IAN Seminar Series 2014

The goal of the IAN seminar series is to provide concise, thought-provoking ideas relating to Chesapeake Bay science and management. Short presentations (15 minutes maximum length) are immediately followed by a lunchtime discussion of the topics raised by the presenter. The discussion is summarized and is posted along with a pdf version of the seminar slides. The seminars are captured on video and posted under a Creative Commons license so they can be freely shared.

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DateSpeakerSeminarSeries
Thu 20
May
2010
http://ian.umces.edu/seminarseries/
The role of watershed modeling in local land management decisions in Maryland communities - Kathy Boomer (SERC) - IAN Seminar Series
2010-05-20T12:00:00-04:00 2010-05-20T13:00:00-04:00
Macknis Room, Chesapeake Bay Program Office, 410 Severn Avenue (Suite 109), Annapolis MD
To help meet Federal and state mandates to regulate nutrient discharges, Maryland now requires that all Maryland municipalities prepare a non-point source discharge assessment as part of a Comprehensive Growth Plan. This mandate presents an ideal opportunity to integrate watershed science and management. State guidelines currently suggest using the Maryland Department of Planning (MDP) Non-Point Source Assessment Spreadsheet to downscale annual average predictions from the Chesapeake Bay Program\'s HSPF Phase 4 model. The assessment tool is intended to help land managers minimize surface water quality impacts by providing nutrient load estimates under current and future land use scenarios. We implemented the MDP tool for a Maryland town, along with three watershed models, GWLF, SWAT, and the CBP-HSPF5, The differences in predicted water quality among alternative land use scenarios being considered by town planners (including a no change scenario) were small, especially compared to the variation among models in the predictions for any single scenario. In addition, all the models agreed that nutrient discharges originate primarily from outside the planning jurisdiction. Because of the dominance of external sources and the similarity among scenarios, the predicted impacts from non-point source pollution have had little influence on the Town\'s land management decisions.
Kathy Boomer
SERC
boomerk@si.edu
The role of watershed modeling in local land management decisions in Maryland communities

Science for Citizens
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Abstract

To help meet Federal and state mandates to regulate nutrient discharges, Maryland now requires that all Maryland municipalities prepare a non-point source discharge assessment as part of a Comprehensive Growth Plan. This mandate presents an ideal opportunity to integrate watershed science and management. State guidelines currently suggest using the Maryland Department of Planning (MDP) Non-Point Source Assessment Spreadsheet to downscale annual average predictions from the Chesapeake Bay Program's HSPF Phase 4 model. The assessment tool is intended to help land managers minimize surface water quality impacts by providing nutrient load estimates under current and future land use scenarios. We implemented the MDP tool for a Maryland town, along with three watershed models, GWLF, SWAT, and the CBP-HSPF5, The differences in predicted water quality among alternative land use scenarios being considered by town planners (including a no change scenario) were small, especially compared to the variation among models in the predictions for any single scenario. In addition, all the models agreed that nutrient discharges originate primarily from outside the planning jurisdiction. Because of the dominance of external sources and the similarity among scenarios, the predicted impacts from non-point source pollution have had little influence on the Town's land management decisions.



Time and Venue

Seminars start at 12 noon, scheduled for 45 mins (15 mins plus 30 min question/discussion time).

Science for Citizens seminars are held in the Joe Macknis Conference Room (Fish Shack) at the Chesapeake Bay Program Office, 410 Severn Avenue, Annapolis MD 21403, immediately following the monthly meetings of the Science Technical Analysis and Reporting (STAR) team meetings.

Citizens for Science seminars are conducted at the UMCES Annapolis Office, 1 Park Place, Suite 325, Annapolis, MD 21401.



Inquiries

If you have any queries or would like to contribute to next year's seminar series, please contact:

Jane Thomas ()
Bill Dennison ()