IAN Seminar Series 2014

The goal of the IAN seminar series is to provide concise, thought-provoking ideas relating to Chesapeake Bay science and management. Short presentations (15 minutes maximum length) are immediately followed by a lunchtime discussion of the topics raised by the presenter. The discussion is summarized and is posted along with a pdf version of the seminar slides. The seminars are captured on video and posted under a Creative Commons license so they can be freely shared.

Email Icon Subscribe to receive email reminders prior to each seminar, and when new seminars are available online.

iCal Subscribe Icon Subscribe to the iCalendar for the 2014 seminar series.

RSS Feed Icon Subscribe to our Seminar Series RSS Feed.

iTunes Icon Subscribe, or paste http://ian.umces.edu/seminarseries/seminarseries.xml into your podcasting software.

Online Seminar Archives


Select Year

Or Enter Search Term



Single Seminar
You are currently viewing a single seminar. You can browse/search by year, and search terms to view other seminars in the database.


DateSpeakerSeminarSeries
Thu 29
Jul
2010
http://ian.umces.edu/seminarseries/
Where has all the nitrogen gone? Hot spots in the land and seascape - Walter Boynton (CBL, UMCES) - IAN Seminar Series
2010-07-29T12:00:00-04:00 2010-07-29T13:00:00-04:00
Macknis Room, Chesapeake Bay Program Office, 410 Severn Avenue (Suite 109), Annapolis MD
We have done a great job at figuring out where all the nitrogen comes from, but we are a little weak on where it goes. Is it going away or will it result in longer term problems? There has been a 7-Fold increase in N since John Smith\'s arrival to Bay Area. 50% increase during first 360 yrs and 50% increase in last 40 yrs. There are quite a few hotspots in the land and sea-scape for nitrogen sources, but also areas that remove nitrogen. A mass balance for the Patuxent tidal marshes (which represent only 2% of the basin landscape) showed 48% removal of all the nitrogen coming into the system. Rates of removal are equivalent to all the sewage treatment plants on the Patuxent. Population in the basin is going up, but the area of impervious surfaces has increased even more. Historically the Chesapeake region had significantly greater wetlands area, promoted in part by beaver activity. This has resulted in significant reductions in the rates of denitrification. The bay has nutrient obesity - too much of a good thing. Restoration goals should include fostering wetland areas.
Walter Boynton
CBL, UMCES
boynton@umces.edu
Where has all the nitrogen gone? Hot spots in the land and seascape

Science for Citizens
ian logo

Abstract

We have done a great job at figuring out where all the nitrogen comes from, but we are a little weak on where it goes. Is it going away or will it result in longer term problems? There has been a 7-Fold increase in N since John Smith's arrival to Bay Area. 50% increase during first 360 yrs and 50% increase in last 40 yrs. There are quite a few hotspots in the land and sea-scape for nitrogen sources, but also areas that remove nitrogen. A mass balance for the Patuxent tidal marshes (which represent only 2% of the basin landscape) showed 48% removal of all the nitrogen coming into the system. Rates of removal are equivalent to all the sewage treatment plants on the Patuxent. Population in the basin is going up, but the area of impervious surfaces has increased even more. Historically the Chesapeake region had significantly greater wetlands area, promoted in part by beaver activity. This has resulted in significant reductions in the rates of denitrification. The bay has nutrient obesity - too much of a good thing. Restoration goals should include fostering wetland areas.



Time and Venue

Seminars start at 12 noon, scheduled for 45 mins (15 mins plus 30 min question/discussion time).

Science for Citizens seminars are held in the Joe Macknis Conference Room (Fish Shack) at the Chesapeake Bay Program Office, 410 Severn Avenue, Annapolis MD 21403, immediately following the monthly meetings of the Science Technical Analysis and Reporting (STAR) team meetings.

Citizens for Science seminars are conducted at the UMCES Annapolis Office, 1 Park Place, Suite 325, Annapolis, MD 21401.



Inquiries

If you have any queries or would like to contribute to next year's seminar series, please contact:

Jane Thomas ()
Bill Dennison ()