An integrated modelling system for management of the Patuxent River estuary and basin, Maryland, USA

Williams MR, Fisher TR, Boynton WR, Cerco CF, Kemp MW, Eshleman KN, Kim SC, Hood RR, Fiscus DA, and Radcliffe GR ·
2006

The Patuxent River watershed is a heavily impacted basin (2290 km(2)) and estuarine tributary (120 km(2)) of the Chesapeake Bay, USA. To assist management of the basin, we are testing a coupled modelling system composed of a watershed model (HSPF), an estuarine circulation model (CH3D), and an estuarine water-quality model (CE-QUAL-ICM).


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Predator identity and additive effects in a treehole community (Page 1)

Predator identity and additive effects in a treehole community

Griswold MW and Lounibos LP ·
2006

Multiple predator species can interact as well as strongly affect lower trophic levels, resulting in complex, nonadditive effects on prey populations and community structure. Studies of aquatic systems have shown that interactive effects of predators on prey are not necessarily predictable from the direct effects of each species alone.


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A Global Crisis for Seagrass Ecosystems (Page 1)

A Global Crisis for Seagrass Ecosystems

Orth RJ, Carruthers TJB, Dennison WC, Duarte CM, Fourqurean JW, Heck KL Jr, Hughes AR, Kendrick GA, Kenworthy WJ, Olyarnik S, Short FT, Waycott M, and Williams SL ·
2006

Seagrasses, marine flowering plants, have a long evolutionary history but are now challenged with rapid environmental changes as a result of coastal human population pressures. Seagrasses provide key ecological services, including organic carbon production and export, nutrient cycling, sediment stabilization, enhanced biodiversity, and trophic transfers to adjacent habitats in tropical and temperate regions.


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Ecosystem response to antibiotics entering the aquatic environment

Costanzo SD, Murby J, and Bates J ·
2005

Awareness of antibiotics in wastewaters and aquatic ecosystems is growing as investigations into alternate pollutants increase and analytical techniques for detecting these chemicals improve. The presence of three antibiotics (ciproffoxacin, norfloxacin and cephalexin) was evaluated in both sewage effluent and environmental waters downstream from a sewage discharge.


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Seasonal and annual variability in the spatial patterns of plankton biomass in Chesapeake Bay

Roman M, Zhang X, McGilliard C, and Boicourt W ·
2005

We conducted high-resolution, underway sampling in April, July, and October for 6 yr (1995-2000) in the large estuary, Chesapeake Bay. This period included climatological extremes in freshwater inputs that strongly influenced both the overall stocks and spatial distribution of phytoplankton and zooplankton. Higher biomass of both phytoplankton and zooplankton occurred in springs, when freshwater input into Chesapeake Bay was above the average discharge.


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Ecophysiology of the marine cyanobacterium, Lyngbya majuscula (Oscillatoriaceae) in Moreton Bay, Australia (Page 1)

Ecophysiology of the marine cyanobacterium, Lyngbya majuscula (Oscillatoriaceae) in Moreton Bay, Australia

Watkinson AJ, O'Neil JM, and Dennison WC ·
2005

Large blooms of the marine cyanobacterium Lyngbya majuscula in Moreton Bay, Australia (27 degrees 05\\\'S, 153 degrees 08\\\'E) have been re-occurring for several years. A bloom was studied in Deception Bay (Northern Moreton Bay) in detail over the period January-March 2000. In situ data loggers and field sampling characterised various environmental parameters before and during the L. majuscula bloom.


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Modelling phytoplankton deposition to Chesapeake Bay sediments during winter-spring: interannual variability in relation to river flow

Hagy JD, Boynton WR, and Jasinski DA ·
2005

The often-rapid deposition of phytoplankton to sediments at the end of the spring phytoplankton bloom is an important component of benthic-pelagic coupling in temperate and high latitude estuaries and other aquatic systems. However, quantifying the flux is difficult, particularly in spatially heterogeneous environments.


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Habitat complexity and sex-dependent predation of mosquito larvae in containers

Alto BW, Griswold MW, and Lounibos LP ·
2005

Studies in aquatic systems have shown that habitat complexity may provide refuge or reduce the number of encounters prey have with actively searching predators. For ambush predators, habitat complexity may enhance or have no effect on predation rates because it conceals predators, reduces prey detection by predators, or visually impairs both predators and prey.


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