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Southern Maryland News (Wed 17 Sep, 2014)
Tidewater to host Stream Study Workshop for Educators
Staff quoted: Lora Harris
Article Link Permanent Link

The Tidewater School, a private Montessori elementary school, will host a Stream Study Workshop for Educators on Saturday, Sept. 20, from 8:30 a.m. to noon at the school's Huntingtown campus.


WOUB Public Media (Wed 17 Sep, 2014)
In 100 Years, Maryland's Crab Cakes Might Be Shrimp Cakes
Staff quoted: Don Boesch
Article Link Permanent Link

For centuries, the Chesapeake Bay has been a natural seafood factory along the East Coast, and that wealth of marine resources has shaped the area's food culture and history—a 2011 Garden & Gun article referred to Maryland crab cakes as "practically a religion." Seafood production also represents a critical portion of the Chesapeake Bay's economic backbone. According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association (NOAA), the commercial seafood industry accounted for $3.39 billion in sales, $890 million in income and almost 34,000 jobs throughout Virginia and Maryland in 2009.


Chesapeake 360 (Wed 17 Sep, 2014)
Travel the Bay with science at the Horn Point Laboratory open house
Staff quoted: Mike Roman, Liz Freedlander
Article Link Permanent Link

CAMBRIDGE — The Horn Point Laboratory invites the public to take part in its annual free open house Saturday, Oct. 11.


Smithsonian Magazine (Tue 16 Sep, 2014)
In 100 Years, Maryland's Crab Cakes Might Be Shrimp Cakes
Staff quoted: Don Boesch
Article Link Permanent Link

For centuries, the Chesapeake Bay has been a natural seafood factory along the East Coast, and that wealth of marine resources has shaped the area's food culture and history—a 2011 Garden & Gun article referred to Maryland crab cakes as "practically a religion." Seafood production also represents a critical portion of the Chesapeake Bay's economic backbone. According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association (NOAA), the commercial seafood industry accounted for $3.39 billion in sales, $890 million in income and almost 34,000 jobs throughout Virginia and Maryland in 2009.


CBS Baltimore (Tue 16 Sep, 2014)
Maryland At High Risk As Sea Levels Continue To Rise
Staff quoted: Don Boesch
Article Link Permanent Link

BALTIMORE (WJZ)—A graphic warning for a vulnerable Maryland: the danger is sea level rise coupled with storm surges.


Biomass Magazine (Tue 16 Sep, 2014)
MIPS funds 5 poultry manure-to-energy projects
Staff quoted: Feng Chen
Article Link Permanent Link

The Maryland Industrial Partnerships Program has approved research projects worth $4.7 million to 18 teams, including five projects worth $1.9 million that aim to convert poultry manure into energy. The program is an initiative of the Maryland Technology Enterprise Institute in the A. James Clark School of Engineering at the University of Maryland. For this round of funding, companies are contributing $2.4 million to the jointly funded projects and MIPS is contributing $2.3.


WVTF Radio (Mon 15 Sep, 2014)
Climate Change & the Chesapeake Bay
Staff quoted: Tom Miller
Article Link Permanent Link

Next week the U.N. will bring experts from around the world for a climate change summit in New York. On the Chesapeake Bay scientists are looking at what a warmer bay might mean for species like the blue crab and striped bass.


Environmental Monitor (Mon 15 Sep, 2014)
On the Susquehanna Flats, scientists study stability of once-vanquished Chesapeake seagrass beds
Staff quoted: Cassie Gurbusz
Article Link Permanent Link

Stretching nearly 20 square miles along the bottom of the Chesapeake Bay, the Susquehanna Flats are a prized spot among New England anglers. The thick grasses lining this underwater prairie provide shelter and sustenance for many aquatic species, and help filter water flowing into the Bay.


The Globe and Mail (Canada) (Sun 14 Sep, 2014)
Aboard the Amundsen: Ship's scientists probe the future of Western Arctic
Staff quoted: Lee Cooper
Article Link Permanent Link

It's 1 a.m. and the Beaufort Sea is frigid and dark. But on the Amundsen, a Canadian Coast Guard ship turned floating laboratory, work doesn't stop for the night.


The Star Democrat (Fri 12 Sep, 2014)
Work at Poplar Island getting attention
Article Link Permanent Link

POPLAR ISLAND — The work underway at Poplar Island in the Chesapeake Bay has gained international recognition, with people coming from all over the world to see how it's being done and take that technology back to their own countries.


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