IAN Seminar Series 2016

The goal of the IAN seminar series is to provide concise, thought-provoking ideas relating to Chesapeake Bay science and management. Short presentations (15 minutes maximum length) are immediately followed by a lunchtime discussion of the topics raised by the presenter. The discussion is summarized and is posted along with a pdf version of the seminar slides. The seminars are captured on video and posted under a Creative Commons license so they can be freely shared.

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DateSpeakerSeminarSeries
Thu 26
May
2016
http://ian.umces.edu/seminarseries/
Modeling the Impacts of Water Quality on SAV in the Tidal Chesapeake Bay - Richard Zimmerman (ODU) - IAN Seminar Series
2016-05-26T12:00:00-04:00 2016-05-26T13:00:00-04:00
Macknis Room, Chesapeake Bay Program Office, 410 Severn Avenue (Suite 109), Annapolis MD

Although environmental requirements of submerged aquatic vegetation have been studied for years, reliable metrics for predicting their response to current or future conditions remain elusive. The combined effects of temperature, CO 2 , and light availability controlled by water quality and epiphytes were explored using GrassLight, a bio-optical model that provided a predictive environment for evaluating the interaction of multiple stressors on SAV distribution and density across the submarine landscape of the Chesapeake Bay. Model predictions were validated against in situ measures of spectral diffuse attenuation, SAV density and distribution. The potential for photosynthesis stimulated by ocean acidification to mitigate the effects of high summer temperature, water quality and epiphyte load on SAV populations growing near the southern limit of their distribution were explored. The model accurately reproduced the submarine light environment from measured water quality parameters, and predicted their impacts on SAV distributions throughout the Bay. It also reproduced the negative effects of warm summer temperatures on eelgrass (Zostera marina L.) distribution in the southern Bay, and demonstrated that CO 2 increases projected for the next century should stimulate photosynthesis sufficiently to offset the negative effects of thermal stress, even in the presence of epiphytes. Thus, improved water quality should facilitate the survival of SAV populations in Chesapeake region, even in the face of a warming climate.

Richard Zimmerman
ODU
rzimmerm@odu.edu
Modeling the Impacts of Water Quality on SAV in the Tidal Chesapeake Bay

Science for Citizens
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Abstract

Although environmental requirements of submerged aquatic vegetation have been studied for years, reliable metrics for predicting their response to current or future conditions remain elusive. The combined effects of temperature, CO 2 , and light availability controlled by water quality and epiphytes were explored using GrassLight, a bio-optical model that provided a predictive environment for evaluating the interaction of multiple stressors on SAV distribution and density across the submarine landscape of the Chesapeake Bay. Model predictions were validated against in situ measures of spectral diffuse attenuation, SAV density and distribution. The potential for photosynthesis stimulated by ocean acidification to mitigate the effects of high summer temperature, water quality and epiphyte load on SAV populations growing near the southern limit of their distribution were explored. The model accurately reproduced the submarine light environment from measured water quality parameters, and predicted their impacts on SAV distributions throughout the Bay. It also reproduced the negative effects of warm summer temperatures on eelgrass (Zostera marina L.) distribution in the southern Bay, and demonstrated that CO 2 increases projected for the next century should stimulate photosynthesis sufficiently to offset the negative effects of thermal stress, even in the presence of epiphytes. Thus, improved water quality should facilitate the survival of SAV populations in Chesapeake region, even in the face of a warming climate.



Time and Venue

Seminars start at 12 noon, scheduled for 45 mins (15 mins plus 30 min question/discussion time).

Science for Citizens seminars are held in the Joe Macknis Conference Room (Fish Shack) at the Chesapeake Bay Program Office, 410 Severn Avenue, Annapolis MD 21403, immediately following the monthly meetings of the Science Technical Analysis and Reporting (STAR) team meetings.

Citizens for Science seminars are conducted at the UMCES Annapolis Office, 1 Park Place, Suite 325, Annapolis, MD 21401.



Inquiries

If you have any queries or would like to contribute to next year's seminar series, please contact:

Jane Thomas ()
Bill Dennison ()