UMCES in the Media

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RE News (Wed 5 Nov, 2014)
Listening in on whales, dolphins
Staff quoted: Helen Bailey
Article Link Permanent Link

Researchers will begin a study of marine mammals off the coast of Ocean City, Maryland this fall to help minimize the affects of wind farm development.


The Fishing Wire (Tue 4 Nov, 2014)
Comeback of Susquehanna Flats on Chesapeake Bay
Staff quoted: Mike Kemp, Cassie Gurbisz
Article Link Permanent Link

4-year drought was the 'tipping point' that caused water quality to improve amid years of nutrient reductions.


Capital Gazette (Mon 3 Nov, 2014)
South River grasses a 'story about resilience'
Staff quoted: Don Boesch, Cassie Gurbisz
Article Link Permanent Link

A patch of grasses in the South River is flourishing thanks to more stable, improving water quality credited with the resurgence of crucial bay grasses in the Chesapeake Bay's Susquehanna Flats, scientists say.


Bay Journal (Mon 3 Nov, 2014)
Comeback of Susquehanna Flats grasses hints of sunny future
Staff quoted: Mike Kemp, Cassie Gurbisz
Article Link Permanent Link

In the summer of 2010, Michael Kemp was on a boat in the uppermost part of Chesapeake Bay when, as the tide rolled out, he realized they were floating atop a vast, underwater meadow.


National Resources & Environment (Sat 1 Nov, 2014)
Interview - Dr. Donald Boesch
Staff quoted: Don Boesch
Article Link Permanent Link

Dr. Boesch is a professor of marine science and president of the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, a part of the twelve-institution university system of Maryland.


The Dispatch (Ocean City, MD) (Thu 30 Oct, 2014)
Underwater Mics To Study Turbine Impact
Staff quoted: Helen Bailey
Article Link Permanent Link

OCEAN CITY — After a successful test in the Chesapeake last week, the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science researchers next week will drop microphones off the coast of Ocean City to begin to study the possible short- and long-term effects of the future offshore wind energy farm on marine mammals including whales and dolphins.


Digital Journal (Wed 29 Oct, 2014)
HY-TEK Bio Awarded for Greenhouse Gas Conversion, Business Model
Article Link Permanent Link

Douglas, MA -- (ReleaseWire) -- 10/29/2014 -- Maryland-based start-up HY-TEK Bio LLC has been named 2014 Entrepreneur of the Year by the MD Clean Energy Center for its practical application of mitigating greenhouse gases to oxygen, and its business model that creates an income stream for municipalities using the technology.


WBOC (Salisbury) Television (Wed 29 Oct, 2014)
Horn Point Oyster Hatchery Has Second Best Year on Record Despite Struggles
Staff quoted: Don Meritt
Article Link Permanent Link

CAMBRIDGE, Md.- Another year, another 970 million oysters grown at Horn Point's oyster hatchery.


Mother Nature Network (Tue 28 Oct, 2014)
The disappearing oyster population of Chesapeake Bay: Could 3 million year old fossils hold the key to saving this valuable resource?
Staff quoted: Don Boesch
Article Link Permanent Link

Oysters have long been seen as an inexhaustible resource, harvested throughout the years without concern for consequences. According to Mike Naylor, shellfish program manager at the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, the oyster population in the Chesapeake Bay is now at barely 1 percent of what it had been in the past. This is troublesome because oysters play a critical part in the ecosystem of the Bay, serving as a filtration system and also drawing associated organisms that create a community of filters and filter feeders.


Marine Science Today (Mon 27 Oct, 2014)
How Do Offshore Wind Farms and Marine Life Mix?
Staff quoted: Helen Bailey
Article Link Permanent Link

Offshore windpower is an important source of renewable energy that is becoming a more viable option as technology continues to improve. Wind turbines are now being installed in deeper waters, but researchers know little about the impact this industry will have on the marine environment. A new paper by University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science researcher Helen Bailey and colleagues examines the potential impacts of wind farms on marine life, and provides recommendations for future monitoring.


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