Front view illustration of an Aweoweo, endemic to the Hawaiian islands. Native water and land birds (e.g., Nihoa finch), and seabirds use Aweoweo for food, nesting material or nesting sites. Early Hawaiians used the wood to form shark hooks (makau mano) fitted with bone points. Aweoweo leaves and shoots were wrapped in ti leaves, cooked and eaten in times of food scarcity by early Hawaiians.

Chenopodium oahuense (Aweoweo)

Front view illustration of an Aweoweo, endemic to the Hawaiian islands. Native water and land birds (e.g., Nihoa finch), and seabirds use Aweoweo for food, nesting material or nesting sites. Early Hawaiians used the wood to form shark hooks (makau mano) fitted with bone points. Aweoweo leaves and shoots were wrapped in ti leaves, cooked and eaten in times of food scarcity by early Hawaiians.

tree flora aweoweo alaweo alaweo huna aheahea ahea ahewahewa kahaihai native Angiosperms Eudicots Core eudicots Caryophyllales Amaranthaceae Chenopodioideae Chenopodium oahuense

Author(s)Jane Hawkey
Author CompanyIntegration and Application Network
Date Created2010-01-01
AlbumFlora > Trees/Shrubs/Vines
TypeSymbol
Project(s)Pacific Island Network science communication products
Dimensions261 x 502
Filesize106 kB (svg)   58 kB (png)
Number of Downloads183
Filetype(s) SVG     PNG
LicenseAttribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International (CC BY-SA 4.0)
Required AttributionJane Hawkey, Integration and Application Network (ian.umces.edu/media-library)