UMCES in the Media

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Nature News (Mon 11 Jan, 2010)
Harmful algae stun their prey: Toxic blooms may help single-celled algae to eat their competitors
Staff quoted: Allen Place, Diane Stoecker
Article Link Permanent Link

The toxins produced by some algal blooms may have evolved to give predatory algae an advantage when it comes to capturing their prey, researchers say. Knowing how algae use toxins in nature could help scientists who are trying to predict when and where the devastating blooms, sometimes called 'red tides', are going to strike.


The Easton Star Democrat (Mon 11 Jan, 2010)
Remaining ram statue will serve as basis for replacements
Staff quoted: Mike Roman
Permanent Link

CAMBRIDGE - Don Pedro will be returning to the entrance of the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science-Horn Point Laboratory after laboratory officials determined a damaged du Pont ram statue, which was recovered after the two ram statues were stolen Sept. 10, is in good enough condition to make a new casting for two new statues.


Watertown (NY) Daily News (Mon 11 Jan, 2010)
Editorial: Mountaintop mining - Scientific review condemns the practice
Staff quoted: Margaret Palmer
Article Link Permanent Link

A group of 12 scientists who have studied the environmental effects of mountaintop mining strongly condemn the practice and recommend that the government stop granting permits for it.


Washington Post News Service (Sun 10 Jan, 2010)
Mountaintop coal mining must end, researchers say
Staff quoted: Margaret Palmer
Article Link Permanent Link

Mountaintop coal mining - in which Appalachian peaks are blasted off and stream valleys buried under tons of rubble - is so destructive that the government should stop giving out new permits to do it, a group of scientists said in a paper released Thursday.


The Washington Post (Fri 8 Jan, 2010)
Scientists say mountaintop mining should be stopped
Staff quoted: Margaret Palmer, Keith Eshleman
Article Link Permanent Link

Mountaintop coal mining -- in which Appalachian peaks are blasted off and stream valleys buried under tons of rubble -- is so destructive that the government should stop giving out new permits to do it, a group of scientists said in a paper released Thursday.


The Baltimore Sun B'More Green Blog (Fri 8 Jan, 2010)
Scientists call for halt to mountaintop coal mining
Staff quoted: Margaret Palmer
Article Link Permanent Link

A dozen scientists, including three from Maryland, have called for a halt to mountaintop coal mining in Appalachia, saying there's overwhelming evidence the practice of blasting the tops off mountains to get at the fuel is causing serious and long-lasting environmental damage and likely is hurting the health of the people who live nearby.


The Charleston (WV) Daily Mail (Fri 8 Jan, 2010)
Scientists urge end to mountaintop mining permits
Staff quoted: Margaret Palmer, Keith Eshleman
Article Link Permanent Link

CHARLESTON, W.Va.--The country's existing mountaintop removal regulations are inadequate and are leading to "pervasive and irreversible" damage to the environment and threatening human health, according to an article in a leading national science journal.


Los Angeles Times (Fri 8 Jan, 2010)
Pressure builds against mountaintop coal mining: The Obama administration, which has pledged to heed scientific expertise on the issue, should reject all new mountaintop removal permits, scientists say, citing environmental and health effects.
Staff quoted: Margaret Palmer
Article Link Permanent Link

Mountaintop coal mining, which involves blowing up mountain peaks to get access to coal seams below, should be halted immediately because of growing evidence of its environmental and health threats, scientists urged Thursday in the journal Science.


Epoch Times (Fri 8 Jan, 2010)
Scientists Call for Moratorium on Mountaintop Mining Permits
Staff quoted: Margaret Palmer, Keith Eshleman
Article Link Permanent Link

A day after a controversial permit was issued for mountaintop mining in West Virginia, a group of leading environmental scientists is saying the practice has a severe impact on the environment and humans.


Scientific American (Fri 8 Jan, 2010)
Mountaintop removal mining: EPA says yes, scientists say no
Staff quoted: Margaret Palmer, Keith Eshleman
Article Link Permanent Link

On the heels of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announcement that it would allow a proposed coal mine involving mountaintop removal to go forward, 12 environmental scientists have published a review of the practice that condemns it in no uncertain terms. "Mining permits are being issued despite the preponderance of scientific evidence that impacts are pervasive and irreversible and that mitigation cannot compensate for losses," the scientists wrote in the January 8 issue of Science. "Regulators should no longer ignore rigorous science."


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