UMCES in the Media

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Science Newsline (Thu 9 Apr, 2015)
More Food, Low Pollution Effort Gains Traction
Staff quoted: Eric Davidson
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FROSTBURG, MD (April 9, 2015)--Nitrogen fertilizers make it possible to feed more people in the world than ever before. However, too much of it can also harm the environment. Professor Eric Davidson, director of the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science's Appalachian Laboratory, has been leading a group of scientists, economists, social scientists, and agriculture experts in figuring out how to produce more food while lowering pollution at the same time. He calls it a "Mo Fo Lo Po": more food, low pollution.


The Bay Net News (Tue 7 Apr, 2015)
More pollution entering Chesapeake Bay than expected
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Annapolis, MD - The data released April 6 by the Chesapeake Bay Program, though incomplete, show that the agricultural sector has a long way to go in meeting Chesapeake Bay cleanup goals. Estimated loads of nitrogen and sediment from agriculture increased between 2013 and 2014, and are still millions of pounds shy of 2017 targets. Estimated loads of phosphorus are still incomplete because the model does not yet account for phosphorus-saturated soils.


Agronomy (Tue 7 Apr, 2015)
Nitrogen in a "mo fo lo po" world
Staff quoted: Eric Davidson
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Nitrogen is a critical element to growing healthy food. It's a nutrient that helps plants grow. It's the elemental backbone of proteins. However, managing nitrogen levels in soils has created debate over the decades. Recently, a group of scientists, industry representatives, farmers, and government and non-government organization members met to discuss managing nitrogen on farms with the goal of "Mo Fo Lo Po:" more food, low pollution.


Soil Science (Tue 7 Apr, 2015)
Nitrogen in a "mo fo lo po" world
Staff quoted: Eric Davidson
Article Link Permanent Link

Nitrogen is a critical element to growing healthy food. It's a nutrient that helps plants grow. It's the elemental backbone of proteins. However, managing nitrogen levels in soils has created debate over the decades. Recently, a group of scientists, industry representatives, farmers, and government and non-government organization members met to discuss managing nitrogen on farms with the goal of "Mo Fo Lo Po:" more food, low pollution.


Undercurrent News (Fri 3 Apr, 2015)
Four aquaculture projects get funding from University of Maryland initiative
Staff quoted: Don Meritt, Allen Place
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Four projects focused on aquaculture on the US state of Maryland are getting funding from the Maryland Industrial Partnerships (MIPS) program.


WSFA News 12 (Thu 2 Apr, 2015)
UMD Program Approves 15 Technology Product Development Projects Teaming Maryland Companies With System Faculty
Staff quoted: Russell Hill
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Four aquaculture projects highlight round


WYPR (NPR) Radio (Tue 31 Mar, 2015)
Protections for Honey Bees Killed by Farm Lobby
Staff quoted: Eric Schott
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Populations of honey bees have been falling over the last decade, eliminating pollinators necessary for the farming of many fruits, vegetables, and nuts.


WAMU (NPR) News (Fri 27 Mar, 2015)
How A Maryland Hatchery Is Helping Chesapeake Bay Oysters Bounce Back
Staff quoted: Don Meritt, Stephanie Alexander
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Maryland harvests of native oyster are, by some estimates, now less than 1 percent of what they once were. And the dramatic decline of this pollution-filtering bivalve has changed the entire ecology of the Chesapeake Bay. But scientists say all hope is not lost for the humble oyster.


Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (Thu 26 Mar, 2015)
Sponge symbionts and the marine P cycle
Staff quoted: Fan Zhang
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Marine sponges are ubiquitous colonizers of shallow, clear-water environments in the oceans (1, 2). Sponges have emerged as significant mediators of biogeochemical fluxes in coastal zones by virtue of respiring organic matter and facilitating both the consumption and release of nutrients (3, 4). Sponges gain their nutrition through filtering out plankton and organic detritus and through uptake of dissolved organic matter from seawater (4). Many species host diverse microbial symbiont communities that contribute to digestion and nutrient release from the filtered organics, and in some species cyanobacterial symbionts can supply fresh photosynthate to meet a substantial fraction of the sponge energy requirements (5). In PNAS, Zhang et al. (6) reveal a major and heretofore unknown role for sponges with regard to the marine phosphorus cycle. The authors present strong evidence for polyphosphate (poly-P) production and storage by sponge endosymbionts. Zhang et al. also may have detected apatite, a calcium phosphate mineral, in sponge tissue. This work has major implications for our understanding of nutrient cycling in reef environments, the roles played by microbial endosymbiont communities in general, and aspects of P cycling on geologic timescales.


Annapolis Green (Wed 25 Mar, 2015)
University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science: 90 Years
Staff quoted: Bill Dennison
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