UMCES in the Media

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Thanks to cutting-edge research on today's most pressing environmental problems, we are developing new ideas to help guide our state, nation and world toward a more environmentally sustainable future.

Our researchers are recognized for their ability to explain today’s complex issues in ways that help non-scientists better understand our environment.

To reach an expert, contact Amy Pelsinsky at 410-330-1390 or apelsinsky@umces.edu.

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The Baltimore Business Journal (Fri 11 Dec, 2015)
Russell Hill Recognition Plaque
Staff quoted: Russell Hill
Article Link Permanent Link

Russell Hill


The Daily Record (Thu 10 Dec, 2015)
Russell Hill | INSTITUTE OF MARINE AND ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY
Staff quoted: Russell Hill
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Dr. Russell Hill, with the Institute of Marine and Environmental Technology, graduated from the Leadership Maryland professional development program dedicated to building a better Maryland.


EOS (Earth & Space Science News) (Wed 9 Dec, 2015)
Despite Stalled Regulations, U.S. Mercury Emissions Decline
Staff quoted: Mark Castro
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In June, the U.S. Supreme Court blocked a rule from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) that aimed to limit mercury in power plant emissions. This rule, the Mercury and Air Toxics Standards (MATS), was the second major mercury pollution control in less than a decade to be overturned in a federal court. But a new study in Environmental Science and Technology reveals a paradoxical trend: national mercury emissions are dropping, and that drop is detectable even at the local level.


Science Daily (Wed 9 Dec, 2015)
Air pollutions control policies effective in improving downwind air quality
Staff quoted: Mark Castro
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Emissions controls on coal-fired power plants are making a difference in reducing exposure of mercury to people, especially in the western Maryland community. A study of air quality from the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science found that levels of mercury in the air from power plant emissions dropped more than half over a 10-year period, coinciding with stricter pollution controls.


Physorg (Wed 9 Dec, 2015)
Air pollutions control policies effective in improving downwind air quality
Staff quoted: Mark Castro
Article Link Permanent Link

Emissions controls on coal-fired power plants are making a difference in reducing exposure of mercury to people, especially in the western Maryland community. A study of air quality from the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science found that levels of mercury in the air from power plant emissions dropped more than half over a 10-year period, coinciding with stricter pollution controls.


The Hill (Wed 9 Dec, 2015)
Bipartisan support for the science of climate change
Staff quoted: Eric Davidson
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Once upon a time science enjoyed broad bipartisan support. The scare of Sputnik not only inspired American space exploration in the 1950s and 1960s, but also reinforced government commitment to basic research in many disciplines. This paved the way for development of technological applications far beyond the imagination of the original researchers. Current cell phone technology, for example, traces back to research and development for electronics needed to enable the Apollo mission. Today, those cell phones provide a convenience for baby sitters to inform parents that, "Houston, we have a problem." They are also having profound economic impacts that benefit humanity in myriad ways, such as helping rural subsistence farmers in developing countries obtain agricultural extension advice and find the best prices for their produce.


Science Codex (Wed 9 Dec, 2015)
Air pollutions control policies effective in improving downwind air quality
Staff quoted: Mark Castro
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FROSTBURG, MD (December 9, 2015)--Emissions controls on coal-fired power plants are making a difference in reducing exposure of mercury to people, especially in the western Maryland community. A study of air quality from the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science found that levels of mercury in the air from power plant emissions dropped more than half over a 10-year period, coinciding with stricter pollution controls.


Science 2.0 (Wed 9 Dec, 2015)
Air Pollutions Control Policies Effective In Improving Downwind Air Quality
Staff quoted: Mark Castro
Article Link Permanent Link

FROSTBURG, MD (December 9, 2015)--Emissions controls on coal-fired power plants are making a difference in reducing exposure of mercury to people, especially in the western Maryland community. A study of air quality from the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science found that levels of mercury in the air from power plant emissions dropped more than half over a 10-year period, coinciding with stricter pollution controls.


The Register-Guard (Wed 9 Dec, 2015)
The Willamette's B-minus
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The Willamette River got a B-minus grade on its first report card. While the graders appear to be using a somewhat generous curve, efforts to clean up the river are showing results.


Bay Journal (Tue 8 Dec, 2015)
MD oyster farmers call private hatchery a necessity for industry
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In the five years since Maryland's law changed to allow oyster aquaculture throughout the state, dozens of entrepreneurs have taken the plunge. They have built an industry that's raising millions of oysters, creating jobs in waterside communities and helping to filter the Chesapeake Bay's water.


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