Best Management Practices: Preserving clean water in a changing climate (Page 1)  
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Best Management Practices: Preserving clean water in a changing climate

Risk management is critical in any restoration project. Risks include those associated with climate patterns, such as more intense storms, as well as those associated with land use change, site selection, and design. Addressing these risks in conjunction with ongoing restoration efforts will prepare communities for greater variability and may result in cost savings and reduced risk. Best Management Practices (BMPs) should be sited and designed with climate change impacts in mind. Incorporating climate change considerations into your project design will not require a wholesale change in implementation in most cases. Evaluating your project for its climate vulnerabilities and developing a range of strategies at the initial planning stage will increase effectiveness, decrease maintenance costs, and help to ensure you are meeting the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Total Maximum Daily Load requirements into the future.

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IAN Author(s)Marcus Griswold, Caroline Donovan
PublisherMaryland Department of Natural Resources and the Integration and Application Network
Date Published2013-07-22
TypeNewsletter
ProjectCoordination support for adapting to climate change
Location(s)Baltimore Harbor
Chesapeake Bay
Chester River
Choptank River
Lower Eastern Shore (Tangier)
Lower Western Shore (MD)
Magothy River
Mid Bay
Nanticoke River
Patapsco and Back Rivers
Patuxent River
Potomac River
Sassafras River
Severn River
South River
Tangier and Pocomoke Sounds
Upper Bay
Upper Eastern Shore
Upper Western Shore
West and Rhode Rivers
Wye River
Number of Pages4
Filesize1 MB
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