IAN Seminar Series 2014

The goal of the IAN seminar series is to provide concise, thought-provoking ideas relating to Chesapeake Bay science and management. Short presentations (15 minutes maximum length) are immediately followed by a lunchtime discussion of the topics raised by the presenter. The discussion is summarized and is posted along with a pdf version of the seminar slides. The seminars are captured on video and posted under a Creative Commons license so they can be freely shared.

Email Icon Subscribe to receive email reminders prior to each seminar, and when new seminars are available online.

iCal Subscribe Icon Subscribe to the iCalendar for the 2014 seminar series.

RSS Feed Icon Subscribe to our Seminar Series RSS Feed.

iTunes Icon Subscribe, or paste http://ian.umces.edu/seminarseries/seminarseries.xml into your podcasting software.

Online Seminar Archives


Select Year

Or Enter Search Term



Single Seminar
You are currently viewing a single seminar. You can browse/search by year, and search terms to view other seminars in the database.


DateSpeakerSeminarSeries
Tue 27
Jul
2010
http://ian.umces.edu/seminarseries/
Challenges and advantages of using citizen scientists for environmental monitoring - Bill Dennison (IAN, UMCES) - IAN Seminar Series
2010-07-27T12:00:00-04:00 2010-07-27T13:00:00-04:00
Macknis Room, Chesapeake Bay Program Office, 410 Severn Avenue (Suite 109), Annapolis MD
Using citizen scientists, trained volunteers who collect accurate data, to generate ecohealth report cards provides the opportunity for informal educational experiences. Ecohealth report cards, assessments of ecosystem health using a suite of indicators, can be used to enhance environmental literacy. This increased literacy will help citizen scientists achieve healthy waterways; an empowered citizenry can make informed decisions, promote environmental stewardship, and influence others to adopt behaviors that promote healthy streams, rivers, lakes, bays, and ocean. Using citizen scientists can help to reduce the significant investment in resources required for effective monitoring programs, but care must be taken to assure data quality. Currently, 8-12 mid-Atlantic watershed organizations require analysis and communication assistance from the Integration and Application Network to produce report cards. These groups express the need for technology solutions to address citizen scientist recruitment, engagement, training, and management. IAN is looking to develop a formalized report card process and create web and smartphone app portals to standardize data entry and dissemination.
Bill Dennison
IAN, UMCES
dennison@umces.edu
Challenges and advantages of using citizen scientists for environmental monitoring

Citizens for Science
mtac logo

Abstract

Using citizen scientists, trained volunteers who collect accurate data, to generate ecohealth report cards provides the opportunity for informal educational experiences. Ecohealth report cards, assessments of ecosystem health using a suite of indicators, can be used to enhance environmental literacy. This increased literacy will help citizen scientists achieve healthy waterways; an empowered citizenry can make informed decisions, promote environmental stewardship, and influence others to adopt behaviors that promote healthy streams, rivers, lakes, bays, and ocean. Using citizen scientists can help to reduce the significant investment in resources required for effective monitoring programs, but care must be taken to assure data quality. Currently, 8-12 mid-Atlantic watershed organizations require analysis and communication assistance from the Integration and Application Network to produce report cards. These groups express the need for technology solutions to address citizen scientist recruitment, engagement, training, and management. IAN is looking to develop a formalized report card process and create web and smartphone app portals to standardize data entry and dissemination.



Time and Venue

Seminars start at 12 noon, scheduled for 45 mins (15 mins plus 30 min question/discussion time).

Science for Citizens seminars are held in the Joe Macknis Conference Room (Fish Shack) at the Chesapeake Bay Program Office, 410 Severn Avenue, Annapolis MD 21403, immediately following the monthly meetings of the Science Technical Analysis and Reporting (STAR) team meetings.

Citizens for Science seminars are conducted at the UMCES Annapolis Office, 1 Park Place, Suite 325, Annapolis, MD 21401.



Inquiries

If you have any queries or would like to contribute to next year's seminar series, please contact:

Jane Thomas ()
Bill Dennison ()