A hydrographic transient above the Salty Dawg hydrothermal field, Endeavour segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

Kellogg JP and McDuff RE ·
2010

During systematic repeat hydrography cruises to the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge in the summers of 2004, 2005, and 2006, we encountered a transient increase in the water column heat content above the Salty Dawg hydrothermal field. First observed in July 2005 and mapped in greater detail in August 2005, this feature was not a typical event or megaplume since potential temperature anomalies were continuously elevated from the plume top to the seafloor.


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Long-Term Trends in Submersed Aquatic Vegetation (SAV) in Chesapeake Bay, USA, Related to Water Quality (Page 1)

Long-Term Trends in Submersed Aquatic Vegetation (SAV) in Chesapeake Bay, USA, Related to Water Quality

Orth RJ, Williams MR, Marion SR, Wilcox DJ, Carruthers TJB, Moore KA, Kemp WM, Dennison WC, Rybicki N, Bergstrom P, and Batiuk RA ·
2010

Chesapeake Bay supports a diverse assemblage of marine and freshwater species of submersed aquatic vegetation (SAV) whose broad distributions are generally constrained by salinity. An annual aerial SAV monitoring program and a bi-monthly to monthly water quality monitoring program have been conducted throughout Chesapeake Bay since 1984. We performed an analysis of SAV abundance and up to 22 environmental variables potentially influencing SAV growth and abundance (1984-2006).


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Chapter 5: Ecological indicators: assessing ecosystem health using metrics

Wicks EC, Longstaff BJ, Fertig BM, and Dennison WC ·
2010

Chapter 4 discussed how selecting an appropriate communication product can affect an audience and persuade opinions. This chapter discusses how using another tool, an indicator (Figure 5.1), not only can persuade opinions, but also can be used to evaluate the health of an ecosystem.


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Chapter 6: Ecological report cards: integrating indicators into report cards

Williams MR, Longstaff BJ, Wicks EC, Carruthers TJB, and Florkowski LN ·
2010

This chapter continues the discussion of ecological indicators but with the specific application of producing ecological report cards. It explains the reasons for producing report cards, the steps to produce indicators based on ecological thresholds, and the process of combining indicators into overarching indices. Ecological report cards, like the indicators that they are based on, are one of the most important products for directing data collection and analysis.


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Climate change and cattle nutritional stress

Craine JM, Elmore AJ, Olson KC, and Tolleson D ·
2010

Owing to the complex interactions among climate, plants, cattle grazing, and land management practices, the impacts of climate change on cattle have been hard to predict. Predicting future grassland ecosystem functioning relies on understanding how changes in climate alter the quantity of forage produced, but also forage quality.


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Chapter 7: Ecological forecasts: building a predictive capacity to guide management

Jasinski DA, Longstaff BJ, and Wicks EC ·
2010

This chapter provides an overview of the process of developing, producing, and releasing an ecological forecast, which is supported by statistical analysis and models that underpin forecasts (see Chapters 8 and 9). Areas discussed in this chapter include why you may consider conducting ecological forecasting, some of the essential elements of a forecasting program, and some of the challenges you may face.


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Long-Term Trends of Water Quality and Biotic Metrics in Chesapeake Bay: 1986 to 2008 (Page 1)

Long-Term Trends of Water Quality and Biotic Metrics in Chesapeake Bay: 1986 to 2008

Williams MR, Filoso S, Longstaff BJ, and Dennison WC ·
2010

We analyzed trends in a 23-year period of water quality and biotic data for Chesapeake Bay. Indicators were used to detect trends of improving and worsening environmental health in 15 regions and 70 segments of the bay and to assess the estuarine ecosystem's responses to reduced nutrient loading from point (i.e., sewage treatment facilities) and nonpoint (e.g., agricultural and urban land use) sources.


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Improvements to Shellfish Harvest Area Closure Decision Making Using GIS, Remote Sensing, and Predictive Models (Page 1)

Improvements to Shellfish Harvest Area Closure Decision Making Using GIS, Remote Sensing, and Predictive Models

Kelsey RH, Scott GI, Porter DE, Siewicki TC, and Edwards DG ·
2010

Currently, many states use precipitation information to regulate periodic closures of shellfish harvest areas based on a presumptive relationship between rainfall and bacteria concentration. We evaluate this relationship in four South Carolina estuaries and suggest new predictive models that integrate remote sensing precipitation data with additional environmental and climatic data.


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Chapter 8: Environmental statistics: balancing simplicity and explanatory power

Kimmel DG, Townsend H, Carruthers TJB, and Fertig BM ·
2010

One of the most important goals of a coastal assessment program is to increase the knowledge of individuals and agencies who make management decisions. Information must be presented in an easy-to-understand format and supported by quantitative analyses. Quantitative analyses often involve applying statistical techniques that are used to visualize, describe, and model data.


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