IAN is committed to producing practical, user-centered communications that foster a better understanding of science and enable readers to pursue new opportunities in research, education, and environmental problem-solving. Our publications synthesize scientific findings using effective science communication techniques.

Effect of Hydric Soil Disturbance on Ecological Health of Coastal Waters (Page 1)

Effect of Hydric Soil Disturbance on Ecological Health of Coastal Waters

Dennison WC, O' Neil JM, Jones AB, Costanzo SD, Hewson I, and Prange JA ·
1999

Soil disturbance in coastal regions could be linked to a variety of deleterious environmental impacts. The existing data are preliminary, but there is sufficient evidence to raise the issue to a higher priority for both research and management.

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Effects of light deprivation on the survival and recovery of the seagrass Halophila ovalis (RBr) Hook (Page 1)

Effects of light deprivation on the survival and recovery of the seagrass Halophila ovalis (RBr) Hook

Longstaff BJ, Loneragan NR, O'Donohue MJ, and Dennison WC ·
1999

Survival and recovery of the seagrass Halophiln ovalis (R.Br.) Hook during and after light deprivation was investigated to assist in the interpretation of recent losses of Halophiln spp. in Queensland, Australia. Light deprivation experiments were conducted in outdoor aquaria and in situ at two water depths. Halophiln ovalis plants were deprived of light for a maximum of 30 days, and recovery processes were investigated for up to 18 days following 15 days of light deprivation.

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Environmental Management of Aquaculture Effluent: Development of Biological Indicators and Biological Filters (Page 1)

Environmental Management of Aquaculture Effluent: Development of Biological Indicators and Biological Filters

Jones AB ·
1999

Rapid global expansion of the aquaculture industry has prompted the need for development of techniques for effective environmental management. In intensively farmed regions, aquaculture effluent has resulted in environmental degradation of receiving waters. The issues to be addressed include analysis of effluent water quality, determination of the ecological impact of effluent on the ecosystem, and development of remediation strategies to reduce these impacts.

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Moreton Bay and Catchment (Page 1)

Moreton Bay and Catchment

Tibbetts IR, Narelle JH and Dennison WC (Editors) ·
1 January 1999

This book is the proceedings of the Moreton Bay and Catchment conference. It is divided into nine major sections covering the environmental history of the region, geology and geomorphology, catchment rivers and lakes, water quality, marine plants, marine animals, corals, flood effects and management options. The conference was preceded by a relatively small flood, which served as an opportunity to study the impact of flood events on Moreton Bay.

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Moreton Bay Study (Page 1)

Moreton Bay Study

Dennison WC and Abal EG ·
1 January 1999

This book was the second in a series of publications in support of the Healthy Waterways Campaign in Southeast Queensland, Australia. It synthesizes the scientific investigations of Moreton Bay from 17 different studies of the physics, chemistry, geology biology and ecology in the region. It also provided management, research and monitoring recommendations based on the scientific conclusions.

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Responses of seagrass to nutrients in the Great Barrier Reef, Australia (Page 1)

Responses of seagrass to nutrients in the Great Barrier Reef, Australia

Udy JW, Dennison WC, Long WJL, and McKenzie LJ ·
1999

Declines in seagrass biomass and growth have been widely reported in response to anthropogenic impacts. In contrast, the distribution and biomass of seagrass in the carbonate sediment around Green Island reef, part of Australia's Great Barrier Reef (GBR), has measurably increased during the past 50 yr, possibly due to increases in the availability of nutrients from local and regional anthropogenic sources.

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Seagrass and sediment nutrients: Species comparison and fertilisation responses of P. australis at Rottnest Island, Western Australia (Page 1)

Seagrass and sediment nutrients: Species comparison and fertilisation responses of P. australis at Rottnest Island, Western Australia

Udy JW and Dennison WC ·
1999

Seagrasses, marine angiospenns with high rates of primacy productivity, are often hmned by the supply of nutrients or light. We investigated the ambient sedirncnt nutrient availability, biornass, growth and physiological characteristics of five seagrass species common around Rottnest lsland (P. australis, P. sinuosa, A. antarctica, A. griffithii and H. ovalis).

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Seagrass survival during pulsed turbidity events: the effects of light deprivation on the seagrasses Halodule pinifolia and Halophila ovalis (Page 1)

Seagrass survival during pulsed turbidity events: the effects of light deprivation on the seagrasses Halodule pinifolia and Halophila ovalis

Longstaff BJ and Dennison WC ·
1999

Pulsed turbidity events caused by factors such as flooding rivers have the potential to seriously impact seagrass communities by depriving the plants of all available light. The effects of light deprivation was investigated on the survival, morphology and physiology of the tropical seagrasses Halodule pinifolia and Halophila ovalis growing in the South-East Gulf of Carpentaria, Australia, a region where pulsed flood events are common.

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