IAN Seminar Series 2017

The goal of the IAN seminar series is to provide concise, thought-provoking ideas relating to Chesapeake Bay science and management. Short presentations (15 minutes maximum length) are immediately followed by a lunchtime discussion of the topics raised by the presenter. The discussion is summarized and is posted along with a pdf version of the seminar slides. The seminars are captured on video and posted under a Creative Commons license so they can be freely shared.

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DateSpeakerSeminarSeries
Thu 26
May
2016
http://ian.umces.edu/seminarseries/
SAV Monitoring Program - Sustainability and funding challenges - Brooke Landry (CBP SAV Workgroup) - IAN Seminar Series
2016-05-26T12:00:00-04:00 2016-05-26T13:00:00-04:00
Macknis Room, Chesapeake Bay Program Office, 410 Severn Avenue (Suite 109), Annapolis MD

Since the early 1980s, the Virginia Institute of Marine Science, with the support of the Chesapeake Bay Program partnership, and with funding from the EPA and other local, state, and federal partners, has lead an annual Bay-wide SAV monitoring effort using data interpreted from aerial imagery integrated with ground survey data. The program has evolved over the past three decades to become the most successful large-scale, consistent, long-term SAV monitoring program in the world. Because of the program’s endurance and reliability of data, SAV scientists and managers in the Chesapeake Bay watershed have grown to rely on the data for a variety of purposes. With that said, the ability to identify and secure diverse and sustainable sources of long-term funding for the program have not been successful in the past several years. The program itself has become more expensive over the years as the quantity of data and level of detail, accuracy, and staff expertise have increased, while simultaneously the number and diversity of funding partners has declined significantly over the life of the survey, with increased EPA funds making up the difference over the past decade. VIMS recently and successfully re-competed for the SAV aerial survey grant from the EPA and therefore has EPA funding for the next six years. They are, however, still short on funding from additional partners (it\'s set up as a cooperative agreement). The program is approximately $100,000 per year deficient in funds and under threat of ending if additional financial partners aren\'t secured.

Brooke Landry
CBP SAV Workgroup
brooke.landry@maryland.gov
SAV Monitoring Program - Sustainability and funding challenges

Science for Citizens
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Abstract

Since the early 1980s, the Virginia Institute of Marine Science, with the support of the Chesapeake Bay Program partnership, and with funding from the EPA and other local, state, and federal partners, has lead an annual Bay-wide SAV monitoring effort using data interpreted from aerial imagery integrated with ground survey data. The program has evolved over the past three decades to become the most successful large-scale, consistent, long-term SAV monitoring program in the world. Because of the program’s endurance and reliability of data, SAV scientists and managers in the Chesapeake Bay watershed have grown to rely on the data for a variety of purposes. With that said, the ability to identify and secure diverse and sustainable sources of long-term funding for the program have not been successful in the past several years. The program itself has become more expensive over the years as the quantity of data and level of detail, accuracy, and staff expertise have increased, while simultaneously the number and diversity of funding partners has declined significantly over the life of the survey, with increased EPA funds making up the difference over the past decade. VIMS recently and successfully re-competed for the SAV aerial survey grant from the EPA and therefore has EPA funding for the next six years. They are, however, still short on funding from additional partners (it's set up as a cooperative agreement). The program is approximately $100,000 per year deficient in funds and under threat of ending if additional financial partners aren't secured.



Time and Venue

Seminars start at 12 noon, scheduled for 45 mins (15 mins plus 30 min question/discussion time).

Science for Citizens seminars are held in the Joe Macknis Conference Room (Fish Shack) at the Chesapeake Bay Program Office, 410 Severn Avenue, Annapolis MD 21403, immediately following the monthly meetings of the Science Technical Analysis and Reporting (STAR) team meetings.

Citizens for Science seminars are conducted at the UMCES Annapolis Office, 1 Park Place, Suite 325, Annapolis, MD 21401.



Inquiries

If you have any queries or would like to contribute to next year's seminar series, please contact:

Jane Thomas ()
Bill Dennison ()