May 12, 2015

Hire me, I’m a Scientist! Career challenges for students

Detbra Rosales, Melanie Jackson, Chih-Hsien (Michelle) Lin To go to grad school or not go to grad school that is the question”, every student has at some point of his or her life. Is graduate school required to get you that dream job in marine science or any science in general? This all depends on […]

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May 10, 2015

Science for Environmental Management 2015 poem

Fifteen students from four campuses met each week After watching YouTube lectures and reading a lot Our class time flew by, did it not Facilitators led the discussion, insights they did seek.   And the rapporteur provided the discussion summary So that the author could draft up a synthesis blog Clarifying the topic by avoiding […]

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May 5, 2015

The future of managing fisheries: what can we expect?

Adriane Michaelis, Sabrina Klick, and Rebecca Peters As students in the Science for Environmental Management course offered by the University of Maryland, we had the opportunity to discuss past, current, and future aspects of science and fisheries management with Dr. Mike Wilberg of the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science and Eric Schwaab, Chief […]

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May 1, 2015

Fifteen students, Ten minutes: One humbling education

Rebecca Peters, Aimee Hoover, Emily Russ The birds are chirping, the grass is green, the tourists are out walking the streets, and students are indoors on a Saturday signaling the coming end of another eventful school year: Spring is in the air in Annapolis. On Saturday April 25, 2015 graduate students in the Science for […]

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April 28, 2015

A report card to tell your mom about: Environmental report cards provide transparent assessments of our aquatic ecosystems

Melanie Jackson, Chih-Hsien (Michelle) Lin, Detbra Rosales Students in grammar school and all the way to college have anxiety about receiving report cards, and often times devise plans for the best time to tell their parents about their not so stellar grades. Explaining poor grades to parents can involve tactics such as blaming the teacher […]

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April 23, 2015

Willamette River Report Card – I can see the light at the end of the tunnel

Developing a new report card is not a trivial business and can take a lot of time and effort on everyone’s behalf. The Willamette River Report Card has been no exception with over eight months since start date and upwards of 20 indicators initially proposed by stakeholders from 25 organizations at four workshops. Despite information […]

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April 21, 2015

Scientists in Media: “Give me a microphone, and I shall waken the world”

Wenfei Ni, Martina Gonzalez Mateu, Stephanie Siemek Taking a last glance of the materials on the table, Rona Kobell from the Bay Journal adjusted her glasses, and asked clearly, “Why is anyone still fishing in the Anacostia River anyway if it is very polluted? “It is because lots of urban families nearby just go fishing […]

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April 17, 2015

Developing a constitution for Chesapeake Bay

At a recent roundtable discussion of approaches for accelerating Chesapeake Bay restoration, one of the participants used the phrase “We the people…” which provoked me to think of the preamble to the United States Constitution, the beginning of an amazingly robust document that still resonates today. I hope that the 2014 Chesapeake Bay and Watershed […]

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April 14, 2015

Do’s and Don’ts: How scientists and the law can exist in tandem

Fan Zhang, Emily Russ, Whitney Hoot When we talk about scientists, we envision someone wearing a lab coat and exploring nature’s mysteries, a professor passing knowledge to the next generation or a group of people who enjoy debating and discussing abstruse topics. We know that these are important professional activities for scientists, in academia and […]

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April 10, 2015

In memory of Jay Zieman, University of Virginia seagrass ecologist

Joseph “Jay” C. Zieman (1943-2015), my seagrass ecology colleague, died recently. I first met Jay in Biloxi, Mississippi in 1980 when my Master’s thesis advisor C. Peter McRoy organized a workshop associated with the Seagrass Ecosystem Study, funded by the National Science Foundation as part of the International Decade of Ocean Exploration. Jay was one […]

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