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Staff Articles
You are browsing all 10 articles featuring J. Sook Chung. You can browse/search by year/month, and search terms to view other articles in the database.



The Fish Site (Wed 5 Feb, 2014)
Hormone in Crab Eyes Important for Breeding and Development
Staff quoted: J. Sook Chung, Russell Hill
Article Link Permanent Link

US - Those two crooked beady eyes peeking out of a the shell do more than just help blue crabs spot food in the murky waters of the Chesapeake Bay. They also produce important hormones responsible for the growth and development of a crab from an adolescent into a full-fledged adult.


Wired (Tue 4 Feb, 2014)
Hormone in crab eyes helps female store partner's sperm for two years
Staff quoted: J. Sook Chung, Russell Hill
Article Link Permanent Link

A study from the Institute of Marine and Environmental Technology in Maryland has revealed the eyes of female blue crabs contain a hormone that helps the crustacean care for her young and aids the reproduction process.


RedOrbit (Tue 4 Feb, 2014)
Hormone Found In Crab Eyes Help Females Mate And Care For Their Young
Staff quoted: J. Sook Chung, Russell Hill
Article Link Permanent Link

Those two crooked beady eyes peeking out of a the shell do more than just help blue crabs spot food in the murky waters of the Chesapeake Bay. They also produce important hormones responsible for the growth and development of a crab from an adolescent into a full-fledged adult. Scientists at the Institute of Marine and Environmental Technology in Maryland recently discovered a new hormone in those eyestalks responsible for forming body parts that make it possible for female crabs to mate and raise young.


Techie Tonics (Tue 4 Feb, 2014)
Eyestalk Of Female Blue Crabs Produces Sex Hormone
Staff quoted: J. Sook Chung, Russell Hill
Article Link Permanent Link

For many living forms (including humans) eyes have a vital role to play like locating food or prey, keeping an eye on enemies, selecting an ideal place for nesting and so on. But for the blue crabs, eyes have other distinguished role to play. The eyestalks of the blue crab were known to produce hormone, which is responsible for transforming the adolescent crabs to into a healthy and fully-grown adults. Scientists at the Institute of Marine and Environmental Technology in Maryland have revealed the importance of hormone in the crab motherhood. Interestingly scientists have discovered a new hormone that helps female crabs to develop body parts that are required during mating and also help in raising the young ones.


Science Daily (Mon 3 Feb, 2014)
Hormone in crab eyes makes it possible for females to mate, care for their young
Staff quoted: J. Sook Chung, Russell Hill
Article Link Permanent Link

Those two crooked beady eyes peeking out of a the shell do more than just help blue crabs spot food in the murky waters of the Chesapeake Bay. They also produce important hormones responsible for the growth and development of a crab from an adolescent into a full-fledged adult. Scientists at the Institute of Marine and Environmental Technology in Maryland recently discovered a new hormone in those eyestalks responsible for forming body parts that make it possible for female crabs to mate and raise young.


Science Newsline (Mon 3 Feb, 2014)
Hormone in Crab Eyes Makes It Possible for Females to Mate And Care for Their Young
Staff quoted: J. Sook Chung, Russell Hill
Article Link Permanent Link

BALTIMORE, MD (February 3, 2014) –Those two crooked beady eyes peeking out of a the shell do more than just help blue crabs spot food in the murky waters of the Chesapeake Bay. They also produce important hormones responsible for the growth and development of a crab from an adolescent into a full-fledged adult. Scientists at the Institute of Marine and Environmental Technology in Maryland recently discovered a new hormone in those eyestalks responsible for forming body parts that make it possible for female crabs to mate and raise young.


Physorg (Mon 3 Feb, 2014)
Hormone in crab eyes makes it possible for females to mate and care for their young
Staff quoted: J. Sook Chung, Russell Hill
Article Link Permanent Link

Scientists discover new hormone in the eyestalks of blue crabs responsible for forming body parts that make it possible for female crabs to mate and raise young.


Nature World News (Mon 3 Feb, 2014)
Sex Hormone in Crabs' Eyes Produces Body Parts Essential for Reproduction
Staff quoted: J. Sook Chung, Russell Hill
Article Link Permanent Link

Female blue crab's eyes play a role in growing body parts that enable the crabs to mate and reproduce, according to researchers at the University of Maryland's Institute of Marine and Environmental Technology (IMET).


Science Magazine (Fri 3 Jan, 2014)
Endocrinology: It's in Her Eyes
Staff quoted: J. Sook Chung
Article Link Permanent Link

Crustaceans go through pubertal molt to provide the animal with features that are distinct to adults. The androgenic gland hormone (AGH) is important for male differentiation and secondary male characteristics. Females lack AGH, so are considered the default sex for development. Previous work has shown that when the eyestalk is ablated in the females of some crab species, mating and maternal care structures show defects; however, the animals are able to molt and develop into giant immature crabs. In studying the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus, Zmora et al. now show that the endocrine system and localized activity of a hormone termed crustacean female sex hormone (CFSH) from the eyestalk ganglia are involved in adult-specific development through the control of the pubertal-terminal molt. When CFSH is eliminated, the brooding features, which are important for mating and brooding large clutches, are abnormal. This work shows that the endrocrine system functions via a female-specific hormone for the development of adult morphological structures associated with female reproduction, i.e., for mating and brooding. — BAP


International Aquafeed (Thu 1 Mar, 2012)
Aquaculture Research Center at the Institute of Marine and Environmental Science
Staff quoted: Eric Schott, Allen Place, Aaron Watson, J. Sook Chung, Russell Hill,
Article Link Permanent Link

The Aquaculture Research Center (ARC) at the Institute of Marine and Environmental Technology (IMET) in Baltimore, Maryland, is one of the world's leaders in sustainable aquaculture research. A unique partnership between the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science (UMCES), University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC) and University of Maryland Baltimore (UMB), IMET takes a molecular approach to study reproduction, genetics, early development, nutrition, growth and disease in selected marine and estuarine high-value finfish and shellfish. This research is applied to the development of novel strategies to improve yields and sustainability of local and global marine aquaculture, fisheries, and ecosystems.