IAN is committed to producing practical, user-centered communications that foster a better understanding of science and enable readers to pursue new opportunities in research, education, and environmental problem-solving. Our publications synthesize scientific findings using effective science communication techniques.

Chapter 1: Environmental campaigns: achieving a shared vision using research, monitoring, and management

Dennison WC and Wicks EC ·
2010

A coastal assessment program cannot simply draw from a few individuals; it takes contributions from an entire community and the creation of a shared vision. Keeping a balance among research, monitoring, and management is especially important and includes the dynamics of human interactions and strong communication between stakeholders and the broader community.

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Chapter 2: Environmental leadership: achieving a sustainable future by fostering environmental champions

Dennison WC and Thomas JE ·
2010

For every environmental campaign, a strong leader is needed for guidance and motivation. There have been a series of leaders or "champions" in the history of the world who have changed life on this planet. All of these leaders, no matter what area their specialty, have contained the following traits: knowledge of their field; passion for what they do; and an ability to successfully communicate their messages not only to their colleagues, but also to the broader community.

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Chapter 3: Communication products: creating a process for generating science communication products

Thomas JE, Hawkey JM, Jones AB, Wicks EC, and Woerner JL ·
2010

This chapter discusses how to create the physical communication products needed to broadcast the messages within a communication strategy (see Chapter 4). To determine the kind of product needed, several different elements should be considered, including the background of the audience, the size of the audience, and the amount of time available to produce the product. The products discussed are conceptual diagrams, newsletters, presentations, websites, posters, and books.

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Chapter 4: Communication strategy: packaging and delivering the message for maximum impact

Conner CS, Dennison WC, and Thomas JE ·
2010

Drawing from the last chapter and its emphasis on the importance of communication, this chapter discusses ways to broadcast a message internally within a coastal assessment program and externally to the general public. Throughout the chapter, the steps involved in broadcasting the message (such as determining target audience, ways in which to relay the message, and how to create an appropriate timeline) will be explained in detail.

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Chapter 5: Ecological indicators: assessing ecosystem health using metrics

Wicks EC, Longstaff BJ, Fertig BM, and Dennison WC ·
2010

Chapter 4 discussed how selecting an appropriate communication product can affect an audience and persuade opinions. This chapter discusses how using another tool, an indicator (Figure 5.1), not only can persuade opinions, but also can be used to evaluate the health of an ecosystem.

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Chapter 6: Ecological report cards: integrating indicators into report cards

Williams MR, Longstaff BJ, Wicks EC, Carruthers TJB, and Florkowski LN ·
2010

This chapter continues the discussion of ecological indicators but with the specific application of producing ecological report cards. It explains the reasons for producing report cards, the steps to produce indicators based on ecological thresholds, and the process of combining indicators into overarching indices. Ecological report cards, like the indicators that they are based on, are one of the most important products for directing data collection and analysis.

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Chapter 7: Ecological forecasts: building a predictive capacity to guide management

Jasinski DA, Longstaff BJ, and Wicks EC ·
2010

This chapter provides an overview of the process of developing, producing, and releasing an ecological forecast, which is supported by statistical analysis and models that underpin forecasts (see Chapters 8 and 9). Areas discussed in this chapter include why you may consider conducting ecological forecasting, some of the essential elements of a forecasting program, and some of the challenges you may face.

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Chapter 8: Environmental statistics: balancing simplicity and explanatory power

Kimmel DG, Townsend H, Carruthers TJB, and Fertig BM ·
2010

One of the most important goals of a coastal assessment program is to increase the knowledge of individuals and agencies who make management decisions. Information must be presented in an easy-to-understand format and supported by quantitative analyses. Quantitative analyses often involve applying statistical techniques that are used to visualize, describe, and model data.

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Chapter 9: Environmental models: providing synthesis, analysis, simulation, and prediction

Lookingbill T, Carruthers TJB, Testa JM, Nuttle WK, and Shenk G ·
2010

Models can act as an interface among scientists, managers, and the public to build a shared understanding of the status and trends of coastal resources (Figure 9.1). Environmental models can be an effective way of synthesizing large quantities of environmental data. These models can assume a variety of forms and be used to address many different types of research questions.

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Climate change and cattle nutritional stress

Craine JM, Elmore AJ, Olson KC, and Tolleson D ·
2010

Owing to the complex interactions among climate, plants, cattle grazing, and land management practices, the impacts of climate change on cattle have been hard to predict. Predicting future grassland ecosystem functioning relies on understanding how changes in climate alter the quantity of forage produced, but also forage quality.

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