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Spatial distribution of benthic microalgae on coral reefs determined by remote sensing (Page 1)

Spatial distribution of benthic microalgae on coral reefs determined by remote sensing

Roelfsema CM, Phinn SR, and Dennison WC ·
2002

Understanding the ecological role of benthic microalgae, a highly productive component of coral reef ecosystems, requires information on their spatial distribution. The spatial extent of benthic microalgae on Heron Reef (southern Great Barrier Reef, Australia) was mapped using data from the Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper sensor. integrated with field measurements of sediment chlorophyll concentration and reflectance. Field-measured sediment chlorophyll concentrations.

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Testing the sediment-trapping paradigm of seagrass: do seagrasses influence nutrient status and sediment structure in tropical intertidal environments? (Page 1)

Testing the sediment-trapping paradigm of seagrass: do seagrasses influence nutrient status and sediment structure in tropical intertidal environments?

Mellors J, Marsh H, Carruthers TJB, and Waycott M ·
2002

Seagrass meadows are considered important for sediment trapping and sediment stabilisation. Deposition of fine sediments and associated adsorbed nutrients is considered an important part of the chemical and biological processes attributed to seagrass communities. This paradigm was based on work in temperate regions on Zostera marina and in tropical regions on Thalassia testudinum, two species that maintain relatively high biomass, stable meadows.

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The efficiency and condition of oysters and macroalgae used as biological filters of shrimp pond effluent (Page 1)

The efficiency and condition of oysters and macroalgae used as biological filters of shrimp pond effluent

Jones AB, Preston NP, and Dennison WC ·
2002

Current shrimp pond management practices generally result in elevated concentrations of nutrients, suspended solids, bacteria and phytoplankton compared with the influent water. Concerns about adverse environmental impacts caused by discharging pond effluent directly into adjacent waterways have prompted the search for cost-effective methods of effluent treatment.

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Assessing ecological impacts of shrimp and sewage effluent: Biological indicators with standard water quality analyses (Page 1)

Assessing ecological impacts of shrimp and sewage effluent: Biological indicators with standard water quality analyses

Jones AB, O'Donohue MJ, Udy J, and Dennison WC ·
2001

Despite evidence linking shrimp farming to several cases of environmental degradation, there remains a lack of ecologically meaningful information about the impacts of effluent on receiving waters. The aim of this study was to determine the biological impact of shrimp farm effluent, and to compare and distinguish its impacts from treated sewage effluent.

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Effects of concentrated viral communities on photosynthesis and community composition of co-occurring benthic microalgae and phytoplankton (Page 1)

Effects of concentrated viral communities on photosynthesis and community composition of co-occurring benthic microalgae and phytoplankton

Hewson I, O'Neil JM, Heil CA, Bratbak G, and Dennison WC ·
2001

Marine viruses have been shown to affect phytoplankton productivity; however, there are no reports on the effect of viruses on benthic microalgae (microphytobenthos). Hence, this study investigated the effects of elevated concentrations of virus-like particles on the photosynthetic physiology and community composition of benthic microalgae and phytoplankton.

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ENCORE: The effect of nutrient enrichment on coral reefs. Synthesis of results and conclusions (Page 1)

ENCORE: The effect of nutrient enrichment on coral reefs. Synthesis of results and conclusions

Koop K, Booth D, Broadbent A, Brodie J, Bucher D, Capone D, Coll J, Dennison WC, Erdmann M, Harrison P, Hoegh-Guldberg O, Hutchings P, Jones GB, Larkum AWD, O'Neil JM, Steven A, Tentori E, Ward S, Williamson J, and Yellowlees D ·
2001

Coral reef degradation resulting from nutrient enrichment of coastal waters is of increasing global concern. Although effects of nutrients on coral reef organisms have been demonstrated in the laboratory, there is little direct evidence of nutrient effects on coral reef biota in situ.

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Integrated treatment of shrimp effluent by sedimentation, oyster filtration and macroalgal absorption: a laboratory scale study (Page 1)

Integrated treatment of shrimp effluent by sedimentation, oyster filtration and macroalgal absorption: a laboratory scale study

Jones AB, Dennison WC, and Preston NP ·
2001

Effluent water from shrimp ponds typically contains elevated concentrations of dissolved nutrients and suspended particulates compared to influent water. Attempts to improve effluent water quality using filter feeding bivalves and macroalgae to reduce nutrients have previously been hampered by the high concentration of clay particles typically found in untreated pond effluent. These particles inhibit feeding in bivalves and reduce photosynthesis in macroalgae by increasing effluent turbidity.

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Virus-like particles associated with Lyngbya majuscula (Cyanophyta; Oscillatoriacea) bloom decline in Moreton Bay, Australia (Page 1)

Virus-like particles associated with Lyngbya majuscula (Cyanophyta; Oscillatoriacea) bloom decline in Moreton Bay, Australia

Hewson I, O'Neil JM, and Dennison WC ·
2001

Expansive blooms of the toxic cyanobacterium Lyngbya majuscula were observed in 2 shallow water regions of Moreton Bay, Australia. The rapid bloom decline (8 to <1 km(2) in <7 d) prompted an investigation of the role of cyanophage viruses in the ecophysiology of L. majuscula. Virus-like particles produced by decaying L. majuscula were observed using electron microscopy. The virus-like particles were similar in morphology to viruses in the genus Cyanostyloviridae.

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