UMCES in the Media

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Fox 21 Delmarva (Tue 1 Apr, 2014)
Bay Bridge Boat Show Adopts Family Friendly Theme
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This article was originally distributed via PRWeb. PRWeb, WorldNow and this Site make no warranties or representations in connection therewith.


WJHL 11 (Tue 1 Apr, 2014)
Bay Bridge Boat Show Adopts Family Friendly Theme
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Stevensville, Maryland (PRWEB) April 01, 2014


WRBL News 3 (Tue 1 Apr, 2014)
Bay Bridge Boat Show Adopts Family Friendly Theme
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Stevensville, Maryland (PRWEB) April 01, 2014


WTRF 7 (Tue 1 Apr, 2014)
Bay Bridge Boat Show Adopts Family Friendly Theme
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Stevensville, Maryland (PRWEB) April 01, 2014


Stormwater Report (Mon 31 Mar, 2014)
University of Maryland Study Examines Effective Chesapeake Bay Management Practices
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A new report by the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science (UMCES) looks at 40 case studies in the Chesapeake Bay watershed to determine which management practices have been most effective. According to the report, "New Insights: Science-based evidence of water quality improvements, challenges, and opportunities in the Chesapeake," upgrading water resource recovery facilities, lowering vehicle and power plant emissions, and reducing runoff from farmland have been most effective at reducing sediment and nutrients.


Bay Journal (Mon 31 Mar, 2014)
Local actions leading to better water quality in some watersheds: Wastewater upgrades, reduced air pollution, animal fencing achieving the greatest results.
Staff quoted: Don Boesch, Bill Dennison
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When one looks at the Bay as a whole, the picture is often grim. Water clarity is worsening, underwater grass beds are declining, and oxygen-starved dead zones aren't going away.


Capital Gazette (Sun 30 Mar, 2014)
My Time: Donald Boesch talks about sea levels at Severn River Association
Staff quoted: Don Boesch
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There's no denying that global sea levels are on the rise worldwide and that the effects are much more pronounced in the Chesapeake Bay region. Sea levels already have risen a foot in Baltimore harbor and could rise close to another foot by 2020 — perhaps as much as seven feet by 2100.


The Star Democrat (Mon 24 Mar, 2014)
Oyster shell planting deal struck
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ANNAPOLIS — Though it's not exactly what county oyster committees wanted, a deal was struck Friday with the Department of Natural Resources for a natural spat reproduction pilot program on certain oyster bars in the Chesapeake Bay.


Bay Journal (Mon 24 Mar, 2014)
Shell shortage leaves some oystermen unhappy with their options
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Oystermen on Maryland's Eastern Shore are upset with their options when it comes to purchasing oyster shells from the state. The shells are becoming an increasingly scarce and costly commodity throughout the region.


My Eastern Shore (Sun 23 Mar, 2014)
The attack of the grouper troopers
Staff quoted: Bill Dennison
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I see that the Chesapeake Bay Program is taking credit for the Bay watershed becoming cleaner. Bill Dennison, vice president for science applications at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, said, "We can see this progress in something that can really be measurable and real it's not going to be hopeless. In fact, it's quite hopeful."


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