IAN Seminar Series 2014

The goal of the IAN seminar series is to provide concise, thought-provoking ideas relating to Chesapeake Bay science and management. Short presentations (15 minutes maximum length) are immediately followed by a lunchtime discussion of the topics raised by the presenter. The discussion is summarized and is posted along with a pdf version of the seminar slides. The seminars are captured on video and posted under a Creative Commons license so they can be freely shared.

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DateSpeakerSeminarSeries
Thu 27
Mar
2008
http://ian.umces.edu/seminarseries/
Bacterial biogeography in aquatic ecosystems - Byron Crump (HPL UMCES) - IAN Seminar Series
2008-03-27T12:00:00-04:00 2008-03-27T13:00:00-04:00
Macknis Room, Chesapeake Bay Program Office, 410 Severn Avenue (Suite 109), Annapolis MD
Bacterioplankton are essential components of aquatic ecosystems, catalyzing critical biogeochemical reactions and serving as central members of planktonic food webs. Recent large-scale DNA sequencing projects show a staggeringly high genetic diversity in bacterioplankton communities, and yet several recent studies show predictable patterns in this diversity including spatial patterns related to environmental gradients and dispersal, and temporal patterns including seasonality and annual re-assembly. These biogeographic patterns reveal the tight connection between bacteria and their environment, and suggest that Metacommunity Theory and other ecological theories developed for macroscopic organisms may also apply to microscopic organisms. This talk will discuss these theories citing several examples of biogeographic patterns in bacterioplankton drawn from research on the Alaskan Tundra, a New England salt marsh estuary, and the anoxic zone of the Chesapeake Bay.
Byron Crump
HPL UMCES
bcrump@umces.edu
Bacterial biogeography in aquatic ecosystems

Science for Citizens
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Abstract

Bacterioplankton are essential components of aquatic ecosystems, catalyzing critical biogeochemical reactions and serving as central members of planktonic food webs. Recent large-scale DNA sequencing projects show a staggeringly high genetic diversity in bacterioplankton communities, and yet several recent studies show predictable patterns in this diversity including spatial patterns related to environmental gradients and dispersal, and temporal patterns including seasonality and annual re-assembly. These biogeographic patterns reveal the tight connection between bacteria and their environment, and suggest that Metacommunity Theory and other ecological theories developed for macroscopic organisms may also apply to microscopic organisms. This talk will discuss these theories citing several examples of biogeographic patterns in bacterioplankton drawn from research on the Alaskan Tundra, a New England salt marsh estuary, and the anoxic zone of the Chesapeake Bay.



Time and Venue

Seminars start at 12 noon, scheduled for 45 mins (15 mins plus 30 min question/discussion time).

Science for Citizens seminars are held in the Joe Macknis Conference Room (Fish Shack) at the Chesapeake Bay Program Office, 410 Severn Avenue, Annapolis MD 21403, immediately following the monthly meetings of the Science Technical Analysis and Reporting (STAR) team meetings.

Citizens for Science seminars are conducted at the UMCES Annapolis Office, 1 Park Place, Suite 325, Annapolis, MD 21401.



Inquiries

If you have any queries or would like to contribute to next year's seminar series, please contact:

Jane Thomas ()
Bill Dennison ()