UMCES in the Media

Palmer on Colbert Report

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2nd International Ocean Research Conference (Thu 20 Feb, 2014)
Interview with Mike Roman: "The Barcelona World Race skippers will be scientists out there..."
Staff quoted: Mike Roman
Article Link Permanent Link

It's been almost a decade since the first conference. Do we know much more about the ocean after all these years?


The Yale Forum (Tue 11 Feb, 2014)
Scientist Boesch Emphasizes Ecosystems Management Approaches
Staff quoted: Don Boesch
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Agricultural systems, communities, coastlines and ecosystems management in planning for climate and energy impacts … A Q&A with marine scientist Donald Boesch.


The Star Democrat (Tue 11 Feb, 2014)
Acidic Bay could threaten oysters
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COLLEGE PARK — As the world's oceans get more acidic, Chesapeake Bay oysters could be at risk.


My Eastern Shore (Mon 10 Feb, 2014)
Acidic Chesapeake Bay water could threaten oysters
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COLLEGE PARK — As the world's oceans get more acidic, Chesapeake Bay oysters could be at risk.


Science (Fri 7 Feb, 2014)
The Mountaintop Witness
Staff quoted: Margaret Palmer, Don Boesch
Article Link Permanent Link

Once again, Margaret Palmer was squaring off against a lawyer for a coal company. "I don't mean to pick a fight with you," the attorney said as he cross-examined the academic ecologist, lobbing questions designed to fluster Palmer and raise doubts about her credibility. But even when he suggested her conclusions were shaped by ideology, not data, she remained composed. "Well," she said, "I'll be happy to answer any questions you have about the method."


The Fish Site (Wed 5 Feb, 2014)
Hormone in Crab Eyes Important for Breeding and Development
Staff quoted: J. Sook Chung, Russell Hill
Article Link Permanent Link

US - Those two crooked beady eyes peeking out of a the shell do more than just help blue crabs spot food in the murky waters of the Chesapeake Bay. They also produce important hormones responsible for the growth and development of a crab from an adolescent into a full-fledged adult.


Wired (Tue 4 Feb, 2014)
Hormone in crab eyes helps female store partner's sperm for two years
Staff quoted: J. Sook Chung, Russell Hill
Article Link Permanent Link

A study from the Institute of Marine and Environmental Technology in Maryland has revealed the eyes of female blue crabs contain a hormone that helps the crustacean care for her young and aids the reproduction process.


RedOrbit (Tue 4 Feb, 2014)
Hormone Found In Crab Eyes Help Females Mate And Care For Their Young
Staff quoted: J. Sook Chung, Russell Hill
Article Link Permanent Link

Those two crooked beady eyes peeking out of a the shell do more than just help blue crabs spot food in the murky waters of the Chesapeake Bay. They also produce important hormones responsible for the growth and development of a crab from an adolescent into a full-fledged adult. Scientists at the Institute of Marine and Environmental Technology in Maryland recently discovered a new hormone in those eyestalks responsible for forming body parts that make it possible for female crabs to mate and raise young.


Techie Tonics (Tue 4 Feb, 2014)
Eyestalk Of Female Blue Crabs Produces Sex Hormone
Staff quoted: J. Sook Chung, Russell Hill
Article Link Permanent Link

For many living forms (including humans) eyes have a vital role to play like locating food or prey, keeping an eye on enemies, selecting an ideal place for nesting and so on. But for the blue crabs, eyes have other distinguished role to play. The eyestalks of the blue crab were known to produce hormone, which is responsible for transforming the adolescent crabs to into a healthy and fully-grown adults. Scientists at the Institute of Marine and Environmental Technology in Maryland have revealed the importance of hormone in the crab motherhood. Interestingly scientists have discovered a new hormone that helps female crabs to develop body parts that are required during mating and also help in raising the young ones.


Science Daily (Mon 3 Feb, 2014)
Hormone in crab eyes makes it possible for females to mate, care for their young
Staff quoted: J. Sook Chung, Russell Hill
Article Link Permanent Link

Those two crooked beady eyes peeking out of a the shell do more than just help blue crabs spot food in the murky waters of the Chesapeake Bay. They also produce important hormones responsible for the growth and development of a crab from an adolescent into a full-fledged adult. Scientists at the Institute of Marine and Environmental Technology in Maryland recently discovered a new hormone in those eyestalks responsible for forming body parts that make it possible for female crabs to mate and raise young.


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