UMCES in the Media

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Thanks to cutting-edge research on today's most pressing environmental problems, we are developing new ideas to help guide our state, nation and world toward a more environmentally sustainable future.

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The Annapolis Capital (Fri 10 Jul, 2009)
State to buy crabbing licenses: Reverse auction designed to prevent overfishing
Staff quoted: Doug Lipton
Article Link Permanent Link

The state is looking to buy the licenses of thousands of part-time crabbers. But there's a hitch: The price hasn't been set yet.


United Press International (Tue 7 Jul, 2009)
Seagrass beds are dying worldwide
Staff quoted: Bill Dennison
Article Link Permanent Link

BALTIMORE, July 7 (UPI) -- The decline in seagrass beds is accelerating at a disturbing rate due to coastal development and related activities, a U.S. university study revealed.


The Baltimore Business Journal (Fri 3 Jul, 2009)
New UMBI research collaborative could attract more federal funds
Staff quoted: UMCES
Permanent Link

Leading stem cell and genomics researchers from the University of Maryland, Baltimore may move into downtown Baltimore's Columbus Center next year to collaborate with researchers at the University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute.


Reuters (Thu 2 Jul, 2009)
Loss of world's seagrass beds seen accelerating
Staff quoted: Bill Dennison
Article Link Permanent Link

MIAMI (Reuters) - The world's seagrass meadows, a critical habitat for marine life and profit-maker for the fishing industry, are in decline due to coastal development and the losses are accelerating, according to a new study.


Bay Journal (Wed 1 Jul, 2009)
Congress told about impact of global warming on Bay, coastal communities: Effects of sea level rise on tourism, and rising temperatures on fisheries only part of the testimony
Staff quoted: Don Boesch
Article Link Permanent Link

The small Bayside town of North Beach on Maryland's lower Western Shore was founded in 1910 and its economy has been built around the beach for which it is named.


The Baltimore Sun (Wed 1 Jul, 2009)
A new way to farm fish and feed the world: Scientists at Columbus Center hope to show viability of 'greener' aquaculture
Staff quoted: Doug Lipton
Article Link Permanent Link

Yonathan Zohar beams like a proud parent as he cradles the freshly netted fish in his hands.


Bay Journal (Wed 1 Jul, 2009)
Review of past oyster research reveals lack of coordination: Scientists say future projects should require pre-assessment and post-evaluation components
Staff quoted: Jon Kramer, Vic Kennedy
Article Link Permanent Link

A group of scientists recently reviewed the results from hundreds of oyster restoration projects that took place over the last 18 years. They found a lot less than they expected.


The Caroline Times Record (Wed 1 Jul, 2009)
Symposium held on how to rectify Choptank River's problems, reverse trends
Staff quoted: Heath Kelsey
Permanent Link

While the Chesapeake Bay earned a "C-" in terms of health from environmental organization Chesapeake EcoCheck, the Choptank River received a lower score of a "D," prompting the Caroline County Office of Planning, Codes and Engineering to hold a symposium on potential causes for and methods of improving the waterway's condition.


The Easton Star Democrat (Tue 30 Jun, 2009)
Choptank 'D' graded
Staff quoted: Heath Kelsey, Tom Fisher
Permanent Link

DENTON - While the Chesapeake Bay earned a "C-" in terms of health from environmental organization Chesapeake EcoCheck, the Choptank River received the lower score of a "D," prompting the Caroline County Office of Planning, Codes and Engineering to hold a symposium on potential causes for and methods of improving the waterway's condition.


Mongabay.com (Tue 30 Jun, 2009)
Coastal seagrass disappearing as quickly as coral reefs and rainforests
Staff quoted: Bill Dennison, Tim Carruthers
Article Link Permanent Link

Findings from the first comprehensive global survey of coastal seagrass ecosystems are nothing to cheer about. Fifty-eight percent of seagrass meadows are declining, according to an international team of scientists who compiled data from 215 studies and 1,800 observations of seagrass habitat beginning in 1879. Since that year, 29 percent of seagrass ecosystems have vanished entirely.


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