Publications about Northeast

IAN is committed to producing practical, user-centered communications that foster a better understanding of science and enable readers to pursue new opportunities in research, education, and environmental problem-solving. Our publications synthesize scientific findings using effective science communication techniques.

Ecological Drought in the Northeast United States (Page 1)

Ecological Drought in the Northeast United States

Brianne Walsh, Simon Costanzo, Bill Dennison ·
28 September 2016

The Department of the Interior Climate Science Centers (CSCs) and their managing organization, the National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center at the U.S. Geological Survey, have chosen the emerging climate science field of Ecological Drought as a research focus area. This newsletter highlights the outcomes of a two-day workshop held in Amherst, Massachusetts, as part of a series of meetings at each of the nation’s eight CSCs.

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The changing North Woods and moose (Page 1)

The changing North Woods and moose

Brianne Walsh, Simon Costanzo ·
10 March 2015

A scenario planning exercise focused on climate change, land use, and moose in the Northeast U.S. is being undertaken by the Wildlife Conservation Society, North Atlantic Landscape Conservation Cooperative, Northeast Climate Science Center (U.S. Geological Survey), and the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science. Phase 1 of the scenario planning process involves the identification of key features and drivers within the focus system.

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Climate change, the boreal forest, and moose: Scenario planning to inform land and wildlife management (Page 1)

Climate change, the boreal forest, and moose: Scenario planning to inform land and wildlife management

Brianne Walsh, Simon Costanzo, Bill Dennison ·
4 February 2015

While moose have documented thermal tolerances and habitat requirements, uncertainties remain regarding the pathways through which climate change might affect the species and the nature and timing of its response, presenting an opportunity to proactively consider the implications for the management and conservation of this species into the future from a multi-state perspective.

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Detecting open vegetation in a forested landscape: pollen and remote sensing data from New England, USA (Page 1)

Detecting open vegetation in a forested landscape: pollen and remote sensing data from New England, USA

McLauchlan KK, Elmore AJ, Oswald WW, and Sugita S ·
2007

The proportional cover of forest and grassland vegetation, known as landscape openness, has been particularly difficult to reconstruct because of differences in pollen productivity and transport between the two vegetation types. To begin to calibrate landscape openness in eastern North America, we collected 2 1 samples of surface sediments front small ponds (less than 60 ha) in the Upper Connecticut River Valley of New England, USA.

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Effect of 'brown tide' shading on eelgrass

Dennison WC, Marshall GJ, and Wigand C ·
1989

For the past 4 summers (1985–1988), the microalga Aureococcus anophagefferens bloomed in Long Island embayments, causing large scale perturbations in water column dynamics. The “brown tide” algal blooms brought about significant changes in the benthic community as well. The high cell densities (>109 l-1) of A. anophagefferens significantly increased light absorption in the water column (Cosper et al., 1987), and reduced the light available to plants living on the bottom of the embayments.

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An examination of the environmental factors important to initiating and sustaining 'brown tide' blooms

Cosper EM, Dennison WC, Milligan A, Carpenter EJ, Lee C, Holzapfel J, and Milanese L ·
1988

The first appearance of the “brown tide” in the early summer of 1985 was over a wide geographic range along the northeast coast of the United States in non-contiguous bodies of water: Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island, and Long Island embayments in New York as well as Barnegat Bay in New Jersey (Fig.1) (Nuzzi and Waters, 1989; Olsen, 1989; Sieburth et al., 1988; Sieburth and Johnson, 1989; Smayda and Villareal, 1989).

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