, UMCES) - IAN Seminar Series
2014-04-24T12:00:00-04:00 2014-04-24T13:00:00-04:00
Macknis Room, Chesapeake Bay Program Office, 410 Severn Avenue (Suite 109), Annapolis MD
The University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science has pioneered the use of ecosystem health report cards as synthetic tools to assess and communicate ecosystem health status. These ecosystem health report cards are evolving to include components that assess pressure, state, and response indicators, as well as indicators that are relevant to societal and economic sectors. UMCES\' work to date suggests that a new assessment and reporting framework can communicate the pressure, state, and management response from a multi-sectoral approach. In this presentation, Dr. Kelsey proposes an approach to customizing this framework, illustrated by current report card development projects for the Chesapeake Bay, the Great Barrier Reef, and the Mississippi River Basin.
Dr. Heath Kelsey
IAN, UMCES
hkelsey@umces.edu
A holistic coastal assessment and reporting framework balances economic, societal, and environmental interests Permanent Link

Science for Citizens
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Thu 27
Feb
http://ian.umces.edu/seminarseries/
Building and Sustaining Integrated Networks: BASIN - Dr. William Dennison (IAN, UMCES) - IAN Seminar Series
2014-02-27T12:00:00-05:00 2014-02-27T13:00:00-05:00
Macknis Room, Chesapeake Bay Program Office, 410 Severn Avenue (Suite 109), Annapolis MD
William Dennison provides a comparison of approaches used by a suite of water quality monitoring programs to operate and sustain their monitoring activities based on the first two panel discussions of the STAR BASINs review process.
Dr. William Dennison
IAN, UMCES
dennison@umces.edu
Building and Sustaining Integrated Networks: BASIN Permanent Link

Science for Citizens
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Thu 23
Jan
http://ian.umces.edu/seminarseries/
ABC is no longer as easy as 123. Advances in school report cards that are applicable to ecological health report cards. - Dr. Simon Costanzo (IAN) - IAN Seminar Series
2014-01-23T12:00:00-05:00 2014-01-23T13:00:00-05:00
Macknis Room, Chesapeake Bay Program Office, 410 Severn Avenue (Suite 109), Annapolis MD
In a world overflowing with information, report cards have remained central to tracking the progress of students\' academic abilities. Their ability to synthesize and communicate information quickly and easily to a wide range of people has seen their use expand outside the school domain. Ecological health report cards, for example, have become an important tool for integrating diverse physical, chemical, and biological data types into simple scores that can be communicated to decision-makers and the general public on a routine basis.  This presentation outlines recent advances in school report card design, function, and research and how these findings can be applied to improve the delivery, reception, and effectiveness of ecological health report cards as tools for environmental management.
Dr. Simon Costanzo
IAN
scostanzo@umces.edu
ABC is no longer as easy as 123. Advances in school report cards that are applicable to ecological health report cards. Permanent Link

Science for Citizens
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Time and Venue

Seminars start at 12 noon, scheduled for 45 mins (15 mins plus 30 min question/discussion time).

Science for Citizens seminars are held in the Joe Macknis Conference Room (Fish Shack) at the Chesapeake Bay Program Office, 410 Severn Avenue, Annapolis MD 21403, immediately following the monthly meetings of the Science Technical Analysis and Reporting (STAR) team meetings.

Citizens for Science seminars are conducted at the UMCES Annapolis Office, 1 Park Place, Suite 325, Annapolis, MD 21401.



Inquiries

If you have any queries or would like to contribute to next year's seminar series, please contact:

Jane Thomas ()
Bill Dennison ()