Seagrasses of south-west Australia: A conceptual synthesis of the world's most diverse and extensive seagrass meadows

Carruthers TJB, Dennison WC, Kendrick GA, Waycott M, Walker DI, and Cambridge ML ·
2007

South-west Australia contains extensive seagrass meadows along 2,500 km of coastline from the shallow subtidal to 50+ m water depths, and in many of the 51 bar-built estuaries along the coast. There are geomorphological differences between the south and west coasts that result in different patterns of swell exposure influencing the processes that structure seagrass habitats.


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Is there a risk associated with the insect repellent DEET (N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide) commonly found in aquatic environments?

Costanzo SD, Watkinson AJ, Murby EJ, Kolpin DW, and Sandstrom MW ·
2007

DEET (N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide) is the active ingredient of most commercial insect repellents. This compound has commonly been detected in aquatic water samples from around the world indicating that DEET is both mobile and persistent, despite earlier assumptions that DEET was unlikely to enter aquatic ecosystems. DEET's registration category does not require an ecological risk assessment, thus information on the ecological toxicity of DEET is sparse.


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Building EDENs: The rise of environmentally distributed ecological networks (Page 1)

Building EDENs: The rise of environmentally distributed ecological networks

Craine JM, Battersby J, Elmore AJ, and Jones AW ·
2007

Environmentally distributed ecological networks (EDENs) are growing increasingly important in ecology, coordinating research in more disciplines and over larger areas than ever before, while supplanting post hoc syntheses of uncoordinated research. With the rise of multiple broadly focused, continental-scale EDENs, these networks will be directing an increasingly large proportion of resources in ecology, which warrants a review of their use.


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The challenge of communicating monitoring results to effect change (Page 1)

The challenge of communicating monitoring results to effect change

Carter SL, Mora-Bourgeois G, Lookingbill TR, Carruthers TJB, and Dennison WC ·
2007

SINCE ITS INCEPTION, the National Park Service (NPS) has been charged with preserving the natural and cultural heritage of the United States for future generations. It is only recently, however, that the NPS has fully embraced the need to understand and describe the ecology of parks. The infusion of an ecological perspective into the natural resource management of the national parks is what separates today's park management from much of that which preceded it (Sellars 1997).


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Novel method for rapid assessment of antibiotic resistance in Escherichia coli isolates from environmental waters by use of a modified chromogenic agar

Watkinson AJ, Micalizzi GR, Bates JR, and Costanzo SD ·
2007

We validated a novel method for screening Escherichia coli resistance to antibiotics in environmental samples using modified Difco MI agar (Becton Dickinson) impregnated with selected antibiotics (tetracycline, ampicillin, cephalexin, and sulfamethoxazole), termed MI-R. This method combines an existing rapid assessment technique for E.


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An eye-opening approach to developing and communicating integrated environmental assessments (Page 1)

An eye-opening approach to developing and communicating integrated environmental assessments

Dennison WC, Lookingbill TR, Carruthers TJB, Hawkey JM, and Carter SM ·
2007

Communication among managers, the public, and scientists is the key to successful ecosystem management; however, the varied perspectives and interests of these groups can make such communication difficult. One way to achieve effective communication is to develop a common knowledge base by combining syntheses of key scientific results with information-rich visual elements.


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Occurrence and seasonal variations of algal toxins in water, phytoplankton and shellfish from North Stradbroke Island, Queensland, Australia

Takahashi E, Yu Q, Eaglesham G, Connell DW, McBroom J, Costanzo SD, and Shaw GR ·
2007

A number of marine microalgae are known to produce toxins that can accumulate in shellfish and when eaten, lead to toxic and potentially fatal reactions in humans. This paper reports on the occurrence and seasonal variations of algal toxins in the waters, phytoplankton and shellfish of Southeast Queensland, Australia.


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Accurately measuring the abundance of benthic microalgae in spatially variable habitats (Page 1)

Accurately measuring the abundance of benthic microalgae in spatially variable habitats

Grinham AR, Carruthers TJB, Fisher PL, Udy JW, and Dennison WC ·
2007

Although many studies measure the abundance of benthic microalgae (BMA), at the meters squared scale, comparing these studies is difficult due to the variety of sampling, extraction, and analysis techniques. This difficulty is exacerbated by the fact that BMA abundance has high spatial and temporal variability, at all spatial scales.


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Removal of antibiotics in conventional and advanced wastewater treatment: Implications for environmental discharge and wastewater recycling

Watkinson AJ, Murby EJ, and Costanzo SD ·
2007

Removal of 28 human and veterinary antibiotics was assessed in a conventional (activated sludge) and advanced (microfiltration/reverse osmosis) wastewater treatment plant (VJVvrTP) in Brisbane, Australia. The dominant antibiotics detected in wastewater influents were cephalexin (med. 4.6 gL(,)(-1) freq. 100%), ciprofloxacin (med. 3.8 [mu]gL(-1) freq. 100%), cefaclor (med. 0.5 [mu]gL(-1), freq. 100%), sulphamethoxazole (med. 0.36 [mu]gL(-1), freq. 100%) and trimethoprim (med.


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Barnegat Bay-Little Egg Harbor Estuary: Case study of a highly eutrophic coastal bay system (Page 1)

Barnegat Bay-Little Egg Harbor Estuary: Case study of a highly eutrophic coastal bay system

Kennish MJ, Bricker SB, Dennison WC, Glibert PM, Livingston RJ, Moore KA, Noble RT, Paerl HW, Ramstack JM, Seitzinger S, Tomasko DA, and Valiela I ·
2007

The Barnegat Bay–Little Egg Harbor Estuary is classified here as a highly eutrophic estuary based on application of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s National Estuarine Eutrophication Assessment model. Because it is shallow, poorly flushed, and bordered by highly developed watershed areas, the estuary is particularly susceptible to the effects of nutrient loading.


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