IAN Seminar Series 2016

The goal of the IAN seminar series is to provide concise, thought-provoking ideas relating to Chesapeake Bay science and management. Short presentations (15 minutes maximum length) are immediately followed by a lunchtime discussion of the topics raised by the presenter. The discussion is summarized and is posted along with a pdf version of the seminar slides. The seminars are captured on video and posted under a Creative Commons license so they can be freely shared.

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DateSpeakerSeminarSeries
Thu 26
May
2016
http://ian.umces.edu/seminarseries/
Submerged Aquatic Vegetation (SAV) Update - The Future of Annual Baywide Monitoring - Robert J. Orth (VIMS) - IAN Seminar Series
2016-05-26T12:00:00-04:00 2016-05-26T13:00:00-04:00
Macknis Room, Chesapeake Bay Program Office, 410 Severn Avenue (Suite 109), Annapolis MD

Chesapeake Bay support a diverse assemblage of 10-15 species of submersed aquatic vegetation (SAV) whose distributions are generally constrained by salinity. Two species are found in the higher salinity areas with the remaining species found in the lower salinity and freshwater areas of the region. Because of their sensitivity to water quality changes, SAV are being used by resource managers as a sentinel group to reflect management efforts to improve water quality in this region.

An annual aerial SAV monitoring program has been conducted throughout the Chesapeake Bay and the Delmarva Coastal Bays on an annual basis from 1984 through 2015, except for 1988. Black and white photography was acquired at a scale of 1:24,000, following acquisition timing guidelines that optimize visibility of SAV beds with digital imagery used in 2015. Approximately 170 flight lines were flown each year between May and October, yielding over 2,000 photographs or digital images.

Since the 1984, SAV has exhibited long-term (decadal) increases and decreases, as well as some large, single-year changes. Current SAV coverage for almost all segments in the Chesapeake Bay remain below established restoration targets based on historical coverages for each region, indicating that SAV abundance and associated ecosystem services are currently limited by continued poor water quality, and more recently high summertime temperatures for species in the higher saline regions which also has the potential to alter the species distribution in this region. Results are used often in regulatory matters in the Bay, e.g. aquaculture permits,dredging, dock construction. The utility of the survey results are most important in the state regulatory hierarchy as the results are used to assess improving water quality conditions in the Bay.

Robert J. Orth
VIMS
jjorth@vims.edu
Submerged Aquatic Vegetation (SAV) Update - The Future of Annual Baywide Monitoring

Science for Citizens
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Abstract

Chesapeake Bay support a diverse assemblage of 10-15 species of submersed aquatic vegetation (SAV) whose distributions are generally constrained by salinity. Two species are found in the higher salinity areas with the remaining species found in the lower salinity and freshwater areas of the region. Because of their sensitivity to water quality changes, SAV are being used by resource managers as a sentinel group to reflect management efforts to improve water quality in this region.

An annual aerial SAV monitoring program has been conducted throughout the Chesapeake Bay and the Delmarva Coastal Bays on an annual basis from 1984 through 2015, except for 1988. Black and white photography was acquired at a scale of 1:24,000, following acquisition timing guidelines that optimize visibility of SAV beds with digital imagery used in 2015. Approximately 170 flight lines were flown each year between May and October, yielding over 2,000 photographs or digital images.

Since the 1984, SAV has exhibited long-term (decadal) increases and decreases, as well as some large, single-year changes. Current SAV coverage for almost all segments in the Chesapeake Bay remain below established restoration targets based on historical coverages for each region, indicating that SAV abundance and associated ecosystem services are currently limited by continued poor water quality, and more recently high summertime temperatures for species in the higher saline regions which also has the potential to alter the species distribution in this region. Results are used often in regulatory matters in the Bay, e.g. aquaculture permits,dredging, dock construction. The utility of the survey results are most important in the state regulatory hierarchy as the results are used to assess improving water quality conditions in the Bay.



Time and Venue

Seminars start at 12 noon, scheduled for 45 mins (15 mins plus 30 min question/discussion time).

Science for Citizens seminars are held in the Joe Macknis Conference Room (Fish Shack) at the Chesapeake Bay Program Office, 410 Severn Avenue, Annapolis MD 21403, immediately following the monthly meetings of the Science Technical Analysis and Reporting (STAR) team meetings.

Citizens for Science seminars are conducted at the UMCES Annapolis Office, 1 Park Place, Suite 325, Annapolis, MD 21401.



Inquiries

If you have any queries or would like to contribute to next year's seminar series, please contact:

Jane Thomas ()
Bill Dennison ()