IAN Seminar Series 2014

The goal of the IAN seminar series is to provide concise, thought-provoking ideas relating to Chesapeake Bay science and management. Short presentations (15 minutes maximum length) are immediately followed by a lunchtime discussion of the topics raised by the presenter. The discussion is summarized and is posted along with a pdf version of the seminar slides. The seminars are captured on video and posted under a Creative Commons license so they can be freely shared.

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DateSpeakerSeminarSeries
Thu 25
Feb
2010
http://ian.umces.edu/seminarseries/
Getting out of the Lake and into the Watershed: a study of volunteer monitoring efforts, water quality, and community outreach - Sara Powell (EcoCheck) - IAN Seminar Series
2010-02-25T12:00:00-05:00 2010-02-25T13:00:00-05:00
Macknis Room, Chesapeake Bay Program Office, 410 Severn Avenue (Suite 109), Annapolis MD
In 2008, an innovative partnership between the University of South Carolina and Lake Wateree, SC homeowners began in order to restart previously existing water quality monitoring efforts, provide data analysis, and make resulting information easily accessible to stakeholders. This project explored effective ways to foster links between 'science' and people - i.e. how to most effectively communicate scientific concepts and monitoring results to stakeholders addressing real world concerns. Lake Wateree spans three counties in South Carolina and is the last in a series of eleven reservoirs within the Catawba/Wateree watershed that stretches across North and South Carolina. It is an important resource for recreation and municipal water use, and from 1999-2003, volunteers sampled monthly at sites across the lake in an effort to monitor water quality. The original intent was to use the data to appeal to decision-makers for action if needed, however no rigorous analyses were conducted, and therefore no tangible results were produced, causing interest and participation to wane. Following the Catawba-Wateree River's designation as 'America's Most Endangered River' in 2008 by American Rivers, there was renewed interest in regularly monitoring the health of Lake Wateree by home and property owners on the lake. Partnering with USC allowed the homeowners to revamp and restart their monitoring efforts, and to establish standard protocols and data collection methods. Currently, after each monthly sampling run, USC personnel download the raw data and generate a report that is sent back to the homeowners associations for dissemination. The reports by request are basic and do not include extensive comparison with past monitoring results. To address this, an interactive, website incorporating Google Maps was developed so that interested persons can access all past reports as well as additional relevant information, and learn about the monitoring efforts taking place on the lake (http://sites.google.com/site/watereewaterwatch/). Collaboration between USC and the homeowners has resulted thus far in: increased volunteer participation, community wide meetings on the importance of water quality, publicity in a variety of news outlets, and reception of a $5,000 grant (applied for by a homeowner) in support of the project. Since volunteer based monitoring is recognized as a way for citizens to translate knowledge into action, make informed decisions, and provide information to influence future resource management strategies, the expectation is that this partnership will ultimately result in greater public support for monitoring and stewardship of Lake Wateree and the surrounding watersheds.
Sara Powell
EcoCheck
Sara.Powell@noaa.gov
Getting out of the Lake and into the Watershed: a study of volunteer monitoring efforts, water quality, and community outreach

Science for Citizens
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Abstract

In 2008, an innovative partnership between the University of South Carolina and Lake Wateree, SC homeowners began in order to restart previously existing water quality monitoring efforts, provide data analysis, and make resulting information easily accessible to stakeholders. This project explored effective ways to foster links between 'science' and people - i.e. how to most effectively communicate scientific concepts and monitoring results to stakeholders addressing real world concerns. Lake Wateree spans three counties in South Carolina and is the last in a series of eleven reservoirs within the Catawba/Wateree watershed that stretches across North and South Carolina. It is an important resource for recreation and municipal water use, and from 1999-2003, volunteers sampled monthly at sites across the lake in an effort to monitor water quality. The original intent was to use the data to appeal to decision-makers for action if needed, however no rigorous analyses were conducted, and therefore no tangible results were produced, causing interest and participation to wane. Following the Catawba-Wateree River's designation as 'America's Most Endangered River' in 2008 by American Rivers, there was renewed interest in regularly monitoring the health of Lake Wateree by home and property owners on the lake. Partnering with USC allowed the homeowners to revamp and restart their monitoring efforts, and to establish standard protocols and data collection methods. Currently, after each monthly sampling run, USC personnel download the raw data and generate a report that is sent back to the homeowners associations for dissemination. The reports by request are basic and do not include extensive comparison with past monitoring results. To address this, an interactive, website incorporating Google Maps was developed so that interested persons can access all past reports as well as additional relevant information, and learn about the monitoring efforts taking place on the lake (http://sites.google.com/site/watereewaterwatch/). Collaboration between USC and the homeowners has resulted thus far in: increased volunteer participation, community wide meetings on the importance of water quality, publicity in a variety of news outlets, and reception of a $5,000 grant (applied for by a homeowner) in support of the project. Since volunteer based monitoring is recognized as a way for citizens to translate knowledge into action, make informed decisions, and provide information to influence future resource management strategies, the expectation is that this partnership will ultimately result in greater public support for monitoring and stewardship of Lake Wateree and the surrounding watersheds.



Time and Venue

Seminars start at 12 noon, scheduled for 45 mins (15 mins plus 30 min question/discussion time).

Science for Citizens seminars are held in the Joe Macknis Conference Room (Fish Shack) at the Chesapeake Bay Program Office, 410 Severn Avenue, Annapolis MD 21403, immediately following the monthly meetings of the Science Technical Analysis and Reporting (STAR) team meetings.

Citizens for Science seminars are conducted at the UMCES Annapolis Office, 1 Park Place, Suite 325, Annapolis, MD 21401.



Inquiries

If you have any queries or would like to contribute to next year's seminar series, please contact:

Jane Thomas ()
Bill Dennison ()