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Ecosystems and Global Climate Change: A review of potential impacts on U.S. terrestrial ecosystems and biodiversity (Page 1)

Ecosystems and Global Climate Change: A review of potential impacts on U.S. terrestrial ecosystems and biodiversity

Malcolm JR and Pitelka LF ·
1 December 2000

This report was prepared for the Pew Center on Global Climate Change to provide an overview of the potential effects of climate change on natural terrestrial ecosystems and their component species. Published in December 2000, it is the fifth in a series of reports examining the potential impacts of climate change on the U.S. environment. Coordinator:

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Effect of the seagrass Zostera capricorni on sediment microbial processes (Page 1)

Effect of the seagrass Zostera capricorni on sediment microbial processes

Hansen JW, Udy JW, Perry CJ, Dennison WC, and Lomstein BA ·
2000

The effect of the seagrass Zostera capricorni on sediment microbial processes was studied in a tank experiment, where vegetated and unvegetated control sediments were incubated in 10 and 50% of incident light. Leaf and root-rhizome biomass, shoot density, and leaf productivity were significantly higher when plants were incubated in 50 % than in 10 % of incident Light.

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Physiological responses of five seagrass species to trace metals (Page 1)

Physiological responses of five seagrass species to trace metals

Prange JA and Dennison WC ·
2000

Trace metal run-off associated with urban and industrial development poses potential threats to seagrasses in adjacent coastal ecosystems, Seagrass from the largest urban (Moreton Bay) and industrial (Port Curtis) coastal regions in Queensland, Australia were assessed for metal concentrations of iron (Fe), aluminium (Al), zinc (Zn), chromium (Cr) and copper (Cu), Trace metal concentrations in seagrass (Zostera capricorni) leaf and root-rhizome tissue had the following overall trend:

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Sediment-based reconstruction of submersed aquatic vegetation distribution in the Severn River, a sub-estuary of Chesapeake Bay (Page 1)

Sediment-based reconstruction of submersed aquatic vegetation distribution in the Severn River, a sub-estuary of Chesapeake Bay

Arnold RR, Cornwell JC, Dennison WC, and Stevenson JC ·
2000

A paleo-ecological reconstruction of long-term changes in the distribution of submersed aquatic Vegetation (SAV) in a Chesapeake sub-estuary was made using dated sediment cores on transects going from shallow (< 0.5 m) to deep (> 2 m) waters. Maynedier and Saltworks Creeks, branches of the Severn River, have had substantial losses of SAV, similar to many parts of the upper Chesapeake Bay.

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The impact of the herbicide diuron on photosynthesis in three species of tropical seagrass (Page 1)

The impact of the herbicide diuron on photosynthesis in three species of tropical seagrass

Haynes D, Ralph P, Prange J, and Dennison WC ·
2000

The impact and recovery from exposure to the herbicide diuron [DCMU; 3-(3′,4′-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea] was assessed for three tropical seagrasses, maintained in outdoor aquaria over a 10-day period. Photosynthetic stress was detected using chlorophyll a fluorescence, measured with a Diving-PAM (pulse amplitude modulated fluorometer).

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Utilization of nitrogen and carbon by phytoplankton in Moreton Bay, Australia (Page 1)

Utilization of nitrogen and carbon by phytoplankton in Moreton Bay, Australia

O'Donohue MJ, Glibert PM, and Dennison WC ·
2000

Water samples were collected within river mouths, at river plume sites and at well flushed ocean-influenced sites within Moreton Bay, a shallow subtropical embayment in south-eastern Queensland. Rates of inorganic nitrogen (NH4+ and NO3-) and carbon uptake were determined across temporal and spatial scales by use of N-15 and C-14 incorporation. Phytoplankton productivity, measured as CO2 uptake, was highest at the river mouths.

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Science and Site 104: Long-term Options for Dredged Sediment Placement (Page 1)

Science and Site 104: Long-term Options for Dredged Sediment Placement

Baker JE, Boesch DF, Boicourt WC, Boynton WR, Chao SY, Cornwell JC, Fisher TR, Houde ED, Kennedy VS, Mason RP, Mihursky JA, Miller TJ, Sanford LP, Secor DH, Stevenson JC and Wright DA ·
15 September 1999

Scientists from the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science have evaluated the scientific understanding and uncertainty related to five issues regarding the environmental effects of placement of dredged sediments at Site 104, at the head of the deep, natural channel of the Chesapeake Bay. This assessment was based on reviews of relevant studies and impact statements as well as on the scientists’ extensive knowledge and experience concerning the Chesapeake Bay ecosystem.

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Blooms of the cyanobacterium Lyngbya majuscula in coastal waters of Queensland, Australia (Page 1)

Blooms of the cyanobacterium Lyngbya majuscula in coastal waters of Queensland, Australia

Dennison WC, O'Neil JM, Duffy EJ, Oliver PE, and Shaw GR ·
1999

Several coastal areas in southeast Queensland, Australia have been affected by blooms of the cyanobacterium Lyngbya majuscula Gomont ("Mermaid hair"). Lyngbya majuscula blooms have caused respiratory irritation, eye inflammation and severe contact dermatitis in fisherman and swimmers as well as causing reduced fish catch, seagrass loss and localized inputs of nitrogen through nitrogen fixation.

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