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Seagrass and sediment nutrients: Species comparison and fertilisation responses of P. australis at Rottnest Island, Western Australia (Page 1)

Seagrass and sediment nutrients: Species comparison and fertilisation responses of P. australis at Rottnest Island, Western Australia

Udy JW and Dennison WC ·
1999

Seagrasses, marine angiospenns with high rates of primacy productivity, are often hmned by the supply of nutrients or light. We investigated the ambient sedirncnt nutrient availability, biornass, growth and physiological characteristics of five seagrass species common around Rottnest lsland (P. australis, P. sinuosa, A. antarctica, A. griffithii and H. ovalis).

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Seagrass survival during pulsed turbidity events: the effects of light deprivation on the seagrasses Halodule pinifolia and Halophila ovalis (Page 1)

Seagrass survival during pulsed turbidity events: the effects of light deprivation on the seagrasses Halodule pinifolia and Halophila ovalis

Longstaff BJ and Dennison WC ·
1999

Pulsed turbidity events caused by factors such as flooding rivers have the potential to seriously impact seagrass communities by depriving the plants of all available light. The effects of light deprivation was investigated on the survival, morphology and physiology of the tropical seagrasses Halodule pinifolia and Halophila ovalis growing in the South-East Gulf of Carpentaria, Australia, a region where pulsed flood events are common.

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Sensitivity of transects across a depth gradient to measuring changes in aerial coverage and abundance of Ruppia megacarpa Mason (Page 1)

Sensitivity of transects across a depth gradient to measuring changes in aerial coverage and abundance of Ruppia megacarpa Mason

Carruthers TJB and Walker DI ·
1999

Effective management of estuarine systems that contain submerged aquatic macrophytes, requires knowledge of whether macrophyte populations are stable, increasing or decreasing in terms of aerial coverage and abundance. This study established three transects within Wilson Inlet and monitored them five times during 1996 for percent cover of Ruppia megacarpa and maximum depth limits of these meadows.

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Sydney rock oyster, Saccostrea commercialis (Iredale & Roughley), filtration of shrimp farm effluent: the effects on water quality (Page 1)

Sydney rock oyster, Saccostrea commercialis (Iredale & Roughley), filtration of shrimp farm effluent: the effects on water quality

Jones AB and Preston NP ·
1999

Shrimp pond effluent water can contain higher concentrations of dissolved nutrients and suspended particulates than the influent water. Consequently, there are concerns about adverse environmental impacts on coastal waters caused by eutrophication and increased turbidity. One potential method of improving effluent water quality prior to discharge or recirculation is to use bivalves to filter the effluent.

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Temperature, salinity and food effects on asexual reproduction and abundance of the scyphozoan Chrysaora quinquecirrha

Purcell JE, White JR, Nemazie DA, and Wright DA ·
1999

Outbreaks of jellyfish are reported worldwide, yet the environmental factors that control the sizes of jellyfish populations are not well understood. The scyphomedusan Chrysaora quinquecirrha occurs in the mesohaline portion of Chesapeake Bay each summer. Population sizes of the medusae show dramatic annual variations that are correlated with salinity and temperature.

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Within canopy growth strategies of the two seagrass species Amphibolis griffithii (J. Black) den Hartog and Amphibolis antarctica (Labillardiere) Sonder & Ascherson ex Ascherson (Page 1)

Within canopy growth strategies of the two seagrass species Amphibolis griffithii (J. Black) den Hartog and Amphibolis antarctica (Labillardiere) Sonder & Ascherson ex Ascherson

Carruthers TJB ·
1999

Responses in leaf production to variation in light climate throughout Amphibolis griffithii and A.antarctica canopies were studied at Rottnest Island, Western Australia. To test the importance of small scale changes in the physical environment (e.g. light, temperature and water movement) within the canopy, leaf production rates at different heights within the canopies and Radiation Use Efficiency (RUE), for the entire canopy of each species, were calculated and compared.

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