IAN Seminar Series 2014

The goal of the IAN seminar series is to provide concise, thought-provoking ideas relating to Chesapeake Bay science and management. Short presentations (15 minutes maximum length) are immediately followed by a lunchtime discussion of the topics raised by the presenter. The discussion is summarized and is posted along with a pdf version of the seminar slides. The seminars are captured on video and posted under a Creative Commons license so they can be freely shared.

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DateSpeakerSeminarSeries
Thu 19
Feb
2009
http://ian.umces.edu/seminarseries/
Biological response to ecosystem change in the northern Bering and Chukchi Seas - Jacqueline Grebmeier (UMCES CBL) - IAN Seminar Series
2009-02-19T12:00:00-05:00 2009-02-19T13:00:00-05:00
Macknis Room, Chesapeake Bay Program Office, 410 Severn Avenue (Suite 109), Annapolis MD
The continental shelf and slope regions in the Pacific Arctic sector are extremely productive due to the input of nutrient-rich Pacific water on the northern Bering and Chukchi Sea shelves and into the Arctic Ocean. Benthic-dominated regions on these shallow shelves have high benthic infaunal biomass and sediment carbon cycling. Bivalves, polychaetes and amphipods dominate the infaunal organisms and this region serves as a major prey area for benthic-feeding marine mammals and seabirds, including walrus, gray whales and diving seaducks. Past studies in the region indicate food supply is the major factor influencing benthic carbon cycling, with colder water regions having some of the highest benthic carbon cycling rates, indicative of higher organic carbon export to the benthos. However, with the increasing influence of warmer, lower nutrient water transiting northward from the Bering Sea, a continued reduced seasonal sea ice coverage, and corresponding increases in seawater temperatures, it is likely that the changes being seen in the biological ecosystem will continue and possibly accelerate. A large-scale impact might well be a transitional change from a benthic-dominated northern Bering and Chukchi shelf region to a more pelagic-dominated system. Data will be presented on key biological factors influencing benthic carbon cycling at various time and space scales in the western Arctic region in order to evaluate both present impacts and possible future changes in benthic processes in this highly productive system.
Jacqueline Grebmeier
UMCES CBL
jgrebmei@umces.edu
Biological response to ecosystem change in the northern Bering and Chukchi Seas

Science for Citizens
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Abstract

The continental shelf and slope regions in the Pacific Arctic sector are extremely productive due to the input of nutrient-rich Pacific water on the northern Bering and Chukchi Sea shelves and into the Arctic Ocean. Benthic-dominated regions on these shallow shelves have high benthic infaunal biomass and sediment carbon cycling. Bivalves, polychaetes and amphipods dominate the infaunal organisms and this region serves as a major prey area for benthic-feeding marine mammals and seabirds, including walrus, gray whales and diving seaducks. Past studies in the region indicate food supply is the major factor influencing benthic carbon cycling, with colder water regions having some of the highest benthic carbon cycling rates, indicative of higher organic carbon export to the benthos. However, with the increasing influence of warmer, lower nutrient water transiting northward from the Bering Sea, a continued reduced seasonal sea ice coverage, and corresponding increases in seawater temperatures, it is likely that the changes being seen in the biological ecosystem will continue and possibly accelerate. A large-scale impact might well be a transitional change from a benthic-dominated northern Bering and Chukchi shelf region to a more pelagic-dominated system. Data will be presented on key biological factors influencing benthic carbon cycling at various time and space scales in the western Arctic region in order to evaluate both present impacts and possible future changes in benthic processes in this highly productive system.



Time and Venue

Seminars start at 12 noon, scheduled for 45 mins (15 mins plus 30 min question/discussion time).

Science for Citizens seminars are held in the Joe Macknis Conference Room (Fish Shack) at the Chesapeake Bay Program Office, 410 Severn Avenue, Annapolis MD 21403, immediately following the monthly meetings of the Science Technical Analysis and Reporting (STAR) team meetings.

Citizens for Science seminars are conducted at the UMCES Annapolis Office, 1 Park Place, Suite 325, Annapolis, MD 21401.



Inquiries

If you have any queries or would like to contribute to next year's seminar series, please contact:

Jane Thomas ()
Bill Dennison ()