UMCES in the Media

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Science Newsline (Mon 3 Feb, 2014)
Hormone in Crab Eyes Makes It Possible for Females to Mate And Care for Their Young
Staff quoted: J. Sook Chung, Russell Hill
Article Link Permanent Link

BALTIMORE, MD (February 3, 2014) –Those two crooked beady eyes peeking out of a the shell do more than just help blue crabs spot food in the murky waters of the Chesapeake Bay. They also produce important hormones responsible for the growth and development of a crab from an adolescent into a full-fledged adult. Scientists at the Institute of Marine and Environmental Technology in Maryland recently discovered a new hormone in those eyestalks responsible for forming body parts that make it possible for female crabs to mate and raise young.


Physorg (Mon 3 Feb, 2014)
Hormone in crab eyes makes it possible for females to mate and care for their young
Staff quoted: J. Sook Chung, Russell Hill
Article Link Permanent Link

Scientists discover new hormone in the eyestalks of blue crabs responsible for forming body parts that make it possible for female crabs to mate and raise young.


E! Science News (Mon 3 Feb, 2014)
Hormone in crab eyes makes it possible for females to mate and care for their young
Article Link Permanent Link

Scientists discover new hormone in the eyestalks of blue crabs responsible for forming body parts that make it possible for female crabs to mate and raise young.


Nature World News (Mon 3 Feb, 2014)
Sex Hormone in Crabs' Eyes Produces Body Parts Essential for Reproduction
Staff quoted: J. Sook Chung, Russell Hill
Article Link Permanent Link

Female blue crab's eyes play a role in growing body parts that enable the crabs to mate and reproduce, according to researchers at the University of Maryland's Institute of Marine and Environmental Technology (IMET).


My Eastern Shore (Fri 24 Jan, 2014)
AAUW awards 2013 grants
Staff quoted: Jacqueline Tay, Dale Booth
Article Link Permanent Link

EASTON — The Easton Branch of the American Association of University Women recently named the four recipients of the 2013 Mature Woman's Grant. The purpose of this grant is to assist women who are returning to complete their college education, pursuing further graduate studies or applying for a certificate program to enter a new career path and would benefit from some extra financial assistance in accomplishing this goal. This is the ninth year that grants have been awarded to women who are residents of Caroline, Dorchester, Kent, Queen Anne's or Talbot counties, and are more than 25 years of age.


Southern Maryland News (Fri 24 Jan, 2014)
League of Women Voters hosting public forum on Dominion's proposed LNG export project
Staff quoted: Tom Miller
Article Link Permanent Link

Residents and others interested in the proposed Dominion Cove Point Liquefied Natural Gas exportation project will be able to hear from several of the project's stakeholders, including a Dominion representative, an environmental steward and a gas industry expert, among others, during a forum next week.


Bay Journal (Tue 21 Jan, 2014)
Living shoreline summit highlights emerging science, practices
Staff quoted: Evamaria Koch
Article Link Permanent Link

"We are on a journey through the unknown," said Evamaria Koch, a Brazilian-born scientist, who came to Maryland for her doctoral work and became captivated by the Chesapeake's shorelines and submerged aquatic vegetation.


Southern Maryland News (Wed 15 Jan, 2014)
Demolition, construction to begin soon at Chesapeake Biological Lab
Staff quoted: Thomas Miller
Article Link Permanent Link

Solomons residents received updates Monday on two projects nearly a year in the making at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science Chesapeake Biological Lab campus.


The Houston Chronicle (Sat 11 Jan, 2014)
February report could lead to seismic study, Atlantic drilling
Staff quoted: Don Boesch
Article Link Permanent Link

WASHINGTON - Marking a significant step toward eventual oil drilling off the East Coast, the Interior Department is set to publish a final assessment of the environmental effects of a new generation of seismic research in U.S. Atlantic waters.


Fuel Fix (Fri 10 Jan, 2014)
Feds promise report next month on effects of Atlantic seismic testing
Staff quoted: Don Boesch
Article Link Permanent Link

WASHINGTON — Marking a significant step toward eventual oil drilling off the East Coast, the Interior Department is set to publish a final assessment of the environmental effects of a new generation of seismic research in U.S. Atlantic waters.


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