Publications about Potomac River
Upper Potomac Headwaters Report Card 2015 (Page 1)

Upper Potomac Headwaters Report Card 2015

Bill Dennison, Suzanne Spitzer, Vanessa Vargas-Nguyen, Jane Hawkey ·
10 December 2015

This report card was produced in December 2015 by The University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science and represents a joint effort of graduate students and faculty in the Marine Estuarine Environmental Sciences program at the Appalachian Laboratory in Frostburg and the Integration and Application Network. The report card provides an assessment of stream health in the Upper Potomac Headwaters region upstream of Harpers Ferry, West Virginia.


Read more

Greenhouse Gas Reduction Plan: Chapter 8 Adaptation (Page 1)

Greenhouse Gas Reduction Plan: Chapter 8 Adaptation

Caroline Donovan, Marcus Griswold ·
24 July 2013

Climate change will affect Maryland in a variety of ways. More obvious impacts could include an increased risk for extreme events such as drought, storms, flooding, and forest fires; more heat-related stress; the spread of existing or new vector-born disease; and increased erosion and inundation of low-lying areas along the State’s shoreline and coast. Adaptation, together with mitigation, is necessary to address climate change.


Read more

Resiliency and water resources management: Water supply in a changing climate (Page 1)

Resiliency and water resources management: Water supply in a changing climate

Marcus Griswold, Caroline Donovan ·
23 July 2013

Maryland citizens are blessed with an abundant supply of water. However, many water systems are already stressed during droughts, and infrastructure damage and water contamination occurs during floods. Future population growth will combine with increasingly variable weather patterns to place more communities at risk of property damage, regulatory liabilities and uncertain access to drinking water.


Read more

Best Management Practices: Preserving clean water in a changing climate (Page 1)

Best Management Practices: Preserving clean water in a changing climate

Marcus Griswold, Caroline Donovan ·
22 July 2013

Risk management is critical in any restoration project. Risks include those associated with climate patterns, such as more intense storms, as well as those associated with land use change, site selection, and design. Addressing these risks in conjunction with ongoing restoration efforts will prepare communities for greater variability and may result in cost savings and reduced risk. Best Management Practices (BMPs) should be sited and designed with climate change impacts in mind.


Read more

Watershed Management: Conservation in a changing climate (Page 1)

Watershed Management: Conservation in a changing climate

Marcus Griswold, Caroline Donovan ·
12 July 2013

Maryland’s extensive aquatic ecosystems range from freshwater swamps and bogs to freshwater rivers and marshes to coastal bays and salt marshes. These ecosystems are influenced by precipitation, temperature, tropical storms, and human activity. Human development and pollution have degraded their natural resilience, leaving them more vulnerable to climate change and extreme events.


Read more

2012 Chesapeake Bay Report Card (Page 1)

2012 Chesapeake Bay Report Card

Caroline Donovan, Bill Dennison, Heath Kelsey, Alexandra Fries ·
3 July 2013

This report card provides a transparent, timely, and geographically detailed assessment of Chesapeake Bay. In 2012, the methods for the report card have changed to include five water quality indicators and two biotic indicators. In 2012, the overall grade for Chesapeake Bay is a 47%, a C. This means the Bay is in moderate health. Fisheries indicators as well as trajectories of reporting region health are also presented. For further details, visit the Report Card website .


Read more

Potential Stream Density in Mid-Atlantic US Watersheds (Page 1)

Potential Stream Density in Mid-Atlantic US Watersheds

Elmore AJ, Julian JP, Guinn SM, and Fitzpatrick MC ·
2013

Stream network density exerts a strong influence on ecohydrologic processes in watersheds, yet existing stream maps fail to capture most headwater streams and therefore underestimate stream density. Furthermore, discrepancies between mapped and actual stream length vary between watersheds, confounding efforts to understand the impacts of land use on stream ecosystems.


Read more

2011 Chesapeake Bay Report Card (Page 1)

2011 Chesapeake Bay Report Card

Bill Dennison, Caroline Donovan, Jonathan Kellogg, Alexandra Fries ·
17 April 2012

This report card provides a transparent, timely, and geographically detailed assessment of Chesapeake Bay. The overall health of Chesapeake Bay, determined using water quality and biotic indicators, declined slightly in 2011. The overall grade of D+ was a decrease for the second year in a row, down from a C- in 2010. Only two reporting regions, the Patapsco and Back Rivers, and the Lower Western Shore (MD), had improved grades in 2011.


Read more

Channel head locations in forested watersheds across the mid-Atlantic United States: A physiographic analysis

Julian JP, Elmore AJ, and Guinn SM ·
2012

Channel heads are the beginning of river networks and thus knowing their location is important in assessing water resources and health threats to fluvial ecosystems. Despite their importance, most channel heads are unmapped. Remote sensing technologies have not yet proven effective under forested canopies, suggesting that predictive models of channel head locations are the best solution to the impracticality of field-mapping the millions of these features that exist in the U.S. alone.


Read more

Chesapeake Bay Report Card 2010 (Page 1)

Chesapeake Bay Report Card 2010

Bill Dennison, Heath Kelsey, Caroline Donovan, Sara Powell ·
27 April 2011

This report card provides a transparent, timely, and geographically detailed assessment of 2010 Chesapeake Bay health. The overall health of Chesapeake Bay, assessed using water quality and biotic indicators, declined slightly in 2010. The overall grade decreased from a C in 2009 to C- in 2010. Only two reporting regions (James River and York River) had improved grades in 2010, three were unchanged, and nine declined.


Read more