UMCES in the Media

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Science Newsline (Mon 23 Feb, 2015)
Scientists Discover Bacteria in Marine Sponges Harvest Phosphorus for the Reef Community
Staff quoted: Russell Hill, Fan Zhang
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BALTIMORE, MD (February 23, 2015)--Did you ever wonder why the water is so clear around coral reefs? Scientists have known for years that sponges can filter water and gather nutrients from the ocean, making it appear crystal clear. For the first time scientists at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science (UMCES) have identified that bacteria on sponges are harvesting phosphorus from the water for the reef ecosystem to use for nourishment. The findings were published in the February 23 issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.


Physorg (Mon 23 Feb, 2015)
Scientists discover bacteria in marine sponges harvest phosphorus for the reef community
Staff quoted: Russell Hill, Fan Zhang
Article Link Permanent Link

Did you ever wonder why the water is so clear around coral reefs? Scientists have known for years that sponges can filter water and gather nutrients from the ocean, making it appear crystal clear. For the first time scientists at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science (UMCES) have identified that bacteria on sponges are harvesting phosphorus from the water for the reef ecosystem to use for nourishment. The findings were published in the February 23 issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.


Science Daily (Mon 23 Feb, 2015)
Bacteria in marine sponges harvest phosphorus for reef community
Staff quoted: Russell Hill, Fan Zhang
Article Link Permanent Link

Did you ever wonder why the water is so clear around coral reefs? Scientists have known for years that sponges can filter water and gather nutrients from the ocean, making it appear crystal clear. For the first time scientists at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science (UMCES) have identified that bacteria on sponges are harvesting phosphorus from the water for the reef ecosystem to use for nourishment. The findings were published in the February 23 issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.


The Star Democrat (Fri 20 Feb, 2015)
Horn Point to study Susquehanna sediments, nutrients
Staff quoted: Mike Roman, Jeff Cornwell, Cindy Palinkas, Ming Li, Larry Sanford, Jeremy Testa, Mike Kemp
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CAMBRIDGE — A team of scientists at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science is starting a two-year study to determine the amount of sediment and associated nutrients present in major entry points to the Lower Susquehanna River Reservoir System and the upper Chesapeake Bay.


The Baltimore Sun B'More Green Blog (Fri 20 Feb, 2015)
UM scientists launch new Conowingo pollution study
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Wading into a politically fraught issue, a team of Maryland scientists is trying to pin down how much of the sediment and nutrient pollution fouling the Chesapeake Bay after big storms comes from the Conowingo Dam and how much from other sources farther up the Susquehanna River.


My Eastern Shore MD (Fri 20 Feb, 2015)
Horn Point to study Susquehanna sediments, nutrients
Staff quoted: Mike Roman, Jeff Cornwell, Cindy Palinkas, Ming Li, Larry Sanford, Jeremy Testa, Mike Kemp
Article Link Permanent Link

CAMBRIDGE — A team of scientists at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science is starting a two-year study to determine the amount of sediment and associated nutrients present in major entry points to the Lower Susquehanna River Reservoir System and the upper Chesapeake Bay.


The Talbot Spy (Thu 19 Feb, 2015)
Eastern Shore's Horn Point Lab to Quantify Sediment/Nutrient Impact on Bay
Staff quoted: Mike Roman, Jeff Cornwell, Cindy Palinkas, Ming Li, Larry Sanford, Jeremy Testa, Mike Kemp
Article Link Permanent Link

A team of scientists at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science (UMCES) is beginning a two-year study to quantify the amount of sediment and associated nutrients present in major entry points to the Lower Susquehanna River Reservoir System and the upper Chesapeake Bay. Scientists at the UMCES Horn Point Laboratory are building on a recent assessment led by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers that analyzed the movement of sediment and associated nutrient loads through the lower Susquehanna River watershed to the upper Chesapeake Bay. Although the entire Lower Reservoir System will be investigated, special emphasis will be given to sediment and nutrient loads into and out of Conowingo Pond during high flow events. This study will help policymakers determine the best management options to reduce this effect.


The Diamondback (Tue 17 Feb, 2015)
UMD sponsored programs address disappearing bay oyster population
Staff quoted: Ken Paynter
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Oysters are the "kidney" of the Chesapeake Bay, filtering up to 50 gallons of water, algae, sediment and nitrogen each day, according to the Chesapeake Bay Foundation. But the small shellfish are often forgotten next to the Old Bay-covered signature crustacean: the blue crab.


The Baltimore Sun B'More Green Blog (Mon 16 Feb, 2015)
Forum eyes impact of rising seas on Shore
Staff quoted: Don Boesch
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How the low-lying Eastern Shore will cope with rising sea levels will be explored Saturday at Chesapeake College in Wye Mills.


Capital Gazette (Sun 15 Feb, 2015)
Guest Column: Sea-level rise a threat to downtown that needs attention soon
Staff quoted: Don Boesch
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"High Water" reads the yellow, diamond-shaped sign frequently posted outside the Annapolis Harbormaster's office at City Dock. It's a temporary sign, bolstered by sandbags, but given the frequency of "nuisance flooding" around City Dock, the harbormaster might well leave it up all the time.


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