Know the connection, know your coast: Coastal Georgia's first ecosystem report card

Alexandra Fries ·
8 December 2015
Environmental Report Cards | Science Communication |     1 comments

The Coastal Georgia Ecosystem Report Card was released November 13th, in Brunswick, Georgia. Heath Kelsey and I traveled to Georgia for the release event, which included both a media talk and a more detailed technical talk on the report card results.

Coastal Georgia has a huge tidal range, as seen in this photo from St. Simon’s Island. This was one of the many things discussed in production of the report card.
Coastal Georgia has a huge tidal range, as seen in this photo from St. Simon’s Island. This was one of the many things discussed in production of the report card.

The director of Georgia DNR’s Coastal Resources Division, Spud Woodward, gave an overview talk about the project and it’s importance in Georgia. He plans to use the report card to speak to legislators at an upcoming meeting.

Spud Woodward giving an introduction to the project.
Spud Woodward giving an introduction to the project.

Jill Andrews, the project lead at the Coastal Resources Division also spoke about the report card process, acknowledging key people who participated and mentioning next steps for the report card in the future.

Jill Andrews speaking about the report card process.
Jill Andrews speaking about the report card process.

Heath Kelsey gave the main report card presentations and revealed the results. After the results were revealed, Heath and I responded to questions on the details of the report card.

Heath Kelsey presenting the report card results.
Heath Kelsey presenting the report card results.

Overall Coastal Georgia scored a B+, a moderately good score. This means that most human health, fisheries, and wildlife indicators meet desired levels. Indicators in these locations tend to be good, often leading to acceptable habitat conditions. While there is always more work to be done, Coastal Georgia has very high scores. This is mainly due to the relatively undeveloped coastal landscape in Georgia and good stewardship by Georgia’s citizens.

report card-01
The results of the Coastal Georgia Ecosystem Report Card.

Georgia DNR is planning to complete a report card every year. Further information on the report card can be found both on the IAN Website and the Georgia DNR website.

About the author

Alexandra Fries

Alexandra is a Program Manager at the Integration and Application Network (IAN) based at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science in Annapolis MD. Alexandra’s work in environmental management has been focused on assessment, monitoring, and management of aquatic, marine, and terrestrial ecosystems. Alexandra has extensive experience in data analysis, synthesis, mapping, interpretation, and communication. Alexandra has experience working with a diverse group of partners including those in local, state, and federal government, non-governmental organizations, non-profit organizations, private industry, and academia. Within IAN, Alexandra conducts data analysis, synthesis, and communication by completing environmental report cards, updating the IAN website, and conducting science communication courses. Alexandra also creates science communication materials such as diagrams, posters, presentations, newsletters, and reports using Adobe Creative Suite, Microsoft Office Suite, and ArcGIS. Alexandra has experience managing projects and staff on local and international projects, liaising directly with partners and colleagues, and providing insights on project direction and goals.



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Comments

  • Carla 6 years ago

    You could certainly see your expertise within the
    article you write. The world hopes for even more passionate writers like you who aren't afraid to say how they believe.

    Always follow your heart.

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