IAN Seminar Series 2014

The goal of the IAN seminar series is to provide concise, thought-provoking ideas relating to Chesapeake Bay science and management. Short presentations (15 minutes maximum length) are immediately followed by a lunchtime discussion of the topics raised by the presenter. The discussion is summarized and is posted along with a pdf version of the seminar slides. The seminars are captured on video and posted under a Creative Commons license so they can be freely shared.

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DateSpeakerSeminarSeries
Thu 28
Jan
2010
http://ian.umces.edu/seminarseries/
Chesapeake Bay health: What causes positive and negative trajectories? - Bill Dennison (IAN, UMCES) - IAN Seminar Series
2010-01-28T12:00:00-05:00 2010-01-28T13:00:00-05:00
Macknis Room, Chesapeake Bay Program Office, 410 Severn Avenue (Suite 109), Annapolis MD
The Chesapeake Bay Health index, comprised of three water quality indicators (water clarity, dissolved oxygen, chlorophyll a) and three biotic indicators (submerged aquatic vegetation, benthic index of biotic integrity, phytoplankton index of biotic integrity) was calculated for 15 reporting regions to produce annual report cards. Using the same set of indicators, the Bay Health Index was calculated for previous years that data were collected by the Chesapeake Bay Program. An analysis of the data over time reveals some significant positive and negative trajectories. In three reporting regions (James River, Upper Bay and Elizabeth River), the trajectories are significantly (p < 0.10) positive, alternatively in three reporting regions, (Mid Bay, Upper Eastern Shore, Lower Western Shore of MD), the trajectories are significantly (p < 0.10) negative. Furthermore, in the Upper Western Shore there is a significant positive trajectory of the water quality index. The remaining reporting regions were not significantly positive or negative. The enigma of having improving water quality index in the Upper Western Shore immediately adjacent to the Upper Eastern Shore with degrading water quality prompts the question posed by Governor O'Malley, 'Why are some areas getting better and others getting worse?'. This very basic question is key to establishing priorities for Bay restoration and this seminar is designed to articulate the question, and begin a discussion as to causes.
Bill Dennison
IAN, UMCES
dennison@umces.edu
Chesapeake Bay health: What causes positive and negative trajectories?

Science for Citizens
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Abstract

The Chesapeake Bay Health index, comprised of three water quality indicators (water clarity, dissolved oxygen, chlorophyll a) and three biotic indicators (submerged aquatic vegetation, benthic index of biotic integrity, phytoplankton index of biotic integrity) was calculated for 15 reporting regions to produce annual report cards. Using the same set of indicators, the Bay Health Index was calculated for previous years that data were collected by the Chesapeake Bay Program. An analysis of the data over time reveals some significant positive and negative trajectories. In three reporting regions (James River, Upper Bay and Elizabeth River), the trajectories are significantly (p < 0.10) positive, alternatively in three reporting regions, (Mid Bay, Upper Eastern Shore, Lower Western Shore of MD), the trajectories are significantly (p < 0.10) negative. Furthermore, in the Upper Western Shore there is a significant positive trajectory of the water quality index. The remaining reporting regions were not significantly positive or negative. The enigma of having improving water quality index in the Upper Western Shore immediately adjacent to the Upper Eastern Shore with degrading water quality prompts the question posed by Governor O'Malley, 'Why are some areas getting better and others getting worse?'. This very basic question is key to establishing priorities for Bay restoration and this seminar is designed to articulate the question, and begin a discussion as to causes.



Time and Venue

Seminars start at 12 noon, scheduled for 45 mins (15 mins plus 30 min question/discussion time).

Science for Citizens seminars are held in the Joe Macknis Conference Room (Fish Shack) at the Chesapeake Bay Program Office, 410 Severn Avenue, Annapolis MD 21403, immediately following the monthly meetings of the Science Technical Analysis and Reporting (STAR) team meetings.

Citizens for Science seminars are conducted at the UMCES Annapolis Office, 1 Park Place, Suite 325, Annapolis, MD 21401.



Inquiries

If you have any queries or would like to contribute to next year's seminar series, please contact:

Jane Thomas ()
Bill Dennison ()