IAN Seminar Series 2015

The goal of the IAN seminar series is to provide concise, thought-provoking ideas relating to Chesapeake Bay science and management. Short presentations (15 minutes maximum length) are immediately followed by a lunchtime discussion of the topics raised by the presenter. The discussion is summarized and is posted along with a pdf version of the seminar slides. The seminars are captured on video and posted under a Creative Commons license so they can be freely shared.

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You are viewing 11 seminars from the database of 103 seminars. You can browse/search by year, and search terms to view other seminars.


DateSpeakerSeminarSeries
Thu 3
Dec
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Impacts of Shoreline Hardening and Watershed Land Use on Nearshore Habitats - Tom Jordan (SERC) - IAN Seminar Series
2015-12-03T12:00:00-05:00 2015-12-03T13:00:00-05:00
Macknis Room, Chesapeake Bay Program Office, 410 Severn Avenue (Suite 109), Annapolis MD

As part of a larger study of multiple stressors in near-shore habitats, we measured water quality in 50 mid-Atlantic coastal bays and sub-estuaries. Total nitrogen and total phosphorus concentrations in estuarine water increased with the percentage of cropland in the watershed. Total nitrogen concentration also increased with the percentage of developed land but not as steeply as with cropland. Chlorophyll a concentrations increased at similar rates with increase in either developed or urban land. The land use composition of the local watershed clearly affected water quality in the bays and sub-estuaries, indicating that local efforts to reduce nutrient pollution will be needed to improve water quality. In 11 sub-estuaries we also analyzed mercury and organic contaminants in fish tissues. Some organic pollutants in fish, such as PCBs and pesticides, increased with developed land in the local watershed, depending on fish species, while some agricultural pesticides were associated with cropland. In contrast, mercury in fish decreased with developed land and increased with the percentage of marsh shoreline, suggesting an atmospheric source for mercury and enhanced mercury methylation in marshes.

Tom Jordan
SERC
jordanth@si.edu
Impacts of Shoreline Hardening and Watershed Land Use on Nearshore Habitats Permanent Link

Science for Citizens
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Thu 3
Dec
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Interacting Effects of Land Use and Shoreline Armoring on Submerged Aquatic Vegetation (SAV) - Don Weller (SERC) - IAN Seminar Series
2015-12-03T12:00:00-05:00 2015-12-03T13:00:00-05:00
Macknis Room, Chesapeake Bay Program Office, 410 Severn Avenue (Suite 109), Annapolis MD

We used two approaches to study the interactive effects of land use and shoreline armoring on submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) in Chesapeake Bay. One approach developed spatial-statistical models relating SAV abundance to land use and shoreline armoring. The models exploited bay-wide data on land cover, shoreline hardening, and decades of annual SAV mapping. The second approach was a field study of SAV abundance along transects extending offshore from natural and riprapped shorelines. Both approaches show that human land uses, especially cropland and developed land, and shoreline armoring can have negative impacts on SAV. However, the effects differ among salinity zones, probably because the dominant SAV species and associated stressor-response relationships also differ with salinity.

• Local watershed land use affects subestuary SAV abundance, which is lower subestuaries with in watersheds dominated by agriculture or developed land.

• Shoreline hardening can reduce SAV abundance. The effects differ among salinity zones and are strongest in the polyhaline. Bulkhead has stronger effects than riprap

• Shoreline hardening has more impact on SAV in subestuaries with healthy watersheds. Shoreline effects are weaker where development or agriculture already limit SAV.

• Natural shorelines are not all equal. Forested shorelines are positively related to adjacent

SAV abundance, but shoreline marsh has a negative effect, possibly by promoting peat or mud.

• Stressor impacts differ among SAV species and salinity zones, and different SAV communities may need different management strategies!

Don Weller
SERC
wellerd@si.edu
Interacting Effects of Land Use and Shoreline Armoring on Submerged Aquatic Vegetation (SAV) Permanent Link

Science for Citizens
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Thu 3
Dec
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Fish, Crabs and Habitat: Exploring the Land-water Interface - Denise Breitburg (SERC) - IAN Seminar Series
2015-12-03T12:00:00-05:00 2015-12-03T13:00:00-05:00
Macknis Room, Chesapeake Bay Program Office, 410 Severn Avenue (Suite 109), Annapolis MD
Details explaining a study done on the effects of land use and shoreline hardening on fish and crabs.
Denise Breitburg
SERC
breitburgd@si.edu
Fish, Crabs and Habitat: Exploring the Land-water Interface Permanent Link

Science for Citizens
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Thu 3
Dec
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Phragmites australis – Common Reed

- Melissa K. McCormick (SERC) - IAN Seminar Series
2015-12-03T12:00:00-05:00 2015-12-03T13:00:00-05:00
Macknis Room, Chesapeake Bay Program Office, 410 Severn Avenue (Suite 109), Annapolis MD

An introduced form of Phragmites australis, Common Reed, has exploded in abundance in wetlands of the Chesapeake Bay since the 1980s. Phragmites quickly turns diverse native wetlands into monocultures that provide poorer habitat for native fauna. We combined analysis of patterns of genetic variation in existing reed stands that established in association with a range of anthropogenic stressors with an experimental reed removal study to understand how other stressors affect Phragmites spread and how landscape factors may affect the success of management. We found that most Phragmites seeds establish within 100m of their source, while few disperse farther than 500m, indicating a scale for successful management. Dispersing seeds are more likely to establish near bulkheads and riprap than on unhardened shorelines. Because of the possibility of re-establishment of Phragmites in areas with nearby seed sources, management may be most successful when carried out at the whole subestuary scale and in subestuaries with few stands of non-native Phragmites. In eight sites where we attempted us remove Phragmites, six years has not been enough for native communities to re-establish, despite native seed banks present at each site. The sites with the greatest recovery have been those that are growing on solid substrate that retains integrity after reed has been removed. We are working to raise awareness of this significant invader and to develop management tools that can guide landowners and managers in developing guidelines for effective Phragmites management.

Melissa K. McCormick
SERC
mccormickm@si.edu

Phragmites australis – Common Reed

Permanent Link

Science for Citizens
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Thu 22
Oct
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Chesapeake Bay Sentinel Site Cooperative - Sarah Wilkins (MDSG Extension) - IAN Seminar Series
2015-10-22T12:00:00-04:00 2015-10-22T13:00:00-04:00
Macknis Room, Chesapeake Bay Program Office, 410 Severn Avenue (Suite 109), Annapolis MD
The Chesapeake Bay Sentinel Site Cooperative (CBSSC) is a partnership among local, state and federal agencies as well as academic institutions, non-profit organizations, local communities and regional organizations. The Cooperative brings together experts from scientific, resource management, and environmental stewardship organizations to inform local management decisions relating to coastal flooding and sea level rise. The CBSSC is made up of six core ecological Sentinel Sites each collecting long-term data including marsh elevation, water levels, water quality, and vegetation type and distribution. The Cooperative also connects to and relies on broader observing networks such as the National Water Level Observation Network, or NWLON, and the Virginia Estuarine and Coastal Observing System (VECOS). The CBSSC strives to better coordinate existing resources among partners while reducing redundancy and increasing effectiveness in understanding sea level rise and coastal flooding. A cooperative, by definition, is jointly owned and run by its members, who share in the mutual benefits generated from collaborative work. By using this collaborative model, the hope is to bring both traditional and non-traditional partners together around the common issue of flooding and sea level rise to better understand and mitigate the impacts to both the natural environment and coastal communities.
Sarah Wilkins
MDSG Extension
sarah.wilkins@maryland.gov
Chesapeake Bay Sentinel Site Cooperative Permanent Link

Science for Citizens
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Thu 24
Sep
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UMCES Chesapeake Bay Report Card – the 2014 Results - Caroline Donovan (UMCES IAN) - IAN Seminar Series
2015-09-24T12:00:00-04:00 2015-09-24T13:00:00-04:00
Macknis Room, Chesapeake Bay Program Office, 410 Severn Avenue (Suite 109), Annapolis MD
The overall health of Chesapeake Bay improved in 2014, with significantly improving trends in both total nitrogen and total phosphorus in the Bay. Overall, the tidal waters of the Chesapeake scored a C (50%), which was up from the previous year’s score of 45% (also a C). The 2014 overall score of 50%, a C, is considered moderate health. The improvement in the overall score is due to improved nutrient scores (lower amounts of nutrients in the water column) and improved aquatic grasses scores. While not part of the overall grade, fisheries indicators and a climate change resilience index were also part of the 2014 Chesapeake Bay report card. Methods and results of these indicators, as well as the new report card website, will be reviewed during this presentation.  
Caroline Donovan
UMCES IAN
cdonovan@ca.umces.edu
UMCES Chesapeake Bay Report Card – the 2014 Results Permanent Link

Science for Citizens
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Thu 20
Aug
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STAR Seminar: Citizen Science Success Stories from Virginia - Anna Mathis (Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay ) - IAN Seminar Series
2015-08-20T12:00:00-04:00 2015-08-20T13:00:00-04:00
Macknis Room, Chesapeake Bay Program Office, 410 Severn Avenue (Suite 109), Annapolis MD

As the Chesapeake Bay Program begins a multi-year effort to increase data available for tracking Bay restoration progress by incorporating citizen science into the CBP monitoring network, this presentation highlights Virginia’s example of a similar effort on a state level. In 2003, Virginia Department of Environmental Quality developed a quality assurance program that uses a tiered approach to allow the agency to use non-agency data to assess water quality while meeting both agency and volunteer group needs. The presentation also includes an introduction to two successful statewide volunteer monitoring programs in Virginia: the River Trends program of the Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay and the Virginia Save Our Streams program of the Izaak Walton League of America.

Anna Mathis
Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay
amathis@allianceforthebay.org

Leah Miller (Izaak Walton League of America)
leah@iwla.org
STAR Seminar: Citizen Science Success Stories from Virginia Permanent Link

Science for Citizens
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Thu 30
Apr
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Land Change Forecasts and Vulnerability Assessments - Peter Claggett (USGSEGSC) - IAN Seminar Series
2015-04-30T12:00:00-04:00 2015-04-30T13:00:00-04:00
Macknis Room, Chesapeake Bay Program Office, 410 Severn Avenue (Suite 109), Annapolis MD
Peter Claggett
USGSEGSC
pclagget@chesapeakebay.net
Land Change Forecasts and Vulnerability Assessments Permanent Link

Science for Citizens
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Thu 26
Mar
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An Overview of Citizen Science and Crowdsourcing in Federal Agencies - Anne Bowser (STIP) - IAN Seminar Series
2015-03-26T12:00:00-04:00 2015-03-26T13:00:00-04:00
Macknis Room, Chesapeake Bay Program Office, 410 Severn Avenue (Suite 109), Annapolis MD
Anne presents an overview of citizen science and crowdsourcing in federal agencies. The Commons Lab Inventory, led by the Anne, is a collection of federally supported citizen science and crowdsourcing projects. She also presents her work on STIP\'s Serious Games, in which she supports the activities to the Federal Gaming Guild (FGG), and how she is writing a report on serious games for publication this summer.
Anne Bowser
STIP
anne.bowser@wilsoncenter.org
An Overview of Citizen Science and Crowdsourcing in Federal Agencies Permanent Link

Science for Citizens
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Thu 26
Feb
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Using Chesapeake Bay Program Decision Support Tools for Developing Locals TMDLs and Implementation Plans. - Olivia Devereux () - IAN Seminar Series
2015-02-26T12:00:00-05:00 2015-02-26T13:00:00-05:00
Macknis Room, Chesapeake Bay Program Office, 410 Severn Avenue (Suite 109), Annapolis MD

Olivia will show how the Chesapeake Bay Program\'s decision support tools are used to develop local TMDLs and TMDL implementation plans. These decision support tools include CAST and BayFAST and the state-specific tools of MAST (Maryland) and VAST (Virginia). She will show examples of how the tools may be used to demonstrate the ability to comply with permit requirements related to nitrogen, phosphorus, and sediment loads as well as demonstrate costs associated with plans. 

Olivia Devereux

olivia@devereuxconsulting.com
Using Chesapeake Bay Program Decision Support Tools for Developing Locals TMDLs and Implementation Plans. Permanent Link

Science for Citizens
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Thu 22
Jan
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Global, National, & Local Trends of Nitrogen Use Efficiency in Agriculture. - Eric Davidson (UMCES) - IAN Seminar Series
2015-01-22T12:00:00-05:00 2015-01-22T13:00:00-05:00
Macknis Room, Chesapeake Bay Program Office, 410 Severn Avenue (Suite 109), Annapolis MD
More than half of the people in the world are nourished by crops grown with synthetic nitrogen (N) fertilizers.  However, more than a billion people are still undernourished, and global population will increase by 2-3 billion by 2050, which means that demand for N fertilizers is likely to grow.  Unfortunately, unintended adverse environmental and human health consequences of reactive N escaping agricultural fields are occurring as groundwater contamination, eutrophication of freshwater and estuarine ecosystems, atmospheric pollutants related to nitrogen oxides and ammonia gas emissions, and accumulation of the potent greenhouse gas and stratospheric ozone depleting substance, nitrous oxide.   An alternative to increasing fertilizer-N use proportionately to the increase in food demand is to improve nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) in agriculture.  I will present preliminary results from an analysis of trends in NUE from 1961 to 2011 for 129 countries, demonstrating the importance of both crop mix and policy.  In the USA, NUE is gradually increasing while harvest yield also increases, although considerable room for improvement remains, such as better coordination among conservation and retail communities.  Retailers and crop advisors are usually farmers’ most trusted sources of information, so their engagement is crucial for NUE improvement efforts.  An example of a partial success story in Nebraska illustrates the importance of tailoring regulatory and outreach approaches to local conditions, administered by local units.  A relatively simple benchmarking system for tracking NUE progress is proposed.
Eric Davidson
UMCES
edavidson@umces.edu
Global, National, & Local Trends of Nitrogen Use Efficiency in Agriculture. Permanent Link

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Time and Venue

Seminars start at 12 noon, scheduled for 45 mins (15 mins plus 30 min question/discussion time).

Science for Citizens seminars are held in the Joe Macknis Conference Room (Fish Shack) at the Chesapeake Bay Program Office, 410 Severn Avenue, Annapolis MD 21403, immediately following the monthly meetings of the Science Technical Analysis and Reporting (STAR) team meetings.

Citizens for Science seminars are conducted at the UMCES Annapolis Office, 1 Park Place, Suite 325, Annapolis, MD 21401.



Inquiries

If you have any queries or would like to contribute to next year's seminar series, please contact:

Jane Thomas ()
Bill Dennison ()