IAN Seminar Series 2014

The goal of the IAN seminar series is to provide concise, thought-provoking ideas relating to Chesapeake Bay science and management. Short presentations (15 minutes maximum length) are immediately followed by a lunchtime discussion of the topics raised by the presenter. The discussion is summarized and is posted along with a pdf version of the seminar slides. The seminars are captured on video and posted under a Creative Commons license so they can be freely shared.

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DateSpeakerSeminarSeries
Mon 17
Sep
2007
http://ian.umces.edu/seminarseries/
Aquatic Toxicity Research: the Bay and Beyond - Carys Mitchelmore (CBL UMCES) - IAN Seminar Series
2007-09-17T12:00:00-04:00 2007-09-17T13:00:00-04:00
Macknis Room, Chesapeake Bay Program Office, 410 Severn Avenue (Suite 109), Annapolis MD
Research in our laboratory encompasses both mechanistic and applied issues regarding the fate and effects of a range of chemical and biological stressors (pollutants) in the aquatic environment, from the Chesapeake Bay to tropical coral reefs. This seminar will focus on the projects pertinent to the Chesapeake Bay but also highlights some of the research that is being carried out on coral reef toxicology. To preempt this talk I would like to emphasize the words of one of the first well-known toxicologists; \'ALL substances are poisons, there is none which is not a poison, the right dose differentiates a poison from a remedy\', Paraceleus (16th century). So although the concentration and the duration of exposure to a pollutant in the Bay is important, we must also consider how (if at all) pollutant(s) can be taken up by organism\'s, it\'s fate and ultimate effect. Further complicating these issues is the myriad of multiple pollutants currently in the Bay and confounding effects of other chemical, biological and physical stressors. This seminar will address issues of metabolism and effects of organic contaminants, with an emphasis on oxidative stress, genotoxicity and thyroid hormone disruption. Targeted pollutants include, flame retardants (BDEs), crude oil and chemical dispersants, proposed ballast water treatment biocides and human bacterial pathogens. Organisms under study include, various estuarine/freshwater fish and invertebrates, native versus non-native oysters and tropical coral and anemone species.
Carys Mitchelmore
CBL UMCES
mitchelmore@umces.edu
Aquatic Toxicity Research: the Bay and Beyond

Science for Citizens
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Abstract

Research in our laboratory encompasses both mechanistic and applied issues regarding the fate and effects of a range of chemical and biological stressors (pollutants) in the aquatic environment, from the Chesapeake Bay to tropical coral reefs. This seminar will focus on the projects pertinent to the Chesapeake Bay but also highlights some of the research that is being carried out on coral reef toxicology. To preempt this talk I would like to emphasize the words of one of the first well-known toxicologists; 'ALL substances are poisons, there is none which is not a poison, the right dose differentiates a poison from a remedy', Paraceleus (16th century). So although the concentration and the duration of exposure to a pollutant in the Bay is important, we must also consider how (if at all) pollutant(s) can be taken up by organism's, it's fate and ultimate effect. Further complicating these issues is the myriad of multiple pollutants currently in the Bay and confounding effects of other chemical, biological and physical stressors. This seminar will address issues of metabolism and effects of organic contaminants, with an emphasis on oxidative stress, genotoxicity and thyroid hormone disruption. Targeted pollutants include, flame retardants (BDEs), crude oil and chemical dispersants, proposed ballast water treatment biocides and human bacterial pathogens. Organisms under study include, various estuarine/freshwater fish and invertebrates, native versus non-native oysters and tropical coral and anemone species.



Time and Venue

Seminars start at 12 noon, scheduled for 45 mins (15 mins plus 30 min question/discussion time).

Science for Citizens seminars are held in the Joe Macknis Conference Room (Fish Shack) at the Chesapeake Bay Program Office, 410 Severn Avenue, Annapolis MD 21403, immediately following the monthly meetings of the Science Technical Analysis and Reporting (STAR) team meetings.

Citizens for Science seminars are conducted at the UMCES Annapolis Office, 1 Park Place, Suite 325, Annapolis, MD 21401.



Inquiries

If you have any queries or would like to contribute to next year's seminar series, please contact:

Jane Thomas ()
Bill Dennison ()