UMCES in the Media

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The Washington Examiner (Fri 11 Jun, 2010)
Young oysters in Chesapeake Bay are getting shell-shocked
Staff quoted: Roger Newell
Article Link Permanent Link

The shells of young oysters in the Chesapeake Bay are getting thinner due to increased levels of acidity in the water, according to a new study from the University of Maryland Center for Environment Science.


Southern Maryland News (Fri 11 Jun, 2010)
Salons collect hair for BP oil spill relief
Staff quoted: Carys Mitchelmore
Article Link Permanent Link

Mary Lou Rutherford, co-owner of Classic Image Salon and Day Spa in Waldorf, shows off the latest bag of hair collected to aid attempts to clean up the BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.


WTOP Radio News (Thu 10 Jun, 2010)
Oyster formation impacted by acidity in Bay
Staff quoted: Roger Newell
Article Link Permanent Link

CHESAPEAKE BAY, Md. - The shells of young oysters in Chesapeake Bay aren't getting as thick as they've been in the past, and higher acidity levels are to blame, scientists say.


The Associated Press (Thu 10 Jun, 2010)
Study: Algae Making Some Parts Of Bay More Acidic
Staff quoted: Roger Newell
Article Link Permanent Link

CAMBRIDGE, Md. (AP) ― A new study finds pollution-fed algae could be making some parts of the Chesapeake Bay more acidic, posing another threat to the bay's struggling oyster population.


Wired Magazine (Thu 10 Jun, 2010)
No Progress on Better Chemicals for Oil Disaster Cleanup
Staff quoted: Carys Mitchelmore
Article Link Permanent Link

Almost three weeks after federal orders to find less toxic chemicals to break up oil in the Gulf of Mexico, no progress has been made.


The New York Times (Wed 9 Jun, 2010)
Plumes of Oil Below Surface Raise New Concerns
Staff quoted: Carys Mitchelmore
Article Link Permanent Link

The government and university researchers confirmed Tuesday that plumes of dispersed oil were spreading far below the ocean surface from the leaking well in the Gulf of Mexico, raising fresh concern about the potential impact of the spill on sea life.


The Baltimore Sun B'More Green Blog (Wed 9 Jun, 2010)
Maryland scientists to study Gulf spill impact
Staff quoted: Mike Roman, Bill Boicourt, Jamie Pierson
Article Link Permanent Link

A trio of Maryland scientists are headed to the Gulf of Mexico this summer to see how the massive oil leak there has affected the northern Gulf's fish and the crittters on which they feed.


WMDT (Salisbury) Television (Wed 9 Jun, 2010)
Local Researchers Headed To Gulf
Staff quoted: Mike Roman, Bill Boicourt, Jamie Pierson
Article Link Permanent Link

CAMBRIDGE, Md. - Tuesday, we told you about a group of local researchers set to hit the Gulf of Mexico this summer. Wednesday, we spoke with Dr. Michael Roman, who is headed to Louisiana to examine the issues below the surface with two of his colleagues.


WJZ (Baltimore) Television (Wed 9 Jun, 2010)
Md. Scientists To Examine Impact Of Gulf Oil Spill
Staff quoted: Mike Roman
Article Link Permanent Link

As oil continues to spew into the Gulf of Mexico, scientists from Maryland got the call to examine the impact. To determine the impact oil is having on life out in the Gulf, Alex DeMetrick reports University of Maryland scientists have been selected to look for answers.


WBOC (Salisbury) Television (Tue 8 Jun, 2010)
Horn Point Laboratory Scientists to Study Oil Spill Effects in Gulf
Staff quoted: Mike Roman, Bill Boicourt, Jamie Pierson
Article Link Permanent Link

CAMBRIDGE, Md.- A team of scientists from the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science Horn Point Laboratory will be traveling to the Gulf of Mexico later this summer to study the potential effects of the oil spill on plankton and fish communities in the northern Gulf.


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