IAN Seminar Series 2014

The goal of the IAN seminar series is to provide concise, thought-provoking ideas relating to Chesapeake Bay science and management. Short presentations (15 minutes maximum length) are immediately followed by a lunchtime discussion of the topics raised by the presenter. The discussion is summarized and is posted along with a pdf version of the seminar slides. The seminars are captured on video and posted under a Creative Commons license so they can be freely shared.

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DateSpeakerSeminarSeries
Tue 30
Nov
2010
http://ian.umces.edu/seminarseries/
Reef Water Quality Protection Plan Report Card: Paddock to the Great Barrier Reef - Chris Chinn (QDPC) - IAN Seminar Series
2010-11-30T12:00:00-05:00 2010-11-30T13:00:00-05:00
Macknis Room, Chesapeake Bay Program Office, 410 Severn Avenue (Suite 109), Annapolis MD
The Queensland government, as part of the Paddock to Reef Program, is preparing an annual report card on the health of the Great Barrier Reef. The report card utilizes monitoring and modeling from the paddock (farm) scale through the riverways and down to the reef scale. The Great Barrier Reef is a world heritage site, encompassing 2900 reefs, in addition to seagrass meadows and mangrove habitats. The GBR spans 2300km along the Australian coastline. Reef health is threatened by numerous impacts, among them climate change, shipping, coastal development, and point source pollution; the Paddock to Reef Program focuses on diffuse source pollution from agriculture. The Reef Plan contains several targets aimed at improving land management practices for wetland loss, riparian cover, and groundcover. Land practices are graded on an ABCD scheme, with excellent practices that have high water quality benefits earning a grade \'A\' and poor practices having a grade \'D\'. Catchment indicators, catchment loads, and marine indicators are also integrated into the report card. Practice adoption data is collected by industries and graded on the ABCD framework. The main industries along the Queensland coast include bananas, grazing, cropping, sugar cane, and horticulture. Multiple lines of evidence are a critical aspect of the program, starting with practice adoption (verified with land use, bare ground index), practice effectiveness (rainfall simulation activities, plot monitoring, paddock models), water quality reductions at different basin scales, and ecosystem outcomes with marine monitoring (water quality, coral and seagrass health).
Chris Chinn
QDPC
Chris.Chinn@premiers.qld.gov.au

Carl Mitchell (Reef Catchments)
carl.mitchell@reefcatchments.com.au
Reef Water Quality Protection Plan Report Card: Paddock to the Great Barrier Reef

Citizens for Science
mtac logo

Abstract

The Queensland government, as part of the Paddock to Reef Program, is preparing an annual report card on the health of the Great Barrier Reef. The report card utilizes monitoring and modeling from the paddock (farm) scale through the riverways and down to the reef scale. The Great Barrier Reef is a world heritage site, encompassing 2900 reefs, in addition to seagrass meadows and mangrove habitats. The GBR spans 2300km along the Australian coastline. Reef health is threatened by numerous impacts, among them climate change, shipping, coastal development, and point source pollution; the Paddock to Reef Program focuses on diffuse source pollution from agriculture. The Reef Plan contains several targets aimed at improving land management practices for wetland loss, riparian cover, and groundcover. Land practices are graded on an ABCD scheme, with excellent practices that have high water quality benefits earning a grade 'A' and poor practices having a grade 'D'. Catchment indicators, catchment loads, and marine indicators are also integrated into the report card. Practice adoption data is collected by industries and graded on the ABCD framework. The main industries along the Queensland coast include bananas, grazing, cropping, sugar cane, and horticulture. Multiple lines of evidence are a critical aspect of the program, starting with practice adoption (verified with land use, bare ground index), practice effectiveness (rainfall simulation activities, plot monitoring, paddock models), water quality reductions at different basin scales, and ecosystem outcomes with marine monitoring (water quality, coral and seagrass health).



Time and Venue

Seminars start at 12 noon, scheduled for 45 mins (15 mins plus 30 min question/discussion time).

Science for Citizens seminars are held in the Joe Macknis Conference Room (Fish Shack) at the Chesapeake Bay Program Office, 410 Severn Avenue, Annapolis MD 21403, immediately following the monthly meetings of the Science Technical Analysis and Reporting (STAR) team meetings.

Citizens for Science seminars are conducted at the UMCES Annapolis Office, 1 Park Place, Suite 325, Annapolis, MD 21401.



Inquiries

If you have any queries or would like to contribute to next year's seminar series, please contact:

Jane Thomas ()
Bill Dennison ()