IAN is committed to producing practical, user-centered communications that foster a better understanding of science and enable readers to pursue new opportunities in research, education, and environmental problem-solving. Our publications synthesize scientific findings using effective science communication techniques.

Eutrophication and harmful algal blooms: A scientific consensus (Page 1)

Eutrophication and harmful algal blooms: A scientific consensus

Heisler J, Glibert PM, Burkholder JM, Anderson DM, Cochlan W, Dennison WC, Dortch Q, Gobler CJ, Heil CA, Humphries E, Lewitus A, Magnien R, Marshall HG, Sellner K, Stockwell DA, Stoecker DK, and Suddleson M ·
2008

In January 2003, the US Environmental Protection Agency sponsored a "roundtable discussion" to develop a consensus on the relationship between eutrophication and harmful algal blooms (HABs), specifically targeting those relationships for which management actions may be appropriate. Academic, federal, and state agency representatives were in attendance. The following seven statements were unanimously adopted by attendees based on review and analysis of current as well as pertinent previous data:

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Groundwater influences on atmospheric dust generation in deserts

Elmore AJ, Kaste JM, Okin GS, and Fantle MS ·
2008

Groundwater resources are being overexploited in arid and semi-arid environments globally, which necessitates a deeper understanding of the roles that groundwater plays in earth system processes. Of particular importance is the elucidation of groundwater's effect on the generation of atmospheric dust.

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Local and large-scale climate forcing of Puget Sound oceanographic properties on seasonal to interdecadal timescales

Moore SK, Mantua NJ, Kellogg JP, and Newton JA ·
2008

The influence of climate on Puget Sound oceanographic properties is investigated on seasonal to interannual timescales using continuous profile data at 16 stations from 1993 to 2002 and records of sea surface temperature (SST) and sea surface salinity (SSS) from 1951 to 2002. Principal components analyses of profile data identify indices representing 42%, 58%, and 56% of the total variability at depth-station combinations for temperature, salinity, and density, respectively…

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Spatial and temporal variability of ribotyping results at a small watershed in South Carolina (Page 1)

Spatial and temporal variability of ribotyping results at a small watershed in South Carolina

Kelsey RH, Webster LF, Kenny DJ, Stewart JR, and Scott GI ·
2008

The utility of library-based ribotyping methods for a very small study area was evaluated through comparison of local results to libraries with differing spatial and temporal scales. Ribotyping of Escherichia coli isolates was used to evaluate sources of fecal pollution at a coastal golf course in Beaufort County, South Carolina.

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Spatial distribution of agricultural residue from rice for potential biofuel production in China

Elmore AJ, Shi X, Gorence NJ, Li X, Jin H, Wang F, and Zhang X ·
2008

In China, agricultural residues (particularly from rice) are widely used for energy and other applications, albeit on a localized scale and often at poor rates of efficiency. if some portion of this biomass were to be reallocated and transported to central biomass energy facilities, an initial component of the design process would be to gain an understanding of the spatial distribution of biomass production.

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The charisma of coastal ecosystems: addressing the imbalance (Page 1)

The charisma of coastal ecosystems: addressing the imbalance

Duarte CM, Dennison WC, Orth RJ, and Carruthers TJB ·
2008

Coastal ecosystems including coral reefs, mangrove forests, seagrass meadows, and salt marshes are being lost at alarming rates, and increased scientific understanding of causes has failed to stem these losses. Coastal habitats receive contrasting research effort, with 60% of all of the published research carried out on coral reefs, compared to 11–14% of the records for each of salt marshes, mangrove forests, and seagrass meadows.

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Trophic Transfers from Seagrass Meadows Subsidize Diverse Marine and Terrestrial Consumers (Page 1)

Trophic Transfers from Seagrass Meadows Subsidize Diverse Marine and Terrestrial Consumers

Heck KL, Carruthers TJB, Duarte CM, Hughes AR, Kendrick G, Orth RJ, and Williams SW ·
2008

In many coastal locations, seagrass meadows are part of a greater seascape that includes both marine and terrestrial elements, each linked to the other via the foraging patterns of consumers (both predators and herbivores), and the passive drift of seagrass propagules, leaves, roots and rhizomes, and seagrass-associated macroalgal detritus. With seagrasses declining in many regions, the linkages between seagrass meadows and other habitats are being altered and diminished.

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Using the aquatic macrophyte Vallisneria americana (wild celery) as a nutrient bioindicator (Page 1)

Using the aquatic macrophyte Vallisneria americana (wild celery) as a nutrient bioindicator

Benson ER, O'Neil JM, and Dennison WC ·
2008

Human sewage and septic waste are significant sources of nutrient loading to many aquatic ecosystems. Ecologically relevant nitrogen sources can be traced by analyzing nitrogen stable isotope ratios (δ15N signatures) in aquatic plants. Elevated δ15N signatures can suggest increased uptake of nitrogen derived from human and/or animal waste. In the current study, Vallisneria americana, a freshwater angiosperm, was collected from several locations in Upper Saranac Lake, NY, USA.

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Accurately measuring the abundance of benthic microalgae in spatially variable habitats (Page 1)

Accurately measuring the abundance of benthic microalgae in spatially variable habitats

Grinham AR, Carruthers TJB, Fisher PL, Udy JW, and Dennison WC ·
2007

Although many studies measure the abundance of benthic microalgae (BMA), at the meters squared scale, comparing these studies is difficult due to the variety of sampling, extraction, and analysis techniques. This difficulty is exacerbated by the fact that BMA abundance has high spatial and temporal variability, at all spatial scales.

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