UMCES in the Media

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Thanks to cutting-edge research on today's most pressing environmental problems, we are developing new ideas to help guide our state, nation and world toward a more environmentally sustainable future.

Our researchers are recognized for their ability to explain today’s complex issues in ways that help non-scientists better understand our environment.

To reach an expert, contact Amy Pelsinsky at 410-330-1390 or apelsinsky@umces.edu.

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The Baltimore Sun (Wed 25 Feb, 2015)
Fracking benefits the wealthy few at the expense of the many
Staff quoted: Keith Eshleman, Andrew Elmore
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For months, the mantra of the Western Maryland delegation in Annapolis has been "Restore the highway user fees!"


The Baltimore Business Journal (Wed 25 Feb, 2015)
Charles Monk
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Chair at University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science


The Talbot Spy (Wed 25 Feb, 2015)
Horn Point Researcher Receives Sloan Foundation Fellowship
Staff quoted: Alyson Santoro, Mike Roman, Nick Nidzieko
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The Alfred P. Sloan Foundation in New York announced on February 23rd that Dr. Alyson Santoro, a faculty member of the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, Horn Point Laboratory, is among the winners of the 2015 Sloan Research Fellowships.


The Star Democrat (Wed 25 Feb, 2015)
The Conowingo controversy
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EASTON — Significant things have happened over the past year in regards to the Conowingo Dam.


New Scientist (Wed 25 Feb, 2015)
Did sponge microbiomes help aerate the oceans?
Staff quoted: Fan Zhang
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APPEARANCES apart, they are no spongers. Tiny bacteria living inside sponges seem to be symbiotic and may have played a part in the drama that transformed Earth's deep oceans 750 million years ago. This upheaval turned seas into the oxygen-rich haven for life so familiar to us today.


Terra Daily (Tue 24 Feb, 2015)
Bacteria in marine sponges harvests phosphorus for reef community
Staff quoted: Russell Hill, Fan Zhang
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Did you ever wonder why the water is so clear around coral reefs? Scientists have known for years that sponges can filter water and gather nutrients from the ocean, making it appear crystal clear. For the first time scientists at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science (UMCES) have identified that bacteria on sponges are harvesting phosphorus from the water for the reef ecosystem to use for nourishment. The findings were published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.


UDaily (Tue 24 Feb, 2015)
Climate science in classrooms
Staff quoted: Melissa Rogers
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3:55 p.m., Feb. 24, 2015--The University of Delaware College of Earth, Ocean, and Environment invites local educators to apply for the 2015 Climate Science Academy, hosted by Maryland and Delaware Climate Change Education Assessment and Research (MADE CLEAR).


Science Newsline (Mon 23 Feb, 2015)
Scientists Discover Bacteria in Marine Sponges Harvest Phosphorus for the Reef Community
Staff quoted: Russell Hill, Fan Zhang
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BALTIMORE, MD (February 23, 2015)--Did you ever wonder why the water is so clear around coral reefs? Scientists have known for years that sponges can filter water and gather nutrients from the ocean, making it appear crystal clear. For the first time scientists at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science (UMCES) have identified that bacteria on sponges are harvesting phosphorus from the water for the reef ecosystem to use for nourishment. The findings were published in the February 23 issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.


Physorg (Mon 23 Feb, 2015)
Scientists discover bacteria in marine sponges harvest phosphorus for the reef community
Staff quoted: Russell Hill, Fan Zhang
Article Link Permanent Link

Did you ever wonder why the water is so clear around coral reefs? Scientists have known for years that sponges can filter water and gather nutrients from the ocean, making it appear crystal clear. For the first time scientists at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science (UMCES) have identified that bacteria on sponges are harvesting phosphorus from the water for the reef ecosystem to use for nourishment. The findings were published in the February 23 issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.


Science Daily (Mon 23 Feb, 2015)
Bacteria in marine sponges harvest phosphorus for reef community
Staff quoted: Russell Hill, Fan Zhang
Article Link Permanent Link

Did you ever wonder why the water is so clear around coral reefs? Scientists have known for years that sponges can filter water and gather nutrients from the ocean, making it appear crystal clear. For the first time scientists at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science (UMCES) have identified that bacteria on sponges are harvesting phosphorus from the water for the reef ecosystem to use for nourishment. The findings were published in the February 23 issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.


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