UMCES in the Media

Palmer on Colbert Report

Thanks to cutting-edge research on today's most pressing environmental problems, we are developing new ideas to help guide our state, nation and world toward a more environmentally sustainable future.

Our researchers are recognized for their ability to explain today’s complex issues in ways that help non-scientists better understand our environment.

To reach an expert, contact Amy Pelsinsky at 410-330-1389 or apelsinsky@umces.edu.

Search our press archive by title, subject, periodical, or faculty quoted.

Subscribe to the UMCES in the Media RSS Feed to receive articles as they are published.

Select Year & Month

Enter Search Term / Choose UMCES Laboratory



Search Results
You are browsing 2890 articles from the database of 2890 articles. You can browse/search by year/month, search terms and UMCES laboratory to view other articles.


[1]      «      4   |   5   |   6   |   7   |   8   |   9   |   10      »      [289]

PolitickerNJ (Fri 10 Jan, 2014)
Pallone Fights Back Against Efforts to Expand Seismic Testing and Offshore Drilling Into Atlantic Ocean
Staff quoted: Don Boesch
Article Link Permanent Link

WASHINGTON, D.C.—Today, Congressman Frank Pallone, Jr. (NJ-06) continued his push against oil and gas exploration in the Atlantic at a hearing in the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources.


The Washington Examiner (Fri 10 Jan, 2014)
Lawmakers spar over seismic testing for Atlantic Ocean drilling
Staff quoted: Don Boesch
Article Link Permanent Link

A long-awaited final federal study on the environmental impact of using seismic guns to search for oil and gas deposits off the Atlantic coast is due at the end of February, signaling future battles between Republicans and Democrats regarding offshore drilling.


Southern Maryland News (Fri 3 Jan, 2014)
Maryland cracks down on oyster poaching
Staff quoted: Don Meritt
Article Link Permanent Link

The Maryland Department of Natural Resources and State Police hope new technology and harsher penalties will help crack down on illegal oyster harvesting in the Chesapeake Bay.


Science Magazine (Fri 3 Jan, 2014)
Endocrinology: It's in Her Eyes
Staff quoted: J. Sook Chung
Article Link Permanent Link

Crustaceans go through pubertal molt to provide the animal with features that are distinct to adults. The androgenic gland hormone (AGH) is important for male differentiation and secondary male characteristics. Females lack AGH, so are considered the default sex for development. Previous work has shown that when the eyestalk is ablated in the females of some crab species, mating and maternal care structures show defects; however, the animals are able to molt and develop into giant immature crabs. In studying the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus, Zmora et al. now show that the endocrine system and localized activity of a hormone termed crustacean female sex hormone (CFSH) from the eyestalk ganglia are involved in adult-specific development through the control of the pubertal-terminal molt. When CFSH is eliminated, the brooding features, which are important for mating and brooding large clutches, are abnormal. This work shows that the endrocrine system functions via a female-specific hormone for the development of adult morphological structures associated with female reproduction, i.e., for mating and brooding. — BAP


Capital News Service (Thu 2 Jan, 2014)
Maryland using technology to crack down on oyster poaching
Staff quoted: Don Meritt
Article Link Permanent Link

The Maryland Natural Resources Police are relying on new technology and harsher penalties to help crack down on illegal oyster harvesting in the Chesapeake Bay.


Bay Journal (Wed 1 Jan, 2014)
Air regs have helped water quality more than previously thought: Nitrate concentrations in 9 forested watersheds decreased between 31.9 percent and 72.6 percent
Staff quoted: Keith Eshleman, Robert Sabo, Katie Kline
Article Link Permanent Link

The Chesapeake Bay may have reaped greater benefits from air pollution reductions over the last two decades than previously estimated, new research suggests.


National Fisherman (Wed 1 Jan, 2014)
Holidays spur Md. crackdown on oyster poaching
Staff quoted: Don Meritt
Article Link Permanent Link

The weeks leading to the holidays tend to be the most active for oyster poachers in the Chesapeake Bay, but the Maryland Department of Natural Resources and state police were hoping in recent days that new technology and harsher penalties would help them crack down on illegal oyster harvesting. Poaching includes harvesting undersized oysters, exceeding bushel limits or harvesting in areas designated as sanctuaries, said Natural Resources Police Capt. David Larsen said. Mostly due to overharvesting and disease, "currently less than 1 percent of historic levels of oysters exist in the bay," said Sarah Widman, a Department of Natural Resources Fishery spokeswoman. Poaching undermines attempts to restore oyster populations and compromises researchers' ability to gather data.


Endocrinology (Wed 1 Jan, 2014)
A New Hormone Negates a Default Principle
Staff quoted: Sook Chung
Article Link Permanent Link

Most multicellular organisms reproduce sexually. Where male and female functions are in separate individuals, as in nearly all vertebrates, male and female anatomies diverge at some point during development. In species with parental care of eggs or young, sex-typical anatomy sometimes includes special structures for egg brooding or provisioning of young, as is the case for pregnancy pouches of male seahorses or crop milk in pigeons. Finding the mechanisms responsible for the development of sex differences in sexual and parental anatomy is a classic problem in reproductive endocrinology. Much research points to an important distinction between sex-typical characters that are established early in development, well before sexual maturity, such as the scrotum of many male mammals, and those that arise at sexual maturity, such as human female breasts. Combinations are also possible, in which the structure undergoes sexual differentiation early and then later on is enlarged by the hormonal changes of sexual maturity, such as the uterus of female mammals.


Fishery Nation (Tue 31 Dec, 2013)
Holiday season is time to crack down on oyster poaching in Chesapeake Bay
Staff quoted: Don Meritt
Article Link Permanent Link

The weeks leading to the holidays tend to be the most active for oyster poachers in the Chesapeake Bay, but the Maryland Department of Natural Resources and state police were hoping in recent days that new technology and harsher penalties would help them crack down on illegal oyster harvesting. Read more@baltimoresun


The Baltimore Sun (Mon 30 Dec, 2013)
Holiday season is time to crack down on oyster poaching in Chesapeake Bay
Staff quoted: Don Meritt
Article Link Permanent Link

The weeks leading to the holidays tend to be the most active for oyster poachers in the Chesapeake Bay, but the Maryland Department of Natural Resources and state police were hoping in recent days that new technology and harsher penalties would help them crack down on illegal oyster harvesting.


[1]      «      4   |   5   |   6   |   7   |   8   |   9   |   10      »      [289]